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Zovcneri 



HISTORY 



OF 



WESTMORELAND 
COUNTY 



PENNSYLVANIA 



GENEALOGICAL MEMOIRS 

COMPILED UNDER THE EDITORIAL SUPERVISION OF 

JOHN W. JORDAN, LL.D.. 

OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOL. II, 



NEW YORK CHICAGO 

THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 
190(i 



^.' 



[the NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY I 

ASTOR, LENOX MO 
TILDEN FOUNOATIOKa. 
1906 ^ 



PREFACE 



As a proper acconipaiiimciit to jucli a narrative history as is contained 
in the first vohmie of tliis work, is the department of Genealogical and Per- 
sonal History, prepared under the editorial supervision of John W. Jordan, 
LL. D., of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. Its purpose has been to 
present many of the most important family records of Westmoreland county. 
History, proper, of necessity, is a narrative of what has been accomplished 
by people in the mass, and can take little note of individuals. Here begins 
the mission of the genealogist and investigator of the personal lives of those 
who have borne the heat and burden of the day, in tracing whence and from 
whom they came, in portraying their deeds and the spirit with which they were 
actuated, and holding up their effort as an example to those who come after- 
ward. The storv of such achievements is a sacred trust committed to the 
people of the present, upon whom devolves the perpetuation of the record. 
The custodian of records concerning the useful men of preceding generations, 
and of their descendants who have lived lives of honor and usefulness, Vv-ho 
places his knowledge in preservable and accessible form, performs a public 
service in rendering honor to whom honor is due, inculcating the most valua- 
ble lessons of patriotism and good citizenship. This fact finds recognition in 
the warm welcome given in recent years to Genealogical and Family His- 
tories. Such are in constant and general demand, and are sought for m the 
great libraries, by book, magazine and newspaper writers and lecturers, from 
foreign lands, as well as from all portions of our own country. Such a work 
as this now in hand will possess an especial value for those who, out of a 
laudable pride, seek to trace their descent from those who battled for the 
making of the United States, and who may thus establish their eligibility to 
membership in various patriotic orders. 

With reference to the genealogical and biographical matter contained 
in these pages, it is to be said that in its preparation the publishers have 
observed the utmost care. With such a mass of material, as a matter of neces- 
sity, the work must needs be committed to various writers. If, in some cases, 
the sketch should be incomplete or faulty, the shortcoming is ascribable to the 
paucity of data furnished, many families being without exact records in their 
family line. In all cases the sketches have been submitted to the subject or 
to his representative, for correction and revision. 

It is believed that the present work will prove a real addition to the mass 
of literature concerning the people of the historic region under consideration, 
and that, without it, much valuable information therein contnined would be 
irretrievably lost, owing to the passing away of many custodians of faiuily 
records and the disappearance of such matter. 

THE PUBLISHERS. 



INDE> 



PAGE 

Abl)aticchio, Archangelo 272 

AcUerman. Henry S 72 

Adair. William F 503 

Albert. David E 2yy 

Albright. Smith M 150 

Alcorn Family 539 

Alcorn, George A 540 

.Alcorn, George E 540 

Alcorn. Roliert N 54° 

Allwine. Samuel 447 

Alter. Frank R 4S9 

Amann. Peter 254 

Ambrose. Jacob T 469 

Anient. William S .I24 

Anderson. Alonzo L 523 

Anderson, George C 269 

Anderson. John E 494 

Anderson. John R 636 

Andrews. David G 332 

.\rmbrust, John L 420 

Armitage. John L 429 

Armitage, William 564 

Armstrong. Robert A 526 

.\rter. Daniel A .^o 

Aspey. L. S 469 

Atkinson, David S 76 

Bailey. George W •. 619 

Bair. David 5/6 ' 

Bair. Edward H S9 

Bamforth. Henry 613 

Barkell. W. J 201 

Barkley. Emanuel 519 

Barkley, Harvey F t78 

Barkley. John W .307 

Barnes. Edward 256 

Barnhart. Lowry A 616 

Barr, John S 5^7 

Bashiom, Alexander 610 

Baughman, Jeremiah 524 

Baiighman, Wilson 365 

Baxter. Elmer J. . .' 184 

Baxter. Harry H 497 

Beacom. James S 130 

Beale. John C 492 

Beamer Family 402 

Beamer, Henry G 555 

Beamer, Michael 403 

Beamer. William J 403 

Beancr. George W 592 

Bearer. Harry J 242 

Bcatty, Albert M 192 

Beatty, John F 526 

Bcatty. John. Jr • .504 

Becker, John G ; 639 

Behm. Henrv 479 

Bell, Albert H 29 



P.\GE 

Bell, Samuel 535 

Beltz, Joseph |Si 

Bender Fainily 486 

Bender, Joseph 487 

Bender. Samuel 487 

Bemiett. John W 644 

Best. Robert C 589 

Birchfield, Samuel E 287 

Black, F. A 585 

Black, John R 149 

Blair, Charles L 596 

Blair. William B 586 

Blank, John A 645 

Blank, John J 496 

Blower. Daniel R 499 

Boale. John .A 430 

Bolton, Charles H 273 

Boltz. Jacob A 338 

Borland. . Harry C 550 

Borlin, James 394 

Borlin. James B 394 

Boucher, Charles W 178 

Boucher Family 7 

Boucher, John N 10 

Bovard, John R 324 

Bovard. Robert 595 

Bowman. Adam K 89 

Bowman. William C 528 

Boyd, James K 236 

Bradley. John 622 

Brant, Cyrus C 31S 

Brant. John A 4.^6 

Breniser Family j'i 

Breniser. Harry R 79 

Brinker, Frank D 579 

Brinton. George M 531 

Brown, W. H I97 

Bruner. R. Dennis W 427 

Brunot Family I35 

Brunot, John B 136 

Bryce, .A. H 125 

Bryce Brothers Company 125 

Brvce, J. M 125 

Bullers. Joseph 182 

Bumbaugh. W. S 233 

Bumer, Frank 253 

Burk, George 54^ 

Burns, Daniel 391 

Bussard. W. H 193 

Butler, Daniel T 480 

Buttermore. Sinith 214 

Byerly, Charles W 87 

Byers, Noah 1 77 

Ca dwell. John D 438 

Ci ipbell, John G 560 

Ca-Miahan, Charles B 541 



VI 



IXDEX. 



PAGE 

Cams, William M 177 

Carpenter, James M 217 

Carroll, James 105 

Carroll, James C 607 

Carson, Albert J 635 

Caven, A. H 196 

Chichester, Frederick W 36 

Clifford, Abram B 246 

Clifford, Edward 246 

Clifford, Edward M 246 

Clifford Fainily 245 

Clifford, Josepii 246 

Cochran, Robert H 564 

Cochrane, James 578 

Coldsmith, Charles F I43 

Cole, Price J 389 

Connor. Charles 593 

Connor, Peter M 595 

Cooper, Kenneth 640 

Cort, Nevin A 174 

Corwin, JMyron 310 

Coshey, Harry D 106 

Cowan, Walter H 297 

Cox, George W 199 

Craig, Andrew 545 

Craig Family 408 

Crawford, George W 517 

Crawford, John W 329 

Creighton, John H 266 

Cribbs, James C 404 

Crise, Blair F 343 

Crowell, Charles C 440 

Crumley, Robert 367 

Curtis, Francis M 182 

Daily Independent 234 

Dalbey. Erank R 588 

Darr. Adam T 223 

Davies. R. W 307 

Davis, Henry E 527 

Davis, John D 517 

Davis, Philip H 291 

Davis, William N 100 

Dawson, Garrett W 536 

DeHaven, Dennis E 352 

Denman, David M no 

Denman, Everet N no 

Dewalt, Jacob 347 

Dice, Samuel S 322 

Diirstein, Edward L 350 

Dillinger, Samuel 117 

Diskin, Thomas J t57 

Dom, William T., Jr g2 

Donaldson, William 55 

Dorn, George n 

Dorn, Louis T 12 

Dougherty, Joseph T 55S 

Douglass, James E 259 

Duff, Leonard J 109 

Dugan, Wilmer G 197 

Dullinger, Frank S '51 

Dunn. James T 42 

Ehalt, Charles F 54 

Eicher, Alexander 77 



PAGE 

Eicher, John F 171 

Eicher, Lewis R 172 

Eiseman, Cameron H 475 

E.iseman, William H 565 

Elkin, William 218 

Ellis, Robert 195 

Erickson, William D 570 

Euwer, A. N 187 

Euwer Family 185 

Euwer, R. A 186 

Euwer, William F 210 

Feather, Walter H 627 

Felgar, George B. McC 612 

Ferguson, William 167 

Findley, Andrew B 354 

Findley, Lloyd S 13 

Fleming, Alexander 215 

Flemm, Charles M 492 

Flyte, Guy B 467 

Fogg, Charles H 49 

Foight Family 85 

Foight, John G ii? 

France, Claud D 603 

Francis, Evan J 557 

Frank Family 305 

Frank, John H 306 

Franklin, Herbert E 639 

Frantz, William 235 

Freeble. James L 253 

Freeman, John 175 

Fretts, Abraham 640 

Frost, James 319 

Fry, Charles S '. 280 

Frye, Edward M -. 227 

Fullertou, Byram M 509 

Fullerton, Nathan N 50S 

Funk, Cyrus M 98 

Funk Family 45.H 

Funk, William G 454 

Gaither, Paul H 31 

Gallagher, James FI 10 

Gallagher, Thomas F n 

Gardner, James 538 

Garwood, Emor M 105 

Gay, Freeman C 75 

Geyer, Andrew J 153 

Geyer, John C 353 

Gilbert Family 471 

Gilbert, Levi T 200 

Gilland, James E 65 

Gilligan, John 295 

Girt, Silas M .59S 

Glassburn, Samuel G 552 

Glinz, August . 39i 

<joehring. Christian 232 

Goehring, Frederick 232 

Gongaware, Lewis W. ^ 524 

Good, Frank 60 

Good, George W 59 

Goodenow, Purley M 560 

■ Goodlin, John F 81 

Gosser, Adam 54<> 

Graham, Israel M 3^2 



IXDEX. 



vu 



PAGE 

Graham, R. F 44i 

Greenawalt, Jacob \V 239 

Grecnawalt, Rebecca 239 

Greer, Clarence W 242 

Gregg, Curtis H 128 

Gribbin, James 152 

Griffith, David 34° 

Griffith, George R 357 

Groft, William A 547 

Guffey, John C 530 

Guy, Henry U 116 

Guy, John 115 

Haines, Tobias 616 

Halliman, Michael E 229 

Hamilton, Samuel \V 442 

Hamor, George D 179 

Hargnett, John 121 

Hargrave, Frank B 271 

Harkins, James 335 

Harkness, George \V 434 

Harman, John A 45° 

Harrold Family 581 

Harrold, Henrv C 606 

Harrold, Samuel L 582 

Harshey, John F 425 

Harvey. David F 309 

Hawk. George W 623 

Hawthorne, Andrew 248 

Hayden, John R 57 

Havmaker. John C 59© 

Head Family 375 

Head. John B 376 

Head. Joseph C 377 

Head. William S 37^ 

Heasley. John G 554 

Heckmann. Oswald 465 

Heffelfinger. Parker F 622 

Heimbergcr, William 537 

Henrv, Francis E 449 

Henry, Harry T 637 

Henry, James C 123 

Henry, "Paul 633 

Hensel. .Albert C 274 

Hensel, William A 109 

Herbert, Robert W 435 

Herrick, Herman 483 

Herrmann. Philipp 277 

Hershev, W'Hlliam 579 

Hill, Charles M 618 

Hine Family 539 

Hine. Jacob M 539 

Hine, Thomas D 539 

Hissem. Reuben K 351 

Hitchman, James S 187 

Mitchman, William J 263 

Hodgson, Robert 537 

Hoffman, Charles M 604 

Hoffman, Charles W 298 

Holtzer, Charles L 205 

Hoofring, Erick L 519 

Hopkinson, James W 292 

Hornc, George R 599 

Horner, Myers W 144 



P.\GE 

Horton, Joseph C 390 

Houseman, Frank 400 

Houseman, Marietta 20 

Houser, John J 137 

Howard. John L. . . 206 

(Howard, William J 455 

Howell, George W 118 

Hoyman, Michael D 501 

Hudson, David P lor 

Hudson. William 621 

Hudson, William M 41 

Huey, George W 417 

Huff, George F i 

Huff. Lloyd B 67 

Huffman. E. P 55r 

Hugg, Jules 563 

Hughes, John W 238 

Hugus. George R 621 

Hunger, George A 412 

Hunter, John A 560 

Hunter. William D 249 

Huntley, Thomas A 574 

Hurst Family 161 

Hurst. Harry R 163 

Hurst, William P 163 

Huston, John W 35S 

Hutchinson. Amos K 55 

Hutchison. Alexander F 615 

Hutton, David S 2S1 

Jamison Family 37 

Jamison, Robert S 37 

Jaquette, Charles H 202 

Jarrett, Henry D ,^45 

Johnson, George H 443 

Johnston, Samuel D 494 

Johnston, \V. W 47 

Jones. Daniel W 284 

Jones, Edwin . . . : 251 

Jones, Sanniel 230 

,Jones, Samuel S ." 238 

Jones, William B., Sr 275 

Jordan, Henry J 145 

Jordan. Johnston B 389 

,Kahl, John S^ 

Kalp. J. Lloyd T40 

Kaufman, Albert S 190 

Ktaggy. Henry L 104 

Keating. James 563 

Keck. Frederick L 174 

Keck. Johann M 4C3 

Keck, Leonard 63 

Keefe, Thomas 574 

Keenan. Edward W' 262 

Keller, Eugene -A. 3,39 

Keller, Joseph P 125 

Kellv. Michael 475 

Kellv. Michael J 476 

Keltz, William B 616 

Kenly. Edward B 69 

Kennedy. James L 68 

Keimedy. John W =85 

Kenn.sl, Jonas M '. 207 



vm 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Kenney, Theodore C 169 

Kepple, Michael 587 

Kern, Daniel M 357- 

Kilgore, John P 415 

King, John H 55 

Kissell, Edwin R 139 

Kline, Amos B 52 

Kline. John J 456 

Klingensmith, Joseph F no 

Koffltr, Valentine 398 

Koontz, Lloyd 148 

KreU, Philip ' 50 

Krick, Henry J 390 

Kromer, Nicholas 197 

Knhn Family 418 

Kuhns, John B 410 

Kuhns. Ralph B 221 

Kunkle, Cyrus F 411 

Kunkle, Daniel 42 

Kunkle, Elmer A 649 

Kunkle, John E 648 

Kunkle. J. L 435 

Kyle, Edmund M ; 318 

Laird. Francis V 462 

Laird. James M 457 

Laird. Thomas 491 

Lamhing. M. A 218 

Landymore. James W 6.38 

Lange, Henry 296 

Larimer, John R 510 

Latimore, William J 267 

Latta. John 18 

Lauffer, Edward C 507 

Lauffcr. Jerry 549 

Laughlin. William J 386 

Lehman. Samuel B 482 

Leighty. Mrs. J. H 175 

Lemmon, Dayton 332 

Lcmmon. James Q 285 

Leslie, Alexander 183 

Lcvenstein, B. E ■ 611 

Lewellyn, Fred ]\I 206 

Lightcap, John S > 304 

Lindquist. Oscar 543 

Lock, John W 600 

Logan, James L 605 

Long, Cyrus T 107 

Long, J. K 99 

Loop. Samuel C 551 

Loucks. Aaron 445 

Loucks, Ahraham S 445 

Loucks, E. Ralph 446 

Loucks Family 443 

Loucks, Martin S 444 

Loughrev, James E 36 - 

Love, Joseph P 137 

Love, Rohert S 405 

Lowe, Lester L 194 

Lowry, Charles A 321 

Lowry, Samuel O. W 16 

Lyle. David M 126 

Lyrch, Harry . . . .' 573 



P.\GE 

Lyon, Robert A. F 12 

Lytle, M. A 32r 

Macbeth, Clarence W 216 

Mabon, James 1 448 

Maier, Louis 290 

Maloy, Patrick J 155 

Marklc, Cyrus 629 

Marsh, Daniel T 401 

Ma,rtin, Tliomas C 628 

Martz Family 97 

Martz, George W 98 

Mason, Clark S C13 

Mathias, J. Michael 634 

Mayers, William K 647 

McAllister, Frank J 399 

McCaleb, John D 127 

McCann, Peter F 179 

McCarty, David H 181 

McCarty, William 506 

McConaughy, Francis 338 

McConnell, Alexander D 13 

McConnell, Harriet S 455 

McConnell, John N 79 

McCreary, John 139 

McCullogh, Welty 131 

McCune, James 502 

McCurdy, Joseph A ■. 6 

McDonald, Charles R 556 

McFarland, John .361 

McFadyen, John W 64t 

McGeary, Martin N ' 6(5 

M'clntire, Samuel P 477 

Mclntyre, John H (,9 

McKcan, Hugh C 642 ' 

McKean, Robert J 325 

McKelvey, Samuel M 176 

McMahon, Cassius C 515 

McMa,ster, Joseph W , 296 

McMuIlen, Joseph H 452 

McMurray, Humphrey L 359 

McNaughton, William 143 

McNutt. Albert M 523 

McNutt, David O ....283 

McNutt, Robert W 513 

McQuilkin, Robert R 624 

Mellon. Thomas '. . . . 407 

Menoher. John F ^2^ 

Menoher. Watson A \ 32S 

Miller Brothers 192 

Miller, Clifford E 192 

Miller, Elwood 326 

Miller, Irwin C IQ2 

Mitinger, John F 60 

Mitinger, Joseph E 62 

Mitinger. William L 6r 

Momeyer, Charles E 554 

Moody, John W I55 

Moore, John W lOO 

Mcore, Morrison R 294 

Moorhead, James S 48 

Morgan. William T 631 

IMorrison. Harry T 532 



IXDEX. 



XI 



PAGE 

Welty, William T lot 

Wcngert, Albert G 511 

Wenrich, Henry E 5H2 

Waitling-Jack Family 4^8 

Weiitling, John F +29 

Workman, Edward 586 

Wherry. Charles O , 449 

\\'lutehead. Peter 533 

Whitesell Family 416 

Whitesell. Harry W 417 

Whitesell, James 540 

^\"hitefell. J. F 417 

Willets, Ambrose 493 

Williams. Albert K 618 

Williams. Daniel M 620 

Williams. Edward V 529 

Williams. Francis M 548 

Wills. Charles T 464 

Willson, Alexander 643 

Wilson, Harry C 416 



P.\GE 

Wilson. John A 544 

Wineman, Gnstavus A . . . 84 

Winenian. Jacob E 208 

Winsheimer. Lawrence 165 

Winsheimer. Thompson R 166 

Wirsing. James J 22 

Witt. Daniel 501 

Wolf. Thnnias F 633 

Woods. Alfred R 189 

Wright. G. F 228 

Yonng, .'Mmon R 293 

Young, Andrew P .■ . 597 

Young, William F 324 

Zahniser, Frank R 67 

Zillmer, Frank W 395 

Zimmerman. Henry R 498 

Zuck. Jacob R 331 



i*ool. 

Pool. J. 



I 



I 

k 



HISTORY.OF WESTMORELAND COL'iMY 

HON. GEORGE ERAXKLIN HUFF, the present member of Con- 
stress from the twentv-first district of Pennsylvania, whose home is in Greens- 
burg, is the son of George Huff HI, and was born July i6th, 1842, at Norris- 
tcwn, Pennsylvania. The history of the Huff (originally von Hoof) family, 
is closelv identified with that of Fjerks county as to its settlement in America. 
Tlieir ancestry is traced in the following from the European List of Heraldry 
and Genealogy in the \'ienna Library, as translated by Gottleib Hausser, of 
Altoona, Pennsylvania. 

"origin of the GEXE.\L0GY of the von hoof FAMILY, 

its first historical notoriety, and further circulation from authentic sources." 

The generation of von Hoof is originally traced to have resided in 
Bavaria, where it did in olden times belong to the Knighthood, free from duties 
to the Empire. It had its permanent estates near the City of Passau. It is 
noted in the \'ienna tables of genealogy as a generation which was famous 
amono-st the Bavarian Knighthood and nobility and the first ancestor was 
Baldwin von Hoof, who dwelled in his own castle, so called from the ancient 
Knights, and he lived in the castle and estate Hoof, situate near Passau. The 
emblem in his shield consisted of a cross-log, signifying that his ancestors were 
princes. At his helmet he wore an emblem resembling a flower pot, a lily 
reaching out from it, which denoted that he was of French extraction. This 
is the origin of the heraldic emblem of this generation, and the emblem yet 
existing can be traced to these tokens on shield and helmet. The maiden name 
of Baldwin's wife was Isabelle von Stolberg. Baldwin came to his death in the 
first crusade in the month of July, A. D., 1099, whilst taking part in the storm- 
ing of Jerusalem. He only left one son, whose name was Waldemar, who also 
took part in the crusade, but escaped with his life and safely arrived in Ger,- 
many. After fighting for several years as a brave Knight in the Orient, he 
united himself in the bonds of matrimony with Julia von Helmhorst. and the 
Duke of Piavaria appointed him governor of the City of Aua:sburg. \\'aldemar 
died A. D. 1154, and left their sons, Julius, Ernst and Wolfgang von Hoof. 
Julius took possession of the family castle, but his generation died out and 
ceased to exist already in the fourteenth century. Wolfgang preferred the 
divine profession, and died as Bishop of Ortia in Italy. 

Ernst was a warrior, and served for a long time in the army of the Ger- 
man Emperor. Fredericus Barbarossa. who, in consideration of his services, 
endowed him with an estate in the \'al!ev of the Rems, Lower Suavia, and who 
also renewed the old title of nobility and emblematical heraldry, confirmed bv 
letter and approved, as can be seen in the record of Heraldry in the City of 
Vienna, and this document, which has been issued in Mayence in the vear 

1 172, is renewing the above title of privileges. Ernst flourished in Lower 
2—1 



HJSTORy OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



Suavia, and his posterity is found up to the year A. D. 1348, hut in that vear 
they fell victims of an epideniic disease which had come from Asia, and was 
like a pestilence, commonly called the 'black death,' and only one, Rudoljih von 
Hocf, remained alive, but the original estate was already in other hands, and 
Count Ebcrhard der Greiner, of Wurtemberg, employed him ar woodrangcr. 
He was stationed at Aichelbcrg, and his wife's maiden name was JVlechtdde 
von Stadion. He died in Schorndorf at a very old age in 1394, and left four 
sons, but only one of them, Elias vcii Hoof, marriccl, a Christine Junginger. 
He purchased an estate in the vicinity of Schorndorf, and lived there with his 
wife a very peaceable life. He did not regard his old title of nobility, and his 
descendants followed the culture of grapes and husbandry. 

In the Peasant's War all the sons of Hoof's lost their lives in the 
battle at Roeblingen, except Elam, who was subseciuently magistrate at Pleidel- 
sheim. He was married to Anna JMaria Gessler of .Besigheim, and died, well 
advanced in years, A. D. 1567. His two sons' names were Johann Anton and 
Jacob Friedrich vcii Hoof. Johann Anton's descendants removed to. Graub- 
uendten during the thirty years' War, and from that time no account could be 
had of them. 

Jacob Frederick settled down in rjcsigbeim as merchant and inn- 
keeper, and married Elizabeth Dietcrich. He died in the year 1602. His son 
Justus von Hoof served in the Spanish .\rmy for a long time and also took 
an active part in the campaigns in the Netherlands, Italy and Germany, and 
finally settled d< wn in the City of Lauffen, on the Neckar. where he married 
(jertrude Loeffler. He died in the year 1652, and left three sons, whose names 
were Conrad, Wilhclm and George von Hoof. The descendants of these sons 
have sjjread over Wm'tembcrg and liaden and one of them, Wilhelm, owing 
to a great famine which wSs prevailing in Wurtemberg in 1771, moved away 
and emigrated, no doubt to America, but no certain accounts of the further 
fate of the family could be obtained. 

I. John Frederick von Hoof, son of Paul von Hoof, was born in Berling, 
Germany, July 8, 1734, and when a young man emigrated to America. On 
October 25, 1757, he was married to Susanna, a daughter of John and Mary 
Elizabeth 'Keim. He was a farmer by occupation and a Lutheran in religion. 
Not regarding the family title he droped the von and since 1840 the 
name in America has been .spelled "Huff." John Frederick Hoof died April 
26, t8i6, and was buried in the old graveyard on Ranch's farm on the road 
leading from Seisholtzville to Huff's Church, the latter being in Herfcrd town- 
ship. Berks county. His wife, Susanna, died May 12, 1809, aged 69 years, 
and was buried in the same place. By their marriage the following children 
were born : Frederick, George, Henry, Susanna, with other sons and daughters. 
Susanna was married to Abraham Mensch, of Herford township. 

II. George Huff, son of John Frederick, and the grandfather of the Hon- 
orable George F. Huff, of Greensburg, was born August i, 1779, at Hufif's 
Church. Fie was a farmer and a hotel keeper and of the Lutheran religious 
faith as had been his father. He was married to Anna IMull, by whom the 
following named children were born : Lydia, married James Bartram ; Hettie, 
married Charles ^IcNuIty : Maria, married David Sassman ; and George 
George Huff II. was liberal in his donations to the Church, and gave the prem- 
ises upon which was built Huff's Church and also the land used for burial pur- 
poses. He died February 24th, 1845. 

III. George Huff, IV, son of George Huff III, was born at Huff's 
Church in 1813. He was married to Caroline Boyer and they were the par- 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTV. 



•ents of George Franklin Huff. He was a merchant and first lived at Huff's 
Church, and in 1840 moved to Norristown, and from there to Middletown, in 
Dauphin County, and live years later removed to Altoona, Pennsylvania. He 
died in 1858. 

The maternal genealogy of Hon. George F. Huff is as follows : 

I. ^lichael George Kuhns (Kunzen-Koons) left Germany and arrived 
in Philadelphia on September 27, 1727, and purchased a tract of land adjoining 
that owned by Ludwig Eiiglehart in ^Montgomery county. On April ist, 1732, 
he was married to Eva Englehart. The last will of Ludwig Englehart sets 
forth among other things, the following: "Also the seven children of my 
sister, Eva. wife of George M. Kuhns, namely, Frederick; Mary, wife of John 
Stelles ; r^Iargaret, wife of Johannes Reimer ; Susanna, wife of John Ludwig 
Reimer ; Catharine Kuntz, wife of ^Michael Kreps ; and Elizabeth, wife of Jacob 
Seaber (Zeiber)." George j\L Kuhns died in Montgomery county August 
loth, 1759, and Eva, his wife, died at the same place June 27, 1772. 

H. Catharine Kuhns, daughter of George M. and Eva Kuhns (I) was 
born February 9, 1750, at "The Old Tavern," in jMontgcmery count}-. She 
was married to ^Michael Kreps and they were the parents of eight children. 
IMichael Kreps was born Janu^iry 23, 1744, and died April 20, 1791. After 
his death his widow married James Reichard ( Richard ) and died Januarv 6, 
1814. and was buried at Swamp Church in Montgomery county. The chil- 
dren born to them were : Catharine, Henry, Eliza, John, Jacob, .Sarah. Hannah 
and Philip. 

HL Sarah Kreps, daughter of IMichael and Catharine Kuhns-Kreps (II) 
was born February 28. 1784, at New Hanover Square, Mcntgomery countv, 
in a house that was erected in 1754 and is still standing. On March 3, 1800, 
she was married to Henry Boyer, by whom she bore the following children : 
Michael Boyer, born July 10, 1801, and died December 21, 1886; Catharine, 
born January 23, 1803, married to John Rhoads and died in September, 1883 ; 
Elizabeth, born September 29, 1804, married first to John Gressmer, on whose 
death she was married to J. Weidner. She died November 23, 1850. Sarah, 
born February 3, 1807, married Jacob Allebach, and died October 13. -1859; 
Henry, born June 11. 1809, married Nettie Shilling, and died November 17, 
1858: Jacob, born December 21, 181 1, and married Lucy Ludwig, and died 
]\Iarch 17. 1858: Hannah, born December 5, 1813, married Dr. Charles F. Sel- 
lers, and died March 20, 1882: Maria, born June 13, 1816, married Marshall 
B. Campbell, died October 12, 1862; Caroline, born September 5. 1817. married 
■George Huff. HI. and died February 3. 1876: Phihp, born October 27. 1820: 
Angelinc, born February 12, 1822, married Rev. Frederick W. Dechant, and 
died February 4, 1890. 

IV. Caroline Boyer, daughter of Henry and Sarah Kreps-Boyer, born 
September 5, 1817, was married to George Huff and became the mother of 
Hon. George F. Huff. At the date of her marriage her father was Steward 
of the County House of Berks county, at Shillington Post Office. Politically 
he was a Democrat. His father. Jacob Boyer, was born in 17^4 and resided 
in Perkiomenville, ilonteomery county. He had eleven children, including 
Henry. Jacob Boyer died February 11. 1796. 

Henry Boyer, born October 19. 1778, was married to Sarah Kreps. March 
13, 1800. and died March 18, i8s7. He was buried in Boyertown cemetery. 
Fie was a member of the Pennsylvania Legislature, renresenting Berks coimtv 
in the years 1823, 1824. 1825. 1826, and agn.in in 183 r. He was the early 
founder of Boyertown, laid out lots there in 1835, and was instrumental in 
Tnaving it incorporated in 185 r. 



HISTORY OF IVESTMOREL.-IXD COUNTY. 



Michael K. Boyer, brother of Caroline Boycr-Huff, was born in iSoi and 
was also a member of the Legislature frcni Berks county in 1836. lie was 
Prothonotary of the same county in 1848, and was again in the Legislature 
from Jetiferson county in 1855. He held a positicni in the Land Department 
in Washington, D. C, and died December 21, 1886. 

IV. George Franklin Huff, son of George and Caroline Boyer-Huff, is 
widely known as one of the most enterprising and public spirited men in West- 
moreland county, and is closely identified with nearly all of its many industrial 
and financial enterprises. When four years of age he accompanied his parents 
to Middletown, where he attended the ]niblic schools until 1851, when his 
parents moved to Altoona. There he attended the public schools initil seven- 
teen years of age, when he entered the car shops of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company at Altoona and learned the car finisher's trade. So faithful and true 
to every duty was he that three years later he was, without solicitation on his 
part, highly recommended by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company to a bank- 
ing jiouse in Altoona, that of William M. Lloyd and Comjxuiy. He accepted the 
position and in 1865 his employer sent him to h^bensburg to establish a bank 
there. He succeeded remarkably well and a year later was re-called to 
Altoona. 

In 1867 he removed to Greenslnirg, where he established the banking 
house of Lloyd, Huff and Company, known as the Greensburg Deposit Bank, 
and having branches at Latrobe, Irwin, Mount Pleasant and Ligonier. Tlie 
panic of 1873 caused these several institutions to go out of business, but liieir 
pro])erty ])aid their full indebtedness with interest. 

In 1 87 1 ;\lr. Hufif established the Farmers' National Bank of Greensburg 
with a capital stock of one hundred thousand dollars. He was its first presi- 
dent and remained as such until 1874, when he became the active manager of 
the house as its cashier under General Richard Coulter as president. By Act 
of Congress the bank was reorganized as the Fifth National Bank of Pittsburg, 
Mr. Huff being elected its vice-president, which position he held imtil 1876, 
when he resigned. In 1874 he, with others, organized the Greensburg Banking 
Company, wliich soon became a leader in the rural banking business of West- 
ern Pennsylvania. He was cashier of this bank until 1887, during which time 
through his untiring efforts and business sagacity, a very large volume of busi- 
ness was secured. 

In 1881 the First National Bank of Greensburg was chartered, and Mr. 
Huff" became one of its most potent directors, which position he still retains. 
Since then the First National Bank has absorbed the Greensburg Banking 
Company, and has now a larger deposit and surplus than any other institution 
in the county. 

Mr. HufT also became largely interested in the coal and coke industry of 
Westmoreland county. He was the prime mover in organizing the Greens- 
burg Coal Company, the Alexandria Coal Company, Mountain Coal Company, 
the Argsde Coal Company, the L^nited Coal and Coke Company, the Mutual 
]\Iining and Alanufacturing Company, the Manor Gas Coal Company, the Madi- 
son Coal Company, the Salem Coal Company, the Latrobe Coal Company, Car- 
bon Coal Company, and several others. Most of these companies were since con- 
solidated in the Keystone Coal and Coke Company, of which Mr. Huff is presi- 
dent. It and the companies with which he is connected, employ about 7,500 
men and produce now in the neighborhood of six millions of tons of coal per 
year, or twenty thousand tons per day. He was also one of the organizers of 
the Southwest Pennsylvania Railroad Company, the main line of which passes 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 5 

through tlie Connellsville coking coal region, he being its treasurer until the 
offices were removed to Philadelphia. He was one of the founders of the 
Greensburg Electric Street Railway Company, the Greensburg Fuel (artificial 
and natural gas) Ccmpany, and the Greensburg Steel Company. He was 
formerly president of the Greensburg Electric Light and the Westmoreland 
Water Companies. 

The development of the Jeannette natural gas region also felt his potency 
as well as the general upbuilding of that sprightly town. He donated seven 
acres of valuable land for manufacturing purposes at Burrell, a station near 
Greensburg. The thriving towns cf Youngwood, Southwest Greensburg, and 
other outlying sections of Greensburg were laid out largely by his efforts, and 
he has always been financially interested in the Kelly & Jones Company and its 
various improvements. 

He is also a director of the American Surety and Trust Company of Wash- 
ington, D. C, the President of the Westmoreland Hospital Association, and is 
further interested in coal companies outside of the Keystone Coal and Coke 
Company in nearly every section of the bituminous region in Pennsylvania. 

Adjoining Greensburg he has a large landed estate containing about 500 
acres, upon which the family residence is built. It consists of highly cultivated 
farm land and original forest, all of which is beautified by a system of landscape 
gardening and parks ; and through the entire farm there are winding driveways 
of over four miles in length, which are kept up by Mr. Huff and are at all 
times thrown open for the pubHc to enjoy. 

Air. Huff is a progressive Republican. His political career began in 
1880 when, as a member of the Chicago Republican Convention, he was one of 
the 306 who supported General U. S. Grant for a third term as President. In 
1884 he was a candidate for the office of State Senator in the Thirty-ninth Sen- 
atorial District, composed of the County of Westmoreland. He was elected by 
a majority of seven hundred, althciigh the county had for long years been re- 
gfarded as the Danocratic stronghold of the West. Since then the county has 
been generally Republican. 

In 1888 Mr. Huff was nominated for Congress by the Republicans of 
Westmoreland county, but another was selected under the conferee system. 
In 1890 he was chosen as Congressional candidate by the Republicans in the 
district and elected by a large majority, representing the counties of Westmore- 
land. Indiana, Armstrong and Jefferson. He served in Congress until 1893, 
and in 1894 was elected Congressman-at-Large from Pennsylvania. In 1902, 
1904 and 1906 he was returned to Congress, and now represents the counties of 
\Vestmoreland and Butler. During his service in the National House of 
Representatives, Air. Huff has proved his ability to well represent the large 
and varied interests of his constituents, and no member of Congress from the 
Commonwealth stands higher than he. He is now prominently mentioned as 
a candidate for the Governorship in 1906. 

On March 16, 1871, Air. Huff was united in marriage with Henrietta 
Burrell, a daughter of the late Jeremiah AI. Burrell. twice President Judge of 
the Tenth Judicial District of Pennsylvania, and later United States District 
Judge for the Territory of Kansas. ludge Burrell died at Greensburg, Octo- 
iaer 21. 1856. (See sketch of Judge TUirrell in that part of the first volume of 
this series relative to the Westmoreland Bench). 

Air. and Airs. Huff are the parents of eight children, four of whom are 
living, namely, Lloyd Burrell, Julian Burrell, Carolyn Burrell and Burrell 
Richardson. 



6 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

JOSEPH ALEXANDER McCURDY, a leading member of the 
Westmoreland county bar, residing at Greensburg, Pennsylvania, comes of 
Scotch, Scotch-Irish and English ancestry. He was born in Derry township, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, Friday, December ii, 1857, the second 
son of Alexander J. and Sarah (Pounds) McCurdy. 

In an open boat, during the days of religious persecution in Scotland, 
were five brothers escaping by a dangerous voyage from Galloway to the coast 
of Down, Ireland. These true hearted men were named McCurdy, and from 
one of them Joseph A. McCurdy is descended. The Mayflower, which crossed 
the Atlantic in 1620. contained one of his paternal ancestors and two of his 
maternal ancestors. His grandmother, Mary Doty, descended from Edward 
Doty, who was one of the_ forty-one men who signed his name to the first con- 
stitution of government ever subscribed by a whole people in the history of 
the world. Mr. McCurdy's mother, Sarah Pounds, descended from Thomas 
Pounds, who in 1635 came from London to New England, and his wife was one 
of the children who came in the Mayflower. William Drummond, who came- 
from Scotland to New Jersey, had among his grandchildren Mary Drummond,. 
the maternal grandmother of Mr. McCurdy. The maternal great-grandmother 
was Sarah Collier, descendant of William Collier, a London merchant, who 
came to America in 1633 and was assistant governor of Plymouth colony for 
thirtv vears. The great-great-grandmothers on the paternal side were Hannah 
Cannon, wife of Stephen A. Pounds, and Ella Cannon, wife of William Drum- 
mond. Three of his great-grandfathers, Alexander McCurdy, Joseph Pounds- 
and Nathaniel Doty, were in the War for Independence, and two of his great- 
great-grandfathers. Stephen A. Pounds and William Drummond, were killed 
in that struggle. For more than a century, Mr. McCurdy's ancestors have re- 
sided in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. 

Alexander jNIcCurdv, the great-grandfather, w-as born in Leister, Ireland, 
1744; came to America in 1756, settling on the banks of "Crooked Creek," in 
Westmoreland county, (now included within Indiana county). Subsequently 
he lived near the Salt Works, on the Conemaugh river. He died near Liver- 
more, aged ninety-four years. He was a Revolutionary soldier in Captain 
Matthew Scott's Company, Thirteenth Pennsylvania Regiment, and was 
wounded in both arms in Yorktown and became a pensioner. For a short time 
he accompanied his son Samuel in the War of 1812, and was employed in 
training soldiers in military exercises. He possessed considerable wealth, was 
a noted musician, a strict seceder and well known for his knowledge of the 
scriptures. He was married about 1785 to Jane Heridenon, by whom were 
born: U'illiam, Alexander H., Andrew, Samuel, Keziah,- Ann and Jane. 

Alexander Henderson McCurdy, the grandfather of J. A. McCurdy, was 
born at Crooked Creek, 1794. He was a farmer and carpenter. He was a 
pump manufacturer for many years. He owned the "Piper Farm." near 
Latrobe, where he resided many years previous to his death in 185 1. About 
1820 he married Mary Doty, by whom was born : Samuel Henderson, Nath- 
aniel; Alexander Jackson, Mary, Phoebe and Jane. The mother of these 
children, Mary (Doty) McCurdy, was born in 1793 and died 1887. She was a 
lineal descendant of Edward Doty, who came in the Mayflower. Rev. Francis- 
Doty (son of Edward) was a minister in the first settlement of Taunton, ]\Ias- 
sachusetts. For utterances contrarv to some of the Pilgrim Fathers' practices, 
he was driven to Long Island in 161 t. The Dutch settlement issued a patent 
to him, "for a Colonic, Messpath Kill, twenty-eight of March. 1642." Some 
of his descendants settled in New Jersey. Three of these, Nathaniel, Jonathan 



HISTORY OF irESTMOREL.lXD COUXTY 



and Zebulon Dotv, sons of Xathaniel Doty, Sr.. (grcat-grcat-grandlathcr) set- 
tled in Derry township, Westmoreland county, about 1785. 

Nathaniel Doty, Jr., (great-grandfather), born 1757, died in 1844: he 
had served in the Revolutionary war. He married Jane Cethoven, and one of 
their children, jNIary, was married to Alexander H. AlcCurdy, whose third son, 
Alexander Jackson ^IcCurdy, father of J, A, McCurdy, was born in Derry 
township, June 4, 1829. He was a farmer and was for some time in the employ 
of the Pennsylvania canal and later engaged in the ccnstruction of the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad. Politically he was an active Republican, He died September 
2, 1S84. He married Rachel Lightcaj), who died in 1852, leaving a 
daughter, INIary Susan, born February 22. 1852, who was married to 
\\'illiam Fishell, and died in August, 1880, ]\lr. !\lcCurdy married (second), 
in 1854, Sarah Pounds, born ^lay 12, 1S33, eldest daughter of Joseph and 
Mary (Drumond) Pounds, By the union of Alexander Jackson McCurdy 
and Sarah Pcamds, seven children were born : Rev. Irwin Pounds, D, D, ; 
Joseph A., see forward: Hannah Alay, deceased; John Druiiiniond; Ella S, ; 
William \\', and ^linnie ]\Iay, 

Jose]jh A. McCurdv was reared midst the rural scenes of his father's home 
in Derry township, and attended the common schools. During 1869-70 he re- 
ceived valuable instructions from Rev. W. H. McFarland. After attending 
the State Xormal school at Edinbcro, Pennsylvania, one term, he commenced 
teaching when but sijcteen years of age. He obtained his education by teaching 
winters and attending school summers. He graduated from the State Xormal 
school at Indiana, Pennsylvania, in 1878, He was a student in the classical 
courses, first in the University of Wooster, Ohio, then in Lafayette College, 
Easton. Pennsylvania, in 1879-80, He was principal of the schools at Mount 
Pleasant, Pennsylvania, in 1880-81, and became one of the owners and the 
editor of the Mount Pleasant Dozen, which he changed to the Journal. He 
improved and greatly enlarged the circulation of that paper, but after two years 
relinquished the editorial chair for his life-work in the legal profession. Mr. 
McCurdy became a law student in the office of Moorhead & Head_, at Greens- 
burg, Pennsylvania, Ajiril, 188,3. ^\ hile thus studying he was principal of the 
Greensburg High School one term. He was admitted to the Westmoreland 
county bar August 31, 1885, and soon gained a lucrative i)ractice. He has 
been solicitor for his county and attorney in many important law cases. He 
was district attorney of Westmoreland ccainty from 1892 to 1895, bcin,g the 
first Republican elected to that office. He is the senior member of the law firm 
of McCurdy and Cunningham. He was chairman of the Republican county 
committee in 1886, when Hon. Welty McCullougli was elected to congress. 
In his church connections he is a member of die First Presbvterian church of 
Greensburg. He has been a director of the Westmoreland Hospital Associa- 
tion of Greensburg since its organization. Mr. ^IcCurdy was married, Sep- 
tember 10, 1885, to Jane Brady Armstrong, daughter of Col, James and Rachel 
(Welty) Armstrong, of Greensburg. She died February 28, 1888, leaving an 
infant, Rachel Welty, who survived her but five months. Mr. McCurdy was 
married, June 29, 1897, to Florence Ludwick, daughter of Humphrey Fuller- 
ton and Josephine Cort (Zimmerman) Ludwick, of Manor. I'eniisvlvania, 

BOUCHER FA:\IILY. The name Boucher is purely of French 
origin, although the first ancestor in .America spoke the German language. 
This was likely brought about by the family being among the Huguenots, who 
were banished from France by the Revocation of the E(lict of Xantes in idSs, 



8 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

Otherwise he could scarcely have come to America with a French name and a 
German tongue. But this is entirely speculative and tlic family has long been 
recognized as distinctively Pennsylvania German. It was a numerous one in 
Westmoreland ccamty half a century or more ago, particularly in Ligonicr 
Vallcv. but they who bore that name then are nearly all gone now, and their 
descendants are scattered throughout the western states. 

I. Daniel Boucher, the founder of the family in America, came from the 
German States of France, most likely from Loraine. The tradition is that he 
crossed the Atlantic ocean in a ship called the "President." In his Bible, 
which the writer has seen, he wrote that he, with his wife and children, landed 
at Philadel])hia on June 2Cth, 1755. They settled in Berks county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in what is now known as Albany township, where he purchased lands 
and became a farmer. The location is twenty-two miles from the city of 
Reading, on the present railroad leading from Reading to Slatington. He was 
of the German Reformed faith in religion, and was mainly instrumental in 
erecting a church edifice called "Bethel," near his home. It has been rebiult 
three times, but still retains the name given it by its pioneer founder. Little 
is known of him further than that he lost heavily in the Revolution, that lie 
died in the early years of last century, and that his remains were buried in 
the churchvard near the church which he built. He had sons named Peter, 
William, Philip, Jacob and Henry. Peter died without issue ; William settled 
in Ross county, Ohio, in 1801 ; Philip remained with his father and fell heir 
to his estate, much of which still remains in the name of his descendants ; and 
Jacob settled in Schuvlkill county. 

n. Henry Boucher, youngest son of Daniel Boucher, was born in Berks 
countv. March 10, 1759. He was married to Mary Shoemaker, and removed 
to Hamburg, Pennsylvania, where he became a farmer and shoemaker. In 
1801, in company with a neighbor named Jacob Will, he started west on horse- 
back for the purpose of purchasing lands and moving on them. They rode as 
far as the Miami Valley in Ohio" but there the fever and ague prevailed to 
such an alarming extent that tliey returned, ai^id upon reaching Somerset 
coimtv, Pennsvlvania, purchased lands, to which they moved with their fam- 
ilies in the spring of 1802. The land bought by Henry Boucher is about three 
miles from Glade. There were four hundred and fifty acres in the tract, and 
it was conveyed to him by John Gross. He spent the remainder of his days 
there as a farmer and died on November 19, 1834. His \yife, Mary Shoe- 
maker, who was born January 22, 1762, survived him until May 12, 1840. 
They are both buried in the cemetery at Glade, and the dates given are taken 
from their tombstones. Their children were : Jacob, Henry, Christian, David, 
Solomon, John, Elizabeth, Magdalene, Mary, Rebecca, Catharine, Sarah and 
Hannah. Christian died in his youth. Henry, Solomon and John brought up 
large families and lived and died in Somerset county. Hannah married Jere- 
miah Strawn, who removed to Ottawa, Blinois, and was the ancestor of that 
branch of the Strawn family. 

HI. David Boucher, son of Henry Boucher (2). was born in Haiuburg, 
Pennsylvania, November 12, 1789, and when twelve years old came with his 
parents to Somerset county. He was bred a farmer, and acquired land in 
Turkevfoot township. On 'May 19, 1814, he was married to ]\Iary Eve Fried- 
line, who was born August 23, 'i794- They were the parents of a large family. 
There were two daughters: Elizabeth, who died when quite young: and Susan, 
who was married to Abraham Brant, of Ligonier \'alley, and with a large fam- 
ily survived her husband manv years. Their sons were: Daniel, died in Ilh- 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTV 



iiois ; Hiram, to whom \vc will refer hereafter ; Josiah, Isaac and David, who 
died in California ; Henry, who new resides in Kansas ; and John and Simon, 
■who died in that state! Hiram alone remained in Ligonier \'alley, all the 
•others except Simon having gone to California in search of gold soon after its 
•discovery. 

In 1833 David Boucher removed from Somerset county to Ligonier, pur- 
chased lands near that place from William Ross, and became a very successful 
farmer. His wife, Alary Eve, died at Ligonier on January 11, 1842. David 
was a man of deep convictions, and manifested great earnestness in any cause 
which enlisted his attention. In politics he was a Whig, and later a Repub- 
lican. He was most noted, however, in church work, being a Methodist of the 
old style, and by no means lax in supporting his church and in upholding its 
principles. On November 11, 1844, he was married to !\Irs. Sarah Stahl, to 
whom the following children were born : Charles Wesley ; Lucius Cha])man ; 
Emma, married John ^^'ood ; and Anna, married Morgan Beam ; they and their 
descendants live in and near Pittsburg. David Boucher died April 12, 1868, 
and his second wife survived him until !Marcli, 1887. 

I\". Hiram, son of David Boucher (3) and Alary Eve, was born in .Som- 
erset county. December 7, 1821, and came to Ligonier \'alley with his parents 
in 1833. (Jn January 26, 1843, he was married to Abigail Slater, of Lig- 
onier township, by Rev. Stevens. He united with the Alethodist Episcopal 
church of Ligonier, and was one of its leading members thrciighout the re- 
mainder of his life. He was especially a potent factor in the Sunday school 
work of the church, and taught a class of both old and young men for more 
than a quarter of a century. Few men were more competent for this work 
than he. Though, like many others in the first half of the last century, he had 
received but a limited education in his youth, yet, being more or less of a life- 
long reader, he became well versed in the Bible, and was familiar with many 
of the books relating to it, and in this line of thought he had few equals among 
the laity of his ccmmunity. He spent his entire life as a farmer in Ligonier 
\'alley. and died of bilious fever October 18, 1889. Abigail Slater, his wife, 
was born in Donegal township, January 13, 1822, daughter of Samuel and 
Mary Show Slater. The first ancestor of the Slater family came from Eng- 
land and became a resident and farmer in Donegal township during the Revo- 
lution cr shortly afterward. He had three sons Martin, Samuel and Isaac. 
Alartin built and managed Alount Hope Furnace, situated two miles southeast 
•of Donegal. Samuel and Isaac were farmers in that township. Isaac was mar- 
ried to Abigail Ulrey shortly after the Revolution. In volume I of this work 
will be foimd the story of the escape of Abigail Ulery and her sister from the 
Indians during the Revolutionary war. She was born December 29, 1765, 
and was brought up on the Slater farm near Lig-onier. LTpon her marriage 
"vvith Isaac Slater they removed to Donegal township, where thev lived the re- 
mainder of their lives. Isaac Slater died in 1836, and his wife Abigail sur- 
vived him until October 29, 1855, when she died in her ninety-second year. 

The sons of Isaac Slater and Abigail Celery were Joseph a.nd Samuel. The 
latter born February 2. 1794. He was their third child, and was married to 
Mary Show, who was born in Maryland, March 14, i860, and was brought up 
near Connellsville, Pennsylvania. In 1824 Samuel and Mary Slater removed 
from Donegal township, having purchased lands two miles southwest of Lig- 
onier, from the Ulery heirs, one of whom was .Abigail, Samuel Slater's mother. 
L'pon this land, now known as the Slater farm, thev resided the remainder of 
their days. Mary Show Slater died on June 27, iS7r). and her husband Sam- 



]0 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY 



iicl survived her until January 30. 1882. Both are buried in the Brant ceme- 
tery, near their old home. Their children were Abigail, Julia, Christenia, Isaac, 
Catharine, Sarah and Mary. It was Abigail, the oldest of the family who was. 
married to Hiram Boucher. Though past four-score years and four, she sdll 
survives him, and resides near Ligonier. 

The children of Hiram Boucher and Abigail Slater were: Elizabeth, mar- 
ried to Dr. J. T. Ambrose, of Ligonier; Mary Eve, married to William C. 
Knox, of Ligonier township, died April 15, 1892; Amanda, married to Hamil- 
ton Smith, of Ligonier, (Mr. Smith died August 7, 1897) ; Caroline, married 
to Rev. O. A. Emerson, of the Pittsburgh Methodist Episcopal Conference ; 
Sarah, married to Hugh M. Clififord, of Derry, died January 11, 1887; Kate, 
married to Dr. Edward Al. Clifford, of Greensburg; David WHbert, died in 
1863, aged two years ; and John Newton, of Greensburg. 

V. John Newton Boucher was a teacher in the Westmoreland schools, and 
was graduated from Mount Union College at Alliance, Ohio, in 1876. He is 
a member of the Greensburg bar, and the author of the Westmoreland portion 
of the "Twentieth Century Bench and Bar of I'ennsylvania," published by 
Cooper Brothers, of Chicago, 1903, and of the historical narratives cciitained 
in volume I of this work, entitled "A History of Westmoreland County." 

VL The sixth generation of this family are the children of Dr. J. T. 
Ambrose and wife; of William C. Knox and wife, Mary; of Rev. O. A. Emer- 
son and wife; Lillian, daughter of Hugh M. Clififord and wife Sarah, and the 
daughter of Dr. Edward M. Clifford and wife. 

VH. The seventh generation are the children of William and Alaigail 
Knox Graham, of Ligonier Valley ; of Dr. A. H. Caven and Blanche Emerson 
Caven of Youngwood, Pennsylvania ; and of Charles Emerson and Sallie Luke 
Emerson of Creighton, Pennsylvania. 

JAMES HENRY GALLAGHER, the present recorder of deeds for 
Westmoreland county, was born November 23, 1867, at New Alexandria, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania. He is the son of General Thomas F. Gal- 
lagher and Elizabeth Kier McBride Gallagher, his wife. She was daughtei of 
Henry and Elizabeth McBride, of Loyalhanna township, Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania. 

To better acquaint the reader with the progenitors of Mr. Gallagher it 
may be said that the first to come to America, was Thomas Gallagher (i), 
born in Donegal county, Ireland, July 28, 1750. He died February 21, 1844, 
near Pleasant Unity, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, aged ninety-four 
years. He was buried in the LTnity Presbyterian graveyard. He married Isa- 
belle Mcllhaney, daughter of James Mcllhane}', of Ireland. She died January 
14, 1817, and was buried in the same church yard in which her husband was 
buried. They came from Ireland in 1810, landing in Baltimore, May 10, of 
that year and after visiting the Pattersons and other relatives of that section, 
they came over the mountains in "Mountain Wagons" to Greensburg, tirst 
settling in Washington township, but later in Unity. In Ireland, Mr. Gal- 
lagher w-as an under-landlord and the proprietor of an inn. He was captain 
of volunteers under the king in his native country. The children of this: 
American ancestor — Thomas Gallagher and wife, were : James, Thomas, died 
unmarried at Harrisburg, Penns\lvania, and was buried in the Episcopal cem- 
etery of that city, where a suitable monument marks his resting place. Major 
George, John. Mary Ann and Isabella, who died on board ship, aged ten years. 

II. James Gallagher, son of Thomas (i) was born in Irclraid, October 



HISTORY OF JVESTMORELAXD COUXTY. ii 

14. 17S9, died March 3, iSSi. He married, February 6, 1821, Elizabeth Foster, 
the daughter of Thomas and Catherine Foster, iice Harrold. She was born 
December 14, 1802, and died I\farch 29, 1891. Their children were: i. i\lajor 
General Thomas Foster Gallagher, born January 17, 1822, died November 3, 
18S3; 2. Major George, deceased; 3. \\ illiam F., deceased; 4. Isabella, de- 
ceased; 5. Sarah Ann, deceased; 6. .Mary Jane, wife of Dr. Joseph L. Cook, 
of Westmoreland county ; 7. ]\lartha, deceased ; 8. Elizabeth F. ; 9. James S. ; 
10. Robert Taylor, deceased. 

III. Major-General Thomas F. Gallagher, oldest son of James Galla- 
gher (II) was a lifelong- merchant at New Alexandria, Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania. He had a remarkable career in military and business life. Prior 
to the' rebellion he was a prominent figure in the Pennsylvania militia move- 
ments, and advanced from the office of lieutenant to majcr-general, having 
been captain-brigadier and major-general, and after the rebellion became major- 
general of that body of state troops. His record as an officer during the great 
civil conflict from 1861 to 1865, was one of a marked success. He enlisted 
lulv 2, 1861, and was made the colonel of the Eleventh Pennsylvania "Re- 
serves" (fortieth in line). During his service he attained to the rank of brig- 
adier-general. He was commissioned as a leader against the famous "IMorgan 
Raiders," participating in their capture. (An extended account of his army 
record will appear in the Civil war chapters, volume I of this work). The chil- 
dren of General Gallagher and wife were : Elizabeth, deceased ; Anna Maria, 
deceased; Sarah Agnes, deceased; Margaret McBride, wife of JefTery W. 
Taylor. Esq., of Greensburg ; Isabella, wife of Dr. James R. Jack, of New 
Alexandria; and James H. (Gallagher. 

I\'. James H. Gallagher was educated in the public schools of his 
native town and graduated from Duffs Business College of Pittsburgh; in 
1887. Afterwards he was engaged in the real estate business in Greensburg, and 
was deputy clerk of the Orphans' court and deputy register and recorder of 
Westmoreland county. Mr. Gallagher was elected in the autumn of 1902, and 
in January. 1903. sworn into office, as recorder of deeds. His nomination was 
accorded him without opposition, and he was elected by three thciisand, three 
hundred and forty majority. He was renominated in April, 1905, by the Re- 
jniblican party, with no opposition, for another term of three years, and was 
elected by a majority of abcait six thousand. He was chosen chairman of the 
Republican county committee by acclamation in 1904, and did splendid work 
during the Roos'evplt-Fairbanks presidential campaign, aiding materially in 
bringing about a majority of nine thousand two hundred and forty-eight for 
the ticket in his county, dcaible that of any former election. He is a member 
of the Presbyterian church, a Knight Templar, and also belongs to various 
social orders. 

GEORGE Dr)RN, deceased, who was a leading business man of 
Greensburg, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, was born January i, 1818, 
in a pleasant little valley in Northern Germany, near the river Rhine, in the 
ancestral home of the Dorns. under the great confederation of states that 
formed an interregnum of the German empire from 1815 to 183;. 

He was carefully trained to habits of industry, honesty and economy, and 
received his education in the rural schools of the fatherland. At the age of 
eighteen he conceived the idea of emigrating to this country, in quest of more 
profitable employment than he could then secure in Germany. In 1836 he 
located .in Pennsylvania. ?.nd after a considerable struggle for work obtained 



12 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



employment on the Pennsylvania turnpike. Although young in years his ex- 
cellent deportment and display of good judgment in the care of teams secured 
for him the responsible position of stable manager at Turtle creek, where he 
had charge of all the horses used on one section of the pike. Atter a few- 
years service at the latter place he removed to Greensburg, where he assumed 
control of the pike stables, continuing until the building of the Pennsylvania 
Central Railroad, which monopolized the trade and travel of the state, and the 
old pike, unable to enter into competition, was soon abandoned as a public 
highway, becoming a local thoroughfare. In consequence of this great change 
in mode of travel, Mr. Dorn engaged in a new line of business, opening a large 
livery stable at Greensburg. As a liveryman he met with remarkable success, 
and with his usual energy soon controlled the leading livery stable in western 
Pennsylvania, not including Pittsburgh, and was for over thirty years one 
C'i the most widely known and popular liverymen in his section of the state. 
In addition to this line of work he was interested in various other industrial 
enterprises in the county. George Dorn was a self-made man, worth over 
■$100,000 at the time of his decease, all of which he acquired by honest industry 
and frugalilty. His business obligations were always promptly met and his 
contracts honorably fulfilled. He was popular and well liked both as a citizen 
and business man on account of his generous nature and sterling integrity. 
His life was one of activity and event ; he enjoyed none of the educational ad- 
vantages of the present era, nevertheless he was a man of varied information, 
endowed with a strong mind, the hewer of his own fortune and honest archi- 
tect of his own fame. In 1881 he sold the lot where the present jail building 
stands. Politically he was a strong Democrat, and ever evinced a lively inter- 
est in all pertaining to the welfare of the community. He was a member of the 
Evangelical Lutheran church, and was noted for his charity to the poor. He 
was an excellent linguist, speaking with fluency and ease the German, French 
and English languages. 

George Dorn married Elizabeth Alayberry, of Ligonier, and they had 
children : Julia, married John Long, a son of Samuel Long, who was a highly 
respected citizen of Hempfield township ; George, bookkeeper for Lewis 
Tranger for many years, died 1872 ; John, cne of the owners of the Greens- 
burg brewery ; Jacob, died in young manhood ; Harry Markle, died August 17, 
1895 : and Louis Tranger, who has been a partner in the Greensburg Brew- 
ing Company for the past seventeen years, doing a very successful business. 
The death of George Dorn occurred July 2. 1885, and was sincerely mourned 
by a large circle of friends. Airs. Dorn passed away March i, 1891. 

ROBERT ANDERSON FULTON LYON. The Lyon family, of 
Greensburg, Pennsylvania, was founded in this country by John Lyon, son of 
William Lyon, who with his family emigrated from Enniskillen county, prov- 
ince of Ulster, Ireland, to the province of Pennsylvania in the year 1763, set- 
tling in Cumberland county, now Milford township, Juniata county, about two 
miles west of Mifflintown. The warrant for the land of two hundred and sev- 
enty-three acres which was granted, is dated September 18, 1766. The prov- 
ince granted in 1773. John Lyon and others twenty acres of land for use of the 
Presbyterian church of Tuscarora, where the remains of Mr. Lyon were in- 
terred. He died in 1780. He married, in Ireland, Alargaret Armstrong, sister 
of Colonel John Armstrong, a prominent and patriotic Pennsylvanian, of pro- 
vincial and revolutionary times. She was a woman of bright intellect and fine 
conversational powers. She died about 1793, and her remains were also in- 




(Mx^(yi^tJttxf a^ nCtacnAmMj 



HISTORY OF JVESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 13 

terred at Tuscarora. Their children, all of whom were born in Ireland, were: 
AN'illiam, James, John, Mary, Frances, Margaret and Agnes. 

John Lyon, third son of John and :\largaret (Arnistrcng) Lyon, came into- 
possession of one-half of the old homestead, the other half reverting to Sam- 
uel Lvon. He resided on the old farm until June i, 1797, when he conveyed 
the same to Stephen Douglass and removed to Butler county, Pennsylvania,, 
where he died about 1820. The will of John Lyon was dated December 3, 1779. 
He married Alarv Harris, daughter of Captain Thomas Harris, and their chil- 
dren were: Thomas Harris, John, James, Margaret, Hilary, Catherine, and 
Xancy. 

fohn Lycn, second son of John and Mary (Harris) Lyon, married Ann 
Harper, daughter of Daniel and" Catherine (Gordon) Harper. Their children 
were: Gordon ]\L, Harris, Alary, Daniel Harper, John, Joseph, George, Thomas 
Wilson, and Catherine. 

Gordon M. Lyon, eldest son of John and Ann (Harper) Lyon, married 
(first) yiary ^ilarshall, of whom one daughter, Elizabeth, was born: she mar- 
ried R. P. Douglass. ;\Ir. Lyon married (second) Mary Anna, daughter of 
Jacob and Alary (Byerley) Kifer. Their children were: Thomas Franklin, 
Mary Emma, Margaret Cecelia, Robert Andersen Fulton, and Elmer Ells- 
worth, who married Clara E. Whitaker. 

LLOYD S. FLNDLEY, engaged in the restaurant business in Greens- 
burg, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, was born July 9, 1864, at West 
Overton, the son of George and Alatilda (Nef¥) Findley. George Findley is 
by trade a blacksmith, and conducted a shop with good success in Mount 
Pleasant for a number of years. He subsequently removed to Kansas, where 
he has resided for a number of years. His wife was Matilda NefT, who died in- 
November, 1901. Their children were: Cassins Markle, died in the west; 
Robert Taylor, Lloyd S., Ada M., died November 26, 1898: and Charles S. 

Llovd S. Findlev was formerly a conductor in the employ of the Pcnn- 
svlvania railroad for several years. He has been doing a very successful res- 
taurant business in Greensburg for the past ten years. Mr. Findley married, 
October 16. 1883, Susan Barbara Kuhns, daughter of Reuben and Sarah- 
Kuhns, of Greensburg. Their named children were : Ada Matilda, born Sep- 
tember 30, 1884: Wilbur Lloyd. October 2, 1885: Sarah, October 19, 1887, 
died October 3, 1889; Florence May, July 5, 1889: Josephine Marie, Alay 5,, 
1819: Susan Barbara, April 20, 1893: Agnes Naomi, October 14, 1905: Roy 
Reuben, September 16, 1897; Robert Taylor, August 13, 1899: Francis Kuhns,. 
April 26, 1901 ; Margaret Elizabeth, Alarch 22, 1903 ; and Gladys Althea, Feb- 
ruary 10, 1905. 

JUDGE ALEXANDER DANIEL McCONNELL was born in 
Loyalhanna township, Westmoreland county on Alarch 10, 1850. He is one of 
the two judges of the several jury courts of Westmoreland county, and since 
September i, 1873, has resided at Greensburg. 

( I ) The founder of the family in the Cnited States was Daniel McCon- 
nell, a native of Dumfrieshire, Scotland, born 1710. When yet a young man 
he came to Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, where he married Peggy Kirk- 
patrick, a young woman of Scotch-Irish ])arentagc. To them were born four 
sons and several daughters. Tlie sons were Sanuiel, David, Hugh and Daniel. 
The first three of these sons were married to sisters, daughters of Thomas 
Whiteside, an English gentleman, who came to Lancaster county, Pennsyl- 



14 HISTORT OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

vania, in the eighteenth century, and who there married Margaret Porter. To 
them were liorn five daughters and three sons. The three daughters who were 
intermarried with the three McConnell brothers, as above stated, were named 
Rebecca, Martha and Violet. Samuel, the oldest of the three McConnell 
brothers, married Viclet, the yongest of the three Whiteside sisters, while 
Hugh, the youngest of the brothers married Rebecca, the oldest of the sisters. 
David ]\lcConncll married Martha Whiteside, who in order of birth was the 
third of the five daughters of Thomas and Margaret (Porter) Whiteside. 

In respect to church connection the McConnells were seceders of the old 
type, while the Whitesides were Presbyterians. In those days this difference 
was regarded as a very substantial matter, and the parents of the respective 
■contracting parties, in each case, objected to the marriage on that account, but 
in each case the marriage took place in spite of such objection. 

(II) David McConnell, second sen of Daniel and Peggy (Kirkpatrick) 
McConnell (I) was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, 1764. lie mar- 
ried Martha Whiteside, in 1785, and lived in Lancaster county until 1800, when 
he came to Westmoreland county. They had a family of twelve children, all 
of whom lived to maturity and reared families, exceut one, who died in in- 
fancy. They nearly all located in western Pennsylvania, where their descen- 
dants are still to be fcanid, but many of them are also dispersed throughout al- 
most all of the northern and western states. They have engaged in a great 
variety of pursuits. .Among them are business men, farmers, and mechanics. 
The various professional pursuits have attracted many of them, and among 
them are to be found scores of teachers from all the original laranches of the 
family. At this writing (May, 1905) there are now living of David McCon- 
nell's lineal descendants four ministers, of whom Rev. Samuel D. McConnell, 
D. D., LL. D., and Rev. David McConnell Steel, both of New York city, are 
two; four lawyers, of whom two are judges, and five physicians. Of the fam- 
ilies of the four sons of David McConnell, three of them were, for many years, 
represented in the Eldership of Congruity Presbyterian church. 

(III) The eldest son, Daniel, grandfather of Judge Alexander D. Mc- 
Connell. was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, April 19, 1794, and when 
but six years of age he came with his parents to Westmoreland coiunty, where 
he continued to reside until the time of his death. He married, January 16, 
1817, Hannah McBride. She was the daughter of James McBride, son of 
James JMcBride, Sr., who had settled on the Loyalhanna creek in what is now 
known as Loyalhanna township, long prior to the Revolutionary war. Both of 
these James RIcBridcs performed military duty in the Revolutionary war. At 
the date of taking up the land on Loyalhanna creek, the nearest neighbor of 
the McBrides was ten miles distant from them. Several times they were driven 
from their lands by the Indians, but they always returned, and the farm has 
ever since been held in the McBride family, and is now owned by another 
James McBride, a lineal descendant of the original James McBride. Daniel 
McConnell was a farmer and resided on his farm in Salem township until his 
death, March 8, 1865. His widow, Hannah (McBride) McConnell, died at the 
same place. April 14. 1884. There they reared a family of ten children — three 
sons and seven daughters. Of these David Kirkpatrick McConnell (IV) was 
the eldest son. He was born November 18, 1819. He also was a farmer. 
David Kirkpatrick ^IcConnell was, on October 31, 1844, intermarried with 
Harriet Sloan, third daughter of John Steel Sloan and Jane (Christy) Sloan, 
of Salem township. \Vestmoreland county. The Sloan and Christy families were 
both Scotch-Irish pioneers in Westmoreland county and of the Presbyterian 



HISTORY OF JFESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 



15 



faith. The Christy family located in the neighborhood cf Xew Salem prior 
to the revolutionary war, and the Sloans near the same place a few years later. 
It therefore appears that the ancestors of the subject of this sketch, as thev are 
represented in the families of his four grandparents, have all been identified 
with the history of Westmoreland ccimty for more than a century. David 
Kirkpatrick JMcConnell and Harriet (Sloan) JMcConnell had nine children, 
five sons and four daughters, all now living except John S., who met death by 
an accident. David Kirkpatrick McConnell( father of Judge AlcConnell) died 
on December 5, 1900, leaving to survive him his widow whc still lives on the 
old homestead in Salem township. Their children are : 

1. James Graham McConnell, of Colorado. 

2. John Sloan ]\IcConnell who died in Colorado several years ago, but 
whose family, consisting of a widow, Hannah (Richards) !\IcConnell, a daugh- 
ter, wife of Rev. Charles Beatty of Pittsburgh, and a son Robert K. McConnell, 
who is a member of the Allegheny county bar — now reside in Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania. 

3. Alexamler Daniel McConnell (\') of Greensburg, Pennsylvania. 

4. Sarah ]\lcConnell Reynolds of Arkansas, wife of Hon. J. E. Reynolds. 

5. r^Ielissa INIcConnell Fester, wife of James W. Foster, of Salem town- 
ship, Westmoreland county. 

6. Mary AlcConnell P.uchanan. widow of D. 'S]. Puchanan, of Salem 
township, Westmoreland county. 

7. Kathcrine ^IcConnell Sterling, wife of James 'M. Sterling, of Latrobe, 
Pennsylvania. 

8. David Ellsworth McCcimell, of Salem township, and 

9. Robert Henry AlcConnell, of Mctor. Colorado. 

(\") Judge AlcConnell was educated in the public schools of Loyalhanna 
and Salem townships. New Salem Academy, and \\'ashington and Jefferson 
College. For several years he was the assistant of H. J\L Jones, superintendent 
of public schools of \\^estmoreland county. He located in Greensburg, in Sep- 
tember, 1873, as a teacher in the public schools, and soon thereafter was elected 
principal of these schools, and continued to serve in that capacity until June r, 
1876. On motion of Senator Edgar Cowan, August, 1877, admitted to prac- 
tice in the several courts of Westmoreland county, and has continuously since 
that time devoted himself exclusively to the law. He was prepared for ad- 
mission to the bar in the office of the late Judge James A. Hunter. In politics 
he has always been a Republican. He was chairman of the Republican county 
committee in 1878. In the following year he was nominated as a candidate for 
the legislature, but at that time the county was overwhelmingly Democratic, and 
a reduction of the amount of the Democratic majority was the full measure of 
his success. He received the nomination of his party in Westmoreland county 
for congress in 1882, but the rule of rotation that year threw the nomination in 
the district to Fayette county. He was nominated for judge of the court of 
common pleas in i88g. The Republican party, however, met defeat that year as 
it did for several years thereafter. A law was enacted in 1895, allotting two 
judges to the tenth judicial district, and Governor Hastings, on practically the- 
imanimous endorsement of the W'estmoreland county bar. appointed him, on 
June 17, 1895, to the new position thereby created. He received the Republican 
nomination, and in November of the same year was elected for a full term of ten 
years bv a majority of about three thousand. He was, on April 15, 1905, without 
opposition, nominated to succeed himself by the Rei)ublican party, and on July 
3, following, he was endorsed by the Democratic countv committee and his 



i6 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTY. 

name directed to be also placed on tl:e Democratic ticl-Lct as the candidate of that 
party. During his term of office many miportant questions have been presented 
for solution, notably among these was a recent c|uestion pertaining to the law 
governing the approval of the contract for the erection of the new court house, 
now in course of construction. The correctness of the decision rendered bv him 
in that matter, was stubbornly contested but it was unanimously approved by 
both the superior and the supreme courts of the state. Westminster College 
conferred on Judge McConnell, June i8, 1902, the degree of LL. D., an honor 
which has, in the last century, only been conferred on four other members of 
the Westmoreland county bar, viz. : Justice Coulter, Hon. Edgar Cowan, Hon. 
H. P. Laird and Hon. James A. Logan. Judge McConnell is a regular at- 
tendant of the First Presbyterian church of Greensburg. He is one of the 
trustees of the Morrison Underwood fund which by its donor was devoted to 
certain educational purposes. He is also a director of the Westmoreland Hos- 
pital, located at Greensburg. He is a member of the Masonic society, and of 
the Scotch-Irish society of Philadelphia. He was intermarried, March 24, 
1876, with Ella J. Turney, eldest daughter of Adam J. and Emma (Eyster) 
Turney. of Greensburg, Pennsylvania. 

Adam J. Turney was a grandson of Rev. John William Weber, a pioneer 
Reformed minister, who established numerous churches in western Pennsyl- 
vania, among which is the church on the corner of Smithfield street and Sixth 
avenue, in the city of Pittsburgh. 

Emma (Eyster) Turney is the daughter of Rev. Michael Eyster, a Lu- 
theran minister, who died, while yet a young man, in Greensburg. Judge Mc- 
Connell and wife are the parents of five children, four sons and one daughter. 
Kirk, the eldest son, is a graduate of Washington and Jefferson College, and is 
now a student at law. Turney, the second son, is a clerk in the bank of the 
Barclay Trust Company of Greensburg, while Alexander, Emma and Robert 
are yet in school. They were all born in Greensburg. Judge McConnell be- 
lieves that his position recjuires him to administer the law as it is, rather than 
as he might desire it to be, and that it forbids the use of it as a personal instru- 
ment wherewith to reward friends or punish enemies, that in the facts of every 
case is to be found the law of that case, and that no amount of patient labor 
expended on the proper ascertainment of the facts, or of research, in the ac- 
curate ascertainment of the law, can be anv greater than what is due to everv 
case great or sluall. He believes too that the epigram of President Roosevelt 
should be unflinchingly applied in a court of justice, viz.: that "everv man 
shall have a square deal, no less, no more." That faith he has carried into act 
on the bench, and both political parties by renominating him have given ap- 
proval of his course. 

SAML'EL O. W. LOWRY, a real estate dealer and general financial 
operator of the firm of Lowry & Boarts, of Greensburg, Pennsylvania, was born 
near the borough of Greensburg, July 4, 1843. Rf^bert Lowry, fatlier of Sam- 
uel C). W. Lowry, was born in the North of Ireland, and when he was but nine 
years of age came to Philadelphia with an uncle, having lost his father in early 
childhood. He learned the cloth weaver trade in Philadelphia. In 1839 he 
came to W^estmoreland county, Pennsylvania, having married Xacy Thornton 
in Philadelphia. She was a native of Ireland, coming to America in her teens. 
Robert Lowry walked the entire distance from Philadelphia to this county 
and settled near New Alexandria, where he farmed with Samuel Patterson, of 
Derry township. Later he moved to Greensburg vicinity, where he farmed and 



HISTORY OF J]-ESTMORnLAXD COUXTY. 17 

hauled ccal from a coal-pit. He died, in .May, 1898, aged eighty-three years. 
Their children were : :\lary Jane, born 1838. died May, 1905 : she married 
George Lindsay; Martha, born 1840, died 1868, married James H. Steel; ;\lar- 
garetP. born 1842, married Joseph W. Steel, and died about 1900; Samuel 
O. W., born July 4, 1843; James X., born 1S45, was killed July 10, 1864, at 
Spottsvlvania, \ irginia ; "he was a soldier in the Union cause during the Civil 
war: Matilda, born 1847, married William Hice, of Allegheny City, Pennsyl- 
vania; Robert C. born 1849, died October 21, 1904, at Greensburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, and was buried at Xew Alexandria, Pennsylvania ; Agnes, born about 
i8s I. married Rev. T. C. Sproul, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; EHzabeth, born 
1854, is single and resides at New Alexandria. 

Samuel O. W. Lowry was born July 4, 1843, obtained a good common 
school education in Westmoreland county, and then learned the trade of liar- 
nessmaker and satkller. wliich he followed for others and for himself for sev- 
eral years. He enlisted in the Union army, February 16, 1864, as a member of 
Company K, Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, under Colonel Rich- 
ard Coulter, of Greensburg, Pennsylvania. He was assigned to the Fifth 
Army Corps, General G. K. Warren commanding, the Third Division com- 
manded by General Crawford, and Second brigade, General Baxter, command- 
ing. He saw much active service, having participated in nearly all the battles 
of the Army of the Potomac from the "Wilderness" tight to Lee's surrender 
at Appomattox, including those great engagements known in Civil war history 
as Spottsylvania (where his brother was killed). North Ann, Cold Harbor,, 
Petersburg. Mrginia, and Hatch Run. He was at the grand review in Wash- 
ington, in 1865. and returned withcitt serious illness or any wounds. He rcr 
sumed his harness trade a short time and then became a salesman for sewing 
machines on the road, continuing until 1874. He then embarked in the har- 
ness and saddle trade at McKeesport, Pennsylvania, and followed that until 
1887, when he engaged in real estate business at that place, continuing until 
1897, when he removed to Greensburg, Pennsylvania, engaging in the same 
business and forming a partnership with L. N. Boats in 1901. He has numer- 
ous financial interests, making his a busy life. He is secretary and treasurer of 
the Greensburg Petroleum, Gas and Mining Ccmpanv of Burkesville. Ken- 
tucky; also connected with the Eli Sell (ieneral Merchandise Company. He is 
a stockholder and director in the ^\'ilkinslnIrg Trust Company, besides real 
estate interests at McKeesport, Pennsylvania. His residence is on a twenty-five 
acre farm, well improved, adjoining the borough of Green.sburg, where he en- 
joys the comfcTts of an independent life. Politically Mr. Lowry is a Repub- 
lican. While a resident in i\IcKeesport he served six years as member of the 
school board and the same period as member of the common council. He is an 
elder in the N\"cstminster Presbyterian Church of (ireensburg. He is a mem- 
ber of Colonel .Samuel Black Post, No. 59, G. A. R., at McKeesport, Pennsyl- 
vania, of which he was the commander in 1897. 

Mr. Lowry married, IMay 11, 1871, M. Emma, daughter of Robert and 
Margaret (Reed) Patterson, both now deceased. Mrs. Lowry was born July 
31, 1849. The children of this union are: Maggie Reed, born January. 1875, 
married GecTge W. Rogers. Robert J. N., born .\ugust, 1878, killed by being 
thrown from a mail car. of which he was a United States postal clerk, March 
18. 1905. He had served seven years in the L'nited .States navy department 
and was in the .Spanish-.Amcrican war. He had only been married two weeks 
when he lost his life. Thomas C, born June. 1880, still at home and associated 
with the Grceitsbtiri; Rcriezv: he was in the navy three years. Nancy T., born 



i8 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



1882, married George L. Pollins. Samuel W., born November 29, 1884, married 
Mae Randolph, September, 1904, and they have Emma Grace, born November 
15, 1905. Mary Emma, twin sister of Samnel, born November 29, 1884. Un- 
like many other prosperous business men Mr. Lowry believes in enjoying the 
profits of his business in home life and travel. With his wife and children he 
has made several extended tours through the south and west as far as the 
Pacific coast. Although sixty-two years of age he is scarcely taken for one^of 
more than fifty-five. It may be added that he is a lover of his home and greatly 
attached to the children of his household, and it is his rule to present each one 
of his children with a gold watch upon the day they attain their majority. 

HON. JOHN LATTA, one of the best known members of the West- 
moreland county bar, and a man universally admired and respected by the com- 
munity at large. He was born March 5, 1836 in Unity township, Westmore- 
land county, Pennsylvania, son of Moses and Eliza (Graham) Latta, and is of 
Scotch-Irish descent. The progenitor of the Latta family in \Ycstmoreland 
county was John Latta, grandfather of Hon. John Latta, who, with his brother 
Moses, settled in Mount Pleasant township, where the Mammoth Coke Works 
are now located. He married a Miss Storey of New Jersey, and by her had 
four children, among them being Moses Latta. 

Moses Latta, father of John Latta, was born in 1790 in Mount Pleasant 
township, six miles north of the borough of Mount Pleasant, and in early life 
removed to Lenity township, where he followed the occupation of farming. 
During the war of 1812 he enlisted in the company commanded by Captain 
Reynolds, but before his company reached the seat of war, a treaty of peace 
had been signed, and the troops returned hccne. He married Eliza Graham, 
daughter of Robert Graham, a native of Greensburg, and by occupation a horse 
dealer. Their children were : Mary Jane, wife of George R. Hughes, who 
resides on the old Latta homestead, and John, of whom later. Moses Latta 
died in February, 1848. when he was fifty-eight years old. 

John Latta received his early educational training in the common schools 
of his native place, and subsequently attended Sewickley and Elder Ridge 
Academies, in which he spent about five years, thus forming an excellent 
foundaticTi for a professional career. Determining to become a legal prac- 
titioner Mr. Latta formulated all his plans with that end in view. He entered, 
in 1857, into the study of law in Yale College, graduating from that institu- 
tion in 1859, and in November of the same year was admitted to the bar of 
Westmoreland county. He has since been in almost continuous practice of his 
profession. He was elected state senator in 1863, discharging the duties of 
that responsible office with efficiency and credit. He was elected to the legis- 
lature in 1871 and 1872, serving for two terms. Two years later he was 
nominated and elected lieutenant governcT of Pennsylvania, serving in that 
office for four years ; he led the state ticket in the election, his majority being 
something over four thousand. When his term as lieutenant governor ex- 
pired, Mr. Latta returned to Greensburg, resuming the practice of his profes- 
sion. As a lawyer Hon. John Latta holds an eminent place in the ranks of 
his profession, and is a man of the people, ever advocating the interests of the 
poor and oppressed. Added to his other qualifications he is endowed with a 
natural gift of eloquence, and is one of the most prominent and convincing 
speakers of the county. Fraternally he holds membership in the Masonic Or- 
der belonging to the K. T.. and is a R. A. ]\I. : also A. O. U. W. He married, 
September 12, 1865. Emma A. Hope, a daughter of C. C. Hope, of Union- 



HISTORY OF WESTMORRLAXD COUXTY. 19 

town, and a sister of \\' H. Hcpc, a land speculator of the city of Alexico. Four 
children were born to them, three of whom are living: Cuthbert H., born Sep- 
tember 7, 1866: Mary Maude, born March 17, 1868, married W. B. Ryan, 
general traffic agent for a Mexican railroad, who resides in the city of JM'exico; 
and Isabel G., born February 17, 1875. Mrs. Latta died in 1876, and on De- 
cember 13, 1877 'Mr. Latta married Rose McClellan, a daughter of E. B. Mc- 
Clellan, of Ludwick borough, and their children were: Rose, born December 
21, 1879, married Joseph T. Brunot, now deceased; Marie Josephine, born July 
2^'. i88i, married R. T. Jamison; John, born May 15, 1883, died in 1885 ; Pol- 
lard, born January 15, 1885; and Sarah Marguerite, born October 18, 1886. 

THE XLXL FAMILY. Colonel :\lillard Fillmore Null, the present 
capable prothonotary of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, was born April 
5, 1854, at the old ^NIcKeans Stand (now Ruffsdale) in East Huntingdon town- 
ship, \\'estnioreland countv. He is the son of Hcnrv Harrison and Ellen 
(Dom) Null. 

Captain Phillip Null, great-grandfather of Colonel M. F. Null, the Amer- 
ican ancestor, was born at \\'rightsvill9, York county, Pennsylvania, al)out 
1755. His parents were Huguenots, from the French-German district, known 
as Alsace-Loraine and were French people. Phillip settled in Reading, Penn- 
sylvania bout 1 73 1. In 1780 he w-ent as a captain of the revolutionary war 
in the militia to North Carolina, and was at the battle of Camden, August, 
1780. where General Gates was defeated by Cornwallis. He was also under 
the command of General Francis Marion, for whom he named his youngest 
son. He settled at Lincolnton, North Carolina, and married Margaret Beau- 
champ ( "Bushong") about 1781. She was of Rockingham county, Virginia. 
Their eldest son, Henry Null, the grandfather of Millard F. Null, was born 
April 24, 1783, in North Carolina, the eldest of six children. The family re- 
sided several years at the home of their grandfather, Pierre Beauchamp, in \'ir- 
ginia. They crossed the Alleghany mountains in 1799, locating in Westmore- 
land county, Pennsylvania, on land upon which now stands St. Joseph's Acad- 
emy at Greensburg. After a few years the family, except three children, re- 
moved to Putnam county, \'irginia, locating on several hundred acres of land 
taken on an officer's script. His son Henry and two married daughters re- 
mained in Westmoreland county. Captain Phillip Null died at Point Pleasant, 
\'irginia in 1834 of cholera, while en route to visit his son Henry at Greens- 
burg, Pennsylvania. 

Henry Null, grandfather of Colonel jNIillard F. Null, and one of the 
three who remained in Westmoreland county, located at "McKeans Old Stand" 
in East Huntingdon township. He married Elizabeth Pool, of Reading, Penn- 
sylvania, May 20, 1804. They had seven sons and two daughters, all reared 
at McKeans Old Stand (Ruffsdale), each child having a farm given him by his 
father. Hcnr>- 2sull began life's activities as a farmer. He became promoter 
of many large business enterprises and was a large contractor, constructing por- 
tions of the old Pennsylvania canal in Indiana county. He. with his sons, 
built several miles of the National Pike road, and also helped construct the 
Washington and Bedford Pike of which he became a charter member and for 
many years a director of the middle division. He procured the charter for the 
Cross Pike, ronnectinc: the Philadeli)hia and Pittsburgh Pike with the Wash- 
ington and Bedford Pike of which he built some portions. He w'as also the 
man who procured the charter for the Slack-Water navigation along the 
Youghioghcny river. He finally located at Rufifsdale, then called "McKeans 



HISTORY OF U'ESTMORELAXD COUNTY. 



Old Stand" and established a postoffice there. He owned some one thousand 
five hundred acres of land, as the fruits of his unceasing energy and toil, 
coupled with his business sagacity. He never sought publicity, but was made 
the candidate for the Pennsylvania Assembly in 1882, and sent as a delegate 
to the Harrisburg Convention which nominated General \\'illiam Henry Har- 
rison for president in 1836. His manliood was such that even those who dif- 
fered greatly from him were ever ready to admit his fairmindedness and gener- 
osity. In religion he was a pronounced Presbyterian, as was his good wife, both 
of whom were lifelong Christian examples of true devotion. He died October 
9, 1845, after a brief illness. He left a wife, six sons and two daughters, all 
of whom emulated the good name and character of their father. 

Henry Harrison Null, father of Colonel Millard V. Null, the fourth son 
of Henry Null was born February 16, 1815, at "McKeans Old Stand" (Ruffs- 
dale) in East Huntingdon township, Westmoreland county. Pennsylvania. At 
the death of his father lie became the owner of the old Null homestead. He 
married, July i, 1845, EHen Dom, daughter of Phillip and Margaret (Gerhardt) 
Dom, of Wellersburg, Pennsylvania. She was the great-granddaughter of Sir 
John Jacob Hentz and wife, Eleanor Krauch, of Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany ; 
she was a lady of great prepossession, cultured and beloved by all within the 
range of her wide acquaintance, and her kindly ways and charming graces were 
fully retained throughout her entire life which closed December 27, 1904. 
Their children were: ^larietta, married (first) Andrew Yont, now deceased, 
and (second), John J. Houseman; Minerva, widow of Joseph W. Hough, who 
at the time of his death was treasurer of Fayette cctinty. Pa. ; Josephine, (!Mrs. 
John Dempsey Boyd, of Uniontown) ; Millard Fillmore, of whom later; Jessie 
Beuton, (Mrs. Samuel Alwine, Jr.); Sumner F'remont ; Edwina married 
(first) Dr. Smith Fuller, Jr., now deceased; (second), James Clark Work, of 
Uniontown, Pa. ; Eleanor Nevada ; Henry Harrison, Jr., married Elsie G. Roth, 
of Allentown, Pa. 

At the date of Henry Harrison Null's death in May, 1905, he had twenty- 
five grandchildren, twenty-three of whom were living, including the following: 
By his daughter, Mrs. Housman, Harry Null Yont ; by Mrs. Hough, Henry 
Harrison Null Gerhardt Hough ; by Mrs. Boyd, Henry Harrison Null Boyd, 
now superintendent of the H. C. Frick Coke Comjiany plants in Fayette county, 
Pennsylvania ; Burgess Beauchamp Boyd, with the same company at Alverton 
and Tarr ; Logan Dempsey Boyd ; Josephine Null Boyd. When a youth, Henry 
Harrison Null made his first trip as a wagoner over the Alleghany mountains 
in 1834. He followed this from time to time as late as 1861. From 1845 to 
1872 he was an extensive farmer. During the last named year he removed to 
Greensburg. having been postmaster at Rufifsdale for twelve years. He also 
served as internal revenue collector. He Was a leading factor in the building 
of the Wellersburg and West Newton Turn Pike road, and was for a quarter 
of a century president of the Robbstown and Mount Pleasant Pike Road Com- 
pany. He opened the well known Null Hotel at Greensburg, and operated it 
until he died. May 16, 1905, after many months of patient suffering. He had 
lived over ninety years and noted with great interest the wonderful events of 
the past century. Politically it may be said that this venerable man early be- 
came a leader and not from selfish motives but from true principle. He cast his 
first vote for General Harrison in 1836, and had voted for every Whig and 
Republican presidential candidate including Theodore Roosevelt in the Au- 
tumn of 1904. The subjoined is an extract taken from a local paper the day 
after his death: "In 1872 the familv moved to Greensburg. Here he was 



i 




7^,7/.^'/im 



^T ^J^^^<^. 



HISTORY OF U'ESTMORELAXD COUXTV. 21 



known as possessing a liberal and patriotic spirit. In his business relations he 
was scrupulously honest. He had a large acquaintance throughout the entire 
county, and by all with whom he came in contact he was held in highest es- 
teem. He was a voracious reader and one of the best informed men on public 
events in Greensburg. His views were liberal and he was outspoken in his 
sentiments. He was opposed to capital punishment and an advocate of women's 
rights and suffrage, of liberty of conscience, and of all principles of freedom, 
secular and religious. Strongly characterized with a humanity loving spirit, 
he was greatly interested in reforms for society at large. He was a whole- 
souled man, ever ready to assist those who appealed to him. Until within a 
few months of his death ]\Ir. Null possessed a remarkable memory of events 
of the early part of the century. He was a recognized authority en public hap- 
penings. Since 1856 he had kept a diary, recording each day's happenings 
with an accuracy which commanded on many occasions reference bv historians. 
These diaries contain a great wealth of interesting data." 

^lillard Fillmore Null obtained his education in the public schools of 
Westmoreland county, and by a course in Milton Academy. He went from 
the school room to serve as an assistant for the engineering corps that laid 
out the Southwestern Pennsylvania railway. He also taught school in his na- 
tive county for seven terms. He again took up surveying and mine engineer- 
ing for a number of years, part of the period in Fayette county, Pennsylvania. 
Later he became associated with the H. C. Frick Coke Company at its' central 
works as timekeeper, paymaster and superintendent, serving in all fourteen 
years. Politically, he inherited Republicanism from his father. In 1883 his 
party induced him to become a candidate for surveyor, but notwithstanding he 
ran over five hundred ahead of his ticket, his party was not victorious. From 
that date he has taken a more active part in politics, and in 1900 was elected as 
prothonotary of Westmoreland county and re-elected in 1903. At the time 
when the Central High school of East Huntingdon township was established, 
he was a director and had much to do towards its establishment and the 
sequel has proved his wisdom. He has been connected with the Presbyterian 
church since 1885, first at his old home and since 1901 as a member of the 
First Presbyterian church of Greensburg. He is an honored member of the 
Masonic fraternity, belonging to K. C. of K. T. Lodge, No. 18 at Greensburg. 
Of Mr. Null's domestic relations it may be stated that he married. ]\Iarch 29, 
1877, at Bells Mills, South Huntingdon township. Charlotte Bell, daus'hter of 
the late ex-Sheriff William Bell and wife, Frances (Bennett) Bell. Mr. Bell 
was born January 16, 1816 at Bells Mills, the son of Walter and Pollv (Fm- 
ley) Bell. Walter Bell was born at Shipi)ensburg. Pennsvlvania. in 1769 and 
removed to Westmoreland county in 1787, locating at Bells Alills, for whom 
they were named. He died August 12, 1868. 'He married Pollv Finley, 
daughter of Andrew and Jane Finley, of Port Royal and came from North 
Carolina, originally. The Finleys were of Scotch extraction. 

William Bell. ^Irs. Null's father, was of Scotch blood. He died on 
the old homestead, at Bells IMills, December 24. 1888. The family were of the 
Presbyterian faith. He served as sheriff of this county from 1862 to 1865. 
He was most generous and noted for his hospitalitv and was acquainted far 
and near. His wife was the daughter of David and Sarah Bennett, born i82r). 
near Port Royal. _ David Bennett was the son of lohn Bennett, who emigrated 
from France. His wife was Sarah Hough, of German ancestrv. Their chil- 
dren were: I. Charles McCully, educated at the High School aiid Seminary at 
Greensburg, graduating in the classical course in 1899. He studied for a law- 



22 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

yer and registered, but is now in the accounting department of the Keystone 
Coal and Coke Company. 2. Walter Bennett, attended the public schools of 
Creensburg and Leech's Business College of the same place, taking stenography 
and typewriting. \\'hen sixteen years of age he served as page two terms for 
Senator Robbins, in Washington, D. C. For the past si.x years he has been 
associated with the American Sheet Steel and Tin Plate Company, located at 
Sccttdale, Pa. 3. Eleanor attended the common schools of Westmoreland 
county and Darlington Seminary at West Chester, Pa. 4. Genevieve. 5. Millard 
Fillmore. 6. Galia Minota. 7. Henry Harrison. 

Colonel M. F. Null, as he is always called, is an unassuming man, who 
may justlv be proud of his ancestry, and his highest aim in life is to be able to 
properly educate his family, that they may bear well their part as good citizens 
and members of society, as have tho generaticns before them, bearing the 
name of Null. 

CAPTAIN JAMES J. WIRSING, a valiant soldier in the great war 
of the rebellion, and one of the highly esteemed residents of Greensburg, was 
born in Donegal township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, November 9, 
1840, the son of Jchn and J\Iary (Shafer) Wirsing. The progenitor of the 
Wirsing family in America was his paternal grandfather. Rev. John Casper 
Wirsing, who was born December 27, 1766, in Titzingcn by "Waertzburg on 
the Main," Germany. He was a commissioned officer in the German army, and 
emigrated to America October 3, 1789. On board the ship on which he was 
sailing he became acquainted with Catlierinea Elizabetha Biltherr, who was 
born in German v April 12, 1768, and had scld her time for a period to pay 
her passage to America. Mr. Wirsing inirchased her time and they were mar- 
ried January I, 1793. Soon after landing in the United States Mr. Wirsing 
went to Baltimore where he remained some time, then removing to Westmore- 
land county, which he made his future home. He was a local preacher in the 
]\Iethodist church, and was a well educated man of good address. In 1825 he 
removed to Somerset county, near Petersburg, Pennsylvania. He had the fol- 
lowing children: Catherine: John, father of Captain J. J. Wirsing; Henry, 
married Mary King, and had a son, John Wirsing, who resides in Fayette 
county. Henry, died in 1888: Mary Ann Shadrach ; Thomas B. : Samuel H., 
married Catherine Zipley and Helena Frantz. The father of these children 
died in 1835. 

John Wirsing, second child and eldest son of Rev. John Casper Wirsing, 
was born January 7, 1798. By occupation he was a farmer, and was very suc- 
cessful in that line. In early life John Wirsing removed to Donegal town- 
ship where he held many local offices. He was a stanch Democrat, and a 
very active worker for that organization. December 18, 1821 he was united in 
marriage to Mary Shafer, who was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, 
May 12, 1801, a daughter of Peter Shafer, who served with Washington in 
the war of the revolution until the cessation of hostilities. In 1807 Mr. Shafer 
removed to Donegal township where he patented three hundred acres of land, 
and where he lived an industrious and exemplary life. The following named 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Wirsing: Peter, deceased; Catherine, 
married John Kooser of Iowa ; Eliza, married W. R. Hunter ; Harriet married 
H. M. Milhof: Margaret, deceased; Thomas, of Illinois; John S., of Mount 
Pleasant township ; Jeremiah, of Scottdale ; and Captain James J. Wirsing. 

James J. Wirsing was educated in the common and private schools of his 
native countv, and thus received an excellent foundation for a successful bus- 



J 



■ HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 23 

iness career. He was engaged in farming until he was about nineteen, and 
then learned the trade of plasterer which he followed for several years. When 
the great Civil war was in progress, and the call for volunteers was urgent, 
Mr. \Mrsing assisted very materially in raising a company of soldiers in the 
Ligonier valley. He was offered the captaincy of this company, but declined 
this, accepting the position of second-lieutenant. His company joined the 
Eightv-fourth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry at Arlington 
Heights in September. 1862, and became Company C of that regiment. He 
was present at the battle of Fredericksburg, and January 12, 1862 was pro- 
moted to the position of first lieutenant. He participated in the battle of Chau- 
cellorsville, and during that engagement was badly wounded, being shot twice 
through the leg and hip, and on this account received a furlough of sixty days. 
He repined his regiment on its march to Gettysburg. He was promoted to the 
captaincv August 29, 1863, and commanded his company in all of the battles 
until October 2, 1864, Tn August of that year he was shot in the breast, and 
on October 2 was shot through both shoulders and left leg at Petersburg, and 
so badly wounded that he was left for dead on the battlefield. He was ap- 
proached by a rebel soldier who was in the act of shooting him when a confed- 
erate officer interfered and saved his life. He was removed to Richmond where 
he was confined in Libby prison for a time, then paroled and sent to Annapolis, 
;Maryland. He returned home on a leave of absence after two months in 
Annapolis, and being unable to join bis regiment was honorably discharged as 
a prisoner of war on January 3, 1865. From the time of his discharge from 
service to 1878 he was engaged in plastering and as clerk in a dry goods and 
hardware store in ]\Iount Pleasant. In 1878 he was elected treasurer of West- 
moreland county, and discharged the duties of that office with honor and credit. 
Since 1882 he has been engaged in the real estate and fire insurance business, 
and he has been highly successful in that line. As a citizen Captain Wirsing 
has the respect of his townspeople, who admire his integrity and honesty, and 
his hospitable, genial disposition has gained for him many friends. In political 
belief Captain W'irsing accords with the Democratic party. He is a prominent 
member of the G. A. R.. U. V. L., Military order of the Loyal Legion of the 
United States, Philanthropy Lodge, No. 225, A. Y. M.. and numerous other 
organizations. He is a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Captain Wirsing was married, June 5, 1867, to Charlotte ;M. Fluke, daughter 
of William S, Fluke. ex-sheriff"of Bedford county, Pennsylvania. Their chil- 
dren are: Myrtle, J. Edgar, William F., Herbert, IMary E,, Ralph, Mabel, 
and Martha. 

HON. JOHN B. STEEL, of Grcensburg, Pennsylvania, first presi- 
dent judge of tile Separate Orphans' court of W'estmoreland county, is the 
eldest son of William and Sarah Jane (Brown) Steel, born February 17, i86r, 
on the Hannastown farm, the seat of the famous old town of Hannastown, 
which was burned bv the Indians in 1772, in Hempfield township, Westmore- 
land county, Pennsylvania. 

Judge Steel came from that sturdy Scotch-Irish race that has done so 
much for the cause of liberty and the development of the country, being Scotch- 
Irish in everv line of his ancestrv. His great-grandfather, James Steel, was 
born in Castle Blaney, near Carrick Macross, Ireland, about 1741, and who 
emigrated to America after the Steel Roy insurrection (1772") stopped on the 
eastern side of the mountains at that Scotch-Irish hive in Cumberland, now 
Franklin county, and moved westwarrl about 1773, settling on land in Sewick- 



24 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTY. 

ley manor, now ]\Iount Pk'asant twonship, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
about the time of the formation of Westmoreland county. Here he bought 
land from the Penns, and became an important land owner in his day of land 
that is now in the Connellsville coking coal region, four hundred acres of the 
land bought by him has been passed down through his descendants, and is now 
owned by his great-grandson, Joseph W. Steel. True to the characteristics of 
his race he became an agitator for freedom, was a member of Mount Pleas- 
ant Association formed to protect this western country, was three years in the 
Revolutionary army, took the oath of allegiance required by all foreign born citi- 
zens, before Hugh Martin, a justice of this county, March 3, 1777, and served 
with his brothers-in-law, Robert and Andrew Donaldson, in the campaign of 
the Jerseys. He was married (first) to Elizabeth McMasters, a sister of James 
McMasters, who lived near his farm. They bad two children : Joseph Steel, 
intermarried with Barbara lilystone, of Franklin township, this county; and 
Jane Steel, intermarried with William Hunter, near what was then Louden- 
ville, now Perrysville, Richland county, Ohio. About the close of the Revolu- 
tionary war, James Steel was married to Elizabeth Donaldson, and they had 
three children: Elizabeth, born September 24, 1785, intermarried with Alex- 
ander Hamilton, of what is now Ruffsdale, Pa. ; James Steel, born on the day 
of the adoption of the United .States constitution, September 17, 1787, inter- 
married with Martha ]\lcCutheon, of Franklin township, this county, and 
John Steel, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, born April 7, 1789, 
intermarried with his cousin, Martha Walker, the daughter of Andrew and 
Sallie (Donaldson) Walker, of Virginia, near Steubenville, Ohio. James Steel, 
the great-grandfather, died September 10, 1823, and was buried at the Middle 
Presbyterian church, ]\Iount Pleasant tf)wnship, Westmoreland county. Pa. 

John Steel, the granclfathcr, acquired the old homestead in Mount Pleas- 
ont township, and in 1826 i)urchased the Robert* Hanna farm on which was 
located Hannastown, the former county seat of Westmoreland county, which 
then embraced all western Pennsylvania. This property became the home- 
tead farm of John Steel, the father of Judge Steel. To John Steel and 
Martha Walker were born nine children : Sarah, intermaried with Heny 
Byers, of Grapeville, Pa. ; Eliza, intermarried with Andrew Machesney, of 
Greensburg, Pa. : James, intermarried with Elizabeth Hanna, Pleasant Unity, 
Pa. : Joseph Walker, intermarried with Malinda Brechbill, of Greensburg, Pa. ; 
John, intermarried with Susan Geiger, Beatty, Pa. ; Margaret, intermarried 
with James M. Steel, her cousin, Salem township, Westmoreland county. Pa. ; 
]\Iary J., intermarried with Henrv T. Hanna, of Smithton, Pa. ; Martha inter- 
married with Major David P. ^lechling, of Greensburg, Pa. ; and William 
Steel, intermarried with Sarah Jane Brown, of Hannastown, Pa. All of these 
are now deceased, except ]Mary J. Hanna and William Steel. John Steef, the 
grandfather, died Alay 22, i860, being one of the foremost business men and 
largest land owners of his county. He is buried at the Congruity Presbyterian 
church. 

William Steel, the father of Judge Steel, was born October i, 1833, and 
was married to Sarah J. Brown, April 3, i860. He is a large owner of valu- 
able real estate and coal land, has alwavs been identified with farming and stock- 
raising interests of the county, was Westmoreland's pioneer in the rearing of 
shorthorn cattle, and one of western Pennsylvania's foremost importers and 
breeders of pure bred draft horses. William and Sarah J. Steel, are both liv- 
ing at the Hannastown farm, in Salem and Hempfield townships, this county, 
and their children are: Hon. John B. Steel, of Greensburg, Pa.; Mary Herron, 



HISTORY OF IVESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 25 

intermarried with George Coleman, East End Pittsburg, Pa. ; Eliza :\Iartha, 
intermarried with Samuel C. Patterson, near New Alexandria, Pa.; Agnes 
Eeatty. intermarried with George S. Barnhart, near Greensburg, Pa.; Helen 
:\lilligan intermarried with Samuel C. Hugiis, near New Alexandria, Pa. ; IMar- 
garet Elder, intermarried with Samuel B. Moore, near Latrobe, Pa. ; Clara Ma- 
finila, unmarried, residing at home ; William Oliver Steel, deceased : Joseph 
Walker Steel : Sarah Jane Steel, unmarried and residing with their parents ; 
and Henrietta :\Iarie, intermarried with L. A. Nichols, of Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

On the maternal side the ancestry of Judge Steel is also Scotch-Irish ■. they 
came from Scotland with numerous other Covenanters, under King James' con- 
fiscation act, settling in county Donegal, Ireland. :Matthew Brown, the seventh 
grand-ancestor, was a captain in Colonel George Walker's famcrus Derrv Reg- 
iment which rendered such valiant service to the cause of civil and religious 
libertv at the siege of Londonderry, and at the battle of the Boyne. His sword 
is stiil preserved an a precious relic by Howard Brown and William Brown, 
his descendants in Pittsburgh. His grandson, also Matthew Brown, by name, 
left countv Donegal with his family in 1774, and came to America in company 
with the Reverends Dobbin and Lynn, who afterwards founded an academy 
at Gettvsburg and taught the first abolition dottrine on the very field where 
ninetv vears after freedom received her crowning laurel. He settled at Green 
Castle. Franklin county, and was there buried, leaving to survive him five chil- 
dren: David, the great-great-grandfather of Judge Steel; John, intermarried 
with Catharine Foster, sister of Robin Foster, of near New Alexandria, Pa. ; 
moved to Sugar Creek township, Armstrong county. Pa.; Andrew, of Arm- 
strong county". Pa. ; Samuel Brown said to have moved to Mrginia ; Mary, in- 
termarried with James Watt, Franklin county. 

David Brown, the great-great-grandfather of Judge Steel, was married to 
Margaret Oliver, whose niother was an Erskine, of the house of Erskine, Scot- 
land"; he purchased in 1802 the land now owned by John Oliver Brown, his de- 
scendant, at the mouth of the White Thorn Run, near New Alexandria, Penn- 
svlvania. To them were born six children : Alary, intermarried with Nathaniel 
Alexander, Allegheny township, Westmoreland county. Pa. ; Thomas Oliver 
Brown, grandfather of Judge Steel; Elizabeth, intermarried with Thomas 
( iailey, Clarksburg, Pa. ; David, intermarried with :\Taria Beatty, Salem town- 
ship : Margaret, intermarried with John Coleman. Elders Ridge, Pa. ; James, 
intermarried with ^Margaret Elizabeth Wilson, of Salem township. On the 
death of David Brown he was buried in the New Alexandria Covenanter church- 
vard, and his real estate became the property of Thomas Oliver Brown, grand- 
father of Judge Steel, and James Brown. 

Thomas Oliver Brown was married to Nancy Beattie Brown, a daughter 
of Robert Beattie and :Martha ('\\'elsh) Beattie, and a granddaughter of 'Will- 
iam Beattie, of Knock Bracken, near Belfast, Ireland, and came from a fam- 
ily several of whose members were banished for participation in the Irish 
rebellion of 1798. Their children were: Martha Welsh, intermarried with 
:Major D. P. Marshall, Arkansas: David Oliver Brown, intermarried with Mary 
Stewart. Saltsburg, Pa. ; Sarah Jane Brown, intermarried witli William Steel ; 
Margaret Erskine, intermarried with John Elder, Derry township, Westmore- 
land countv. Pa. : Nancy A., intermarried with Henry Scanor, of Wijifield, 
Kansas: Mary Elizabeth, intermarried with James Monroe, of Saltsburg, Pa.; 
Thomas Oliver Brown is buried in the Reformed Presbvtcrian churchyard at 
New Alexandria, Pa. All of his children except Sarah Jane Steel are now de- 
ceased. 



2G HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

Judge Steel is distinctively a self-made man, worked on the farm, and 
attended district school and academy during his early life, and later entered 
Geneva College as a classical student and graduated from that institution in 
1885. He read law with Judge James A. Hunter, was admitted to practice in 
the several courts of Westmoreland county, August, 1888, opened an office for 
the practice of his profession with Hon. Welty McCullough, and on the return 
of the latter from congress in the spring of 1889 the law firm of McCullough 
and Steel was formed, which continued until the death of Mr. McCullough, 
six months later. He afterwards continued the business oi the firm at their 
former offices, and at once sprang into full practice at a bar composed of some 
of the leading legal minds of western Pennsylvania. Later he took into part- 
nership with him H. Clay Beistel, who read law at Dickinson law school and 
in his office. He has always been a staunch Republican, and for many years 
has been one of the leaders of his party ; he was the chairman of the organiza- 
tion in 1894, was the candidate of the Republican party for president judge of 
the court of common pleas in 1899, and was defeated by one hundred and sev- 
enty-one votes, by the then present incumbent. Judge Doty, after a most des- 
perate contest in which almost thirty thousand votes were polled. He was put 
forward by his county and section of the state as a candidate for congressman 
at large against Hon. Galusha A. Grow, and was elected by the Republican 
state convention as a delegate at large to the Republican national convention 
that selected McKinley and Roosevelt. On the creation of the Separate Or- 
phans' court judgeship in Westmoreland county m 1901, Judge Steel was ap- 
pointed, on April 26, of that year, as president judge of the Separate Or- 
phans' court, to fill said position ; he was conceded the nomination by his party, 
and was elected by a large majority at the November following for the ten 
years' term beginning first Monday of January, 1902. He is one of the trus- 
tees of the First Presbyterian church of Greensburg, Pennsylvania. He has 
helped to organize and is director in a number of the leading banks of his 
county, is the owner of and interested in the development of coal in Wash- 
ington and Westmoreland counties ; is one C'f the directors of the John W. 
Pollins Company, the Greensburg Finance Company, the Pittsburgh and South- 
western Coal Company, and is a large owner of coal, farm and town properties. 

J. HOWARD PATTON, prominent in the business enterprises of 
Greensburg and Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, is a descendant of fam- 
ilies, many members of whom have been important factors in the settlement 
and upbuilding of this commonwealth. He was born July 29, 185 1. at Union 
Furnace, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and descends through the follow- 
ing lines of ancestry. 

(I) John Murray, a native of Scotland, came to America late in life with 
his two sons, William and John, and their families. 

fll) William ]\Turray, a native of Scotland, born February 24. 1690. emi- 
grated to America in 1732. accompanied bv his father and brother John. They 
settled on the Swartara in the Province C'f Pennsylvania. He married Isabella 
Lindley, of Scotland, who bore him five sons : Samuel, William, James, John, 
and Thomas. William Murray (father) died on his farm, July 24, 1773. 

(in) James IMurray, born in Scotland, in 1729, accompanied his parents 
to America in 1732. He was the owner of a farm adjoining the borough of 
Dauphin. Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, for which he entered an application 
in the land office in 1768. He was chosen to rejircsent Upper Paxtang town- 
ship in 1775. in the committee of safety for Lancaster county, and attended the 



I 



i 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 27 

meetings of the committee in Lancaster on November 8, 9, and 10. At tliat 
time he was a captain of a company of footmen, of the Fourth Battahon of As- 
sociators in the county of Lancaster. At a military convention representing the 
tiftv-three battalions of Associators of Pennsylvania on July 4, 1776, he was 
present as a captain. With John Rogers and JoTin Harris, on July 8, 1776, by 
appointment of the Provincial Conference, he superintended the electicai at 
Garbers Mill, for the sixth district of Lancaster county, to choose delegates to 
the convention that assembled on the fifteenth of the month, which framed the 
first constitution of the commonwealth. During the remainder of that and the 
following year he was almost in constant active military service with his com- 
pany. His company, a roll of which appears in Dr. Egles notes and queries, 
first series, page 7, and in Pennsylvania archives, second series, volume XHI, 
page 310, went into the continental service in July, or early in August, 1776. 
In a return of the troops quartered in and near Philadelphia, made August 27, 
of that year, it is reported sixty strong. It participated in the battles of Tren- 
ton and Princeton. He commanded one of the companies of the Tenth Bat- 
talion, Lancaster county militia, and was with the expedition up the West 
Branch in 1779. The exposure to which Captain Murray was subjected during 
the revolutionary struggle brought on an attack of rheumatism, from which for 
many years prior to his death he was a constant sufferer. He married Re- 
becca McLean, a native of Scotland, who died August 7, 1795. His death 
occurred in his farm adjoining the borough of Dauphin, Dauphin county, Fcb- 
ruarv 15, 1804. The remains of both rest side by side in the old Dauphin cem- 
etery. Their oldest daughter was: 

(IV) Margaret ^^lurray, born 1756, in Paxtang township, Lancaster 
county, ("now Dauphin county) Pennsylvania, died April 27, 1826, at Hunting- 
don, Pennsylvania. She was married May 7, 1776, by the Rev. John Elder, to 
John Simpson, (see page 800, Vol. 8, Penn. Archives) born 1744. in Bucking- 
ham township, Bucks county, Pennsylvania. His parents. John and Mary 
Simpson went south and were residents of North Carolina in 1783, and 
Georgia in 1791. The son learned the trade of blacksmithing, and in 1763 set- 
tled on the Susquehanna in what was then Upper Paxtang township, Lancaster 
(now Dauphin) county. He was commissioned second lieutenant by Captain 
James Murray's Company, on August 15, 1775, in the Fourth Battalion of As- 
sociators of Lancaster county. Lieutenant-Colonel Cornelius Cox, of the bat- 
talion, ordered him to remain in the continental smith shop at Bristol on Jan- 
uary' 28, 1777. He served during the greater port of the Revolution, towards 
its close in command of a company of militia, and then returned to his farm. 
In the spring of 1793 he removed to Huntingdon, where he passed the re- 
mainder of his days. Their eldest daughter was : 

(V) Rebecca Simpson, born April 8, 177/, in Paxtang township, Lancas- 
ter county, Pennsylvania, died October 13, 1845. '" Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. 
She married, April 16, 1801, John Patton, born December 25, 1757, in Franklin 
county, Pennsylvania, died I\Iay 23, 1836, on his farm in Woodcock valley, 
Walker township. Huntingdon county. Pennsylvania. In his earlier years he 
resided in the town of Huntingdon, and the following is taken from the records 
there : He was the second sheriff of the county, being ap])ointcd by the Free 
Men of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, David Redick. vice-president, 
October 29. 17S8: again, November 6, 1789, by Thomas Mifflin, president of 
council; December 3. 1790, by Thomas Mifflin, president of council; December 
3, 1791, by Thomas ^lifflin, governor; December 3, 1794, by Thomas Mifflin, 
governor ; November 5, 1800, by Thomas McKcan. governor ; October 27, 



28 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



1806, 'ijy William Findley, governor; November 3, 1812, by Simon Snvder, 
governor; October 26. 1818, by William Findley, governor, for a term of not 
less than three years, and possibly six years, covering a period of over thirty 
years as sheriff. He was an efficient public ofificer. 

(VI) George W. Patton, son of John and Rebecca (Simpson) Patton, 
was born September 6, 18 17, and died March 7, 1882, in Philadelphia. He was 
one of the lessees of Union Furnace and manager at Blair Furnace. He re- 
moved to Altoona in 1852, and in 1854 was chosen first chief burgess of the 
town, re-elected in 1855, and in i86t was appointed postmaster, serving eight 
years, and in 1870 was elected associate judge of P.lair county, subsequently re- 
moving to Philadelphia. He was twice married (first) June 10, 1845, to Alary 
Burket, who died March 28, 1856, and had issue: T. Blair Patton, general 
superintendent of the Pennsylvania industrial school, Huntingdon; William A. 
Patton, assistant to the president of the Pennsylvania railroad, Philadelphia ; 
and J. Howard Patton, of Greensburg, Pa. Mr. Patton married (second) 
December 19, 1861, Emma J. Hawksworth, of Altoona, and had issue: IMary 
V. Patton. wife of Harold A. Freeman, St. David, Pa.; and Margaret Murray 
Patton, who died Decembei- 15. 1889. 

((VH) J. Howard Patton, born July 29, 1851, moved to Altoona with his 
parents in 1852. After receiving his education in the public schools, he entered 
the service of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company in 1870, spending ten years 
in the general superintendent's office. He moved to Claridge, Westmoreland 
county, in 1885, where he engaged in the mercantile business, and was inter- 
ested in and opened up the Claridge Gas Coal Company's works of which he 
still has charge. He moved to Greensburg in 1889. where he organized and is 
president of the following companies : Atlantic Crushed Coke, Lucesco Coal, 
Huron Coal, Howard Gas Coal, Hempfield Foundry, Greensburg Storage and 
Transfer, and other coal interests I'n Westmoreland county. Politically Mr. 
Patton affiliates with the Republicans. He is a Lutheran in his religious faith. 
He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, being advanced to tlie deijree of a 
K. T. ... 

Mr. Patton has been twice married (first) April 13, 1880, to A. Louisa 
Cunningham, of Holdensburg, Pennsylvania, who bore him one child, Howard 
C. Patton, born February 15, 1881, who atended the Ohio Military Institute, at 
Cincinnati, and is now the superintendent of the Huron Coal Company and 
Howard Gas Coal Company, in which his father is actively interested. Mrs. 
Patton died November 24. 1882. For his second wife ]\'tr. Patton married 
Jessie R. Geiger, youngest daughter of the late Judge Levi Gei^er and his wife, 
Rosalinda Geiger, of LVbana, Ohio. While Mr. Patton is a busy man of af- 
fairs, he is not so absorbed in business as to forget the better things of life — 
the enjoyment of friendship and.his family and fireside ties — and is ever readv 
to take part in any matter of general interest to the public and for the better- 
ment of mankind. 

MICHAEL JOSEPH RORKE, proprietor of the Hotel Cope, at 
Greensburg. Pennsylvania, was born in Dublin, Ireland, September 2, 1866, 
the son of Thomas and Jane (King) Rorke, both of whom are deceased, died 
when their son Michael J. was quite young, and thus he was left to fight the 
conflicts of life alone. When seventeen years of age. in company with acousin, 
John Finnegan. Michsel J. Rorke came to America, landing in New York Citv! 
February 4, 1883. The same year he found employment at the Blue Rock 
quarry, near Connellsville, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, making "Belgium 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. . 29 

Blocks." Here he labored for one year and then engaged in the hotel business, 
clerkino- at the Yough House, at Connellsville, Pennsylvania, where he remained 
five years. He then took charge of a hotel at Scottdale for two years, then pur- 
chased a hotel in Homestead, Pennsylvania, which he operated for ten years, 
after which he sold the same and leased the Hotel Cope at Greensburg, w^hich 
he is now managing in a highly successful manner. Two years after his arrival 
in the United States his brother Nicholas followed him, and has been associated 
with him in business the greater part of the time since. Nicholas Rorke is mar- 
ried and the father of three children. Michael J. Rorke obtained a common 
school education, and this was supplementetl by attendance at Duff's Business 
College of Pittsburg. He is a member of the Roman Catholic church, and a 
Democrat in politics. At Homestead, Pennsylvania, in i8y6, he was elected 
bv a majority to the position of inspector of elections, and was a member of 
the Fire Company. He is a member of the O. of E. Lodge, Xo. 511, at Greens- 
burg: the fire company at Greensburg; the C. AI. B. A. and the "L. and H." at 
Homestead. Mr. Rorke was married January /, 1890, to .Sarah U'Xeill, 
daughter of Bernard and INlariah O'Xeill, of Scottdale, Pennsylvania, where 
she was reared. 

ALBERT H. BELL, a prominent member of the bar of Westmoreland 
county, was born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Xovember 20, 1857, and is a represen- 
tative of an old Westmoreland county family. While born in the then far west, 
he was reared in the Ligonier valley, removing to Greensburg in 1880, where 
he is now engaged in the practice of his profession. 

David Bell ( grandfather ) was a native of Westmoreland county, and was 
a brother of Judge James Bell, one of the early associate judges of the county. 
David Bell was a school teacher during the greater part of his life ; in politics 
he was a Democrat, and he took a lively interest in supporting his party. He 
married A,Iarv Robinson, also a native of Westmoreland county, a daughter of 
John Robinson, who was one of the pioneer settlers, and a soldier in the Revolu- 
tionary war, and whose wife was Isabella Guft'ey, a sister of John Guffey, the 
ancestor of the numerous and widely dispersed Guffey family. 

John R. Bell, son of David and Alary (Robinson) Bell, was born in West- 
moreland county, December 17, 1824. He was a man of considerable ability 
and served the public in various important positions. He was a school teacher 
for a number of years : served as justice of the peace in Donegal township, and 
in 1879 was elected clerk of the county courts, a position which he acceptably 
occupied for three years. After 1883 he lived a retired life. He was a staunch 
Democrat, and always took an active part in political affairs. His first wife 
was Margaret Singer, a daughter of Samuel and Jane (Matthews) Singer. 
Their children were: Airs. Emma Lenhart, of Greensburg: Albert H., and 
Airs. Alay AI. Cairns, deceased. The mother of these children having died, 
Air. Bell married Alargaret Kalp, and to them were born three children, among 
whom was James E. Bell, secretary and treasurer of the Alerchant"s Trust Com- 
pany of Greensburg, Pennsylvania. 

Albert H. Bell, second child and only son of John R; and Alargaret 
( Singer) Bell, attended the public and private schools of Westmoreland cunty, 
laying an excellent foundation for advanced studies in Mount Union College, 
which he entered at the age of nineteen years, and where he pursued a two 
years course. Following the example of his father and grandsire, he was a 
school teacher in his early manhood, teaching for seven years in \\'estmoreland 
county, and conducting a normal class at Alount Pleasant for one year. Dur- 



30 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTV. 

ing his father's term of service as county clerk, from 1880 to 1883, he served 
as deputy clerk, entering upon his duties with the advantage of a previous six 
months experience (in 1876) as clerk in the office of the prothonotary. While 
faithfully discharging his duties as deputy clerk, he was also at the same time 
engaged in the stud\- of law under the preceptorship of James S. jMoorhcad 
and Hon. John B. Ilcnch, judge of the superior court, beginning his reading in 
the same year in which he entered upon his official duties. He was admitted 
to the bar in 1884, since which time he has been successfully engaged in the 
practice of his profession. He is well equipped, industrious, and takes rank 
with the foremost of his professional colleagues. He is a member of the 
United Presbyterian church of Grecnsburg, in which he has long served as an 
elder. He has always been deeply interested in education, served six years on 
the school board of Grecnsburg, five years as secretary, and for the past nine 
years a member of the board of trustees of Westminster College. He is 
also a member and past officer of the State Educational .\ssociation, and is a 
life member of the board of trustees of the INIorrison Underwood Donation 
Fund, a trust created for the benefit of the Grecnsburg High School. Mr. 
Bell married, March 19, 1885, INlary C. Clarke, of Grecnsburg, a daughter of 
Judge James C. Clarke. Their children were : James Clarke and Mary M. 
Bell, now iiursuing their studies in Westminster College, and .Mliert H. 
.Bell. Jr. 

DANIEL .\. ARTER, one of the leading physicians of Grecnsburg, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, was born in Salem township, Colum- 
biana county, Ohio, October 26, 1828, the son of Colonel Simon and Elizabeth 
(Burger) Arter. He is of English descent. His grandfather, .'\braham 
Arter, was born in Maryland. He led a quiet, exemplary life, and was a con- 
sistent church member. He removed in 1802, to Columbiana county, Ohio. 
The wife of Abraham Arter was Magdalena Hahn, and among their children 
was a son, Simon Arter. 

Simon Arter, the father of Daniel A. .\rter, was born near Strasburg. 
Maryland, where he was reared and trained to the life of a farmer. In political 
belief he was a Whig, and afterwards a Republican, and was noted for being 
upright and liberal in his dealings. He was an active member of the Evangeli- 
cal Lutheran church, and was elected colonel in a militia organization. He 
married, in 1824, Elizabeth Burger, daughter of Daniel Burger, of Ijcdford 
county, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Arter was born in 1806. Her grandfather, 
Nicholas Burger, emigrated to this country from Switzerland, settling in Bed- 
ford county, and in 1806 removed to the section that is now Columbiana county, 
Ohio. Seven sons and four daughters were born to Colonel and Mrs. Arter, 
among them Dr. Daniel Arter. The death of Colonel Arter occurred February 
27, 1883, after a useful and well spent life. 

Daniel A. Arter attended the public schools of his native place, and later 
the New Lisbon Academy from which he was graduated in 1847. Having de- 
termined to become a medical practitioner, he entered into the study of medicine 
under the preceptorship of Dr. D. Springer, of New Lisbon, Ohio. He con- 
tinued the study of liis chosen profession in the Cincinnati Eclectic Medical 
College, where his industry and earnestness soon won for him an honorable 
place in his class. He entered into practice in Blairsville, Indiana county, 
Pennsylvania, and after a five months residence in that i)lace he removed to 
Lockport. Dr. Arter removed, August 2, 185 1, to Grecnsburg, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, where he was recognized as one of the leading physicians 




^.A faf^'-^^'-S), 




. L_ac3et- 'f-&ir ■ 





HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTY. 31 

of the town, conducting an active and prosperous practice. There has probably 
been no other physician in this part of the state that had a hu-ger chentele, his 
operations extending throughout Westmoreland and into the counties of 
Indiana, Armstrong, Cambria, Fayette, and Allegheny, and which is an evi- 
dence of his widespread popularity and thoroughness as a physician. He has 
been a hard and incessent worker, but with all this he is well preserved, hale 
and hearty — looking many years younger than he is. He was one of the or- 
ganizers of the Westmoreland National Bank, and stockholder in same ; also 
served as director of the Greensburg Building and Loan Association from De- 
cember 3, 1877, to December 4, 1882; as president from December 4, 1882, 
to October 5, 1885. He resigned the presidency, was re-elected director De- 
cember 5, 1886, and has been a director ever since. Dr. Arter is pre-eminently 
a self-made man. Beginning with no capital but ambition and a determination 
to win, he soon acquiretl a lucrative practice and an honorable place in the 
world of his profession, and is the owner of considerable valuable real estate, 
having handled considerable property. His political affiliations are with the 
Republican party, and he takes a deep and lasting interest in the welfare of 
that organization. He is a member of the Jr. O. U. A. M., R. A., A. O. U. W., 
anil Philanthropy Lodge, Xo. 225, F. and A. M., and trustee of Masonic Fund of 
Greensburg, Pennsylvania. He is a consistent member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and has constantlv held the office of trustee since 1865 except 
about fourteen months. 

Dr. Arter married (first) in -1851, Mary Jane McCune, daughter of Sam- 
uel McCune, of Blairsville, Pennsylvania. Their children were: Charlotte B., 
born March 3, 1852, wife of Charles R. Miller, of Greensburg; Mary E., born 
October 15, 1854, married \\'. B. Stanley, a mechanic, of Salem, Ohio; S. Mar- 
cus, born November 17, 1856, married Sarah E. Loughrey, and is clerk in the 
county register's office. Mrs. Arter died in 1856, and Dr. Arter married (sec- 
ond) October 15, 1857, Caroline A. Miller, daughter of Jacob M. Miller. 
Their children were : Elsie B., born October 22, 1858, and Anna S., born July 
II, 1863, married H. S. Sembower, of Uniontown, Pa., and died June 18, 1888. 
]\Irs. Caroline A. Arter died April 24, 1894. 

PAL'L HL'GUS GAITHER, one oi Greenburg's leading attorneys, 
was born in Beaver, Pennsylvania, March 26, 1852. His earliest American 
ancestor was John Gaither (English), settled at Jamestown, Virginia, in 
1621. His grandfather, on the paternal side, was Zachariah Gaither. His 
father's name was Samuel, and he was born in Washington county, Mary- 
land. (Jctober 26, 1806. He was by profession an attorney-at-law. Mr. 
(_;aithcr's mother was Lydia Hugus Gaither, born August 15, 1812, in Som- 
erset county, Pennsylvania. Her father was Michael Hugus, whose early 
ancestors were French Huguenots. 

Mr. Gaither was raised in Somerset. Pennsylvania, and studied law with 
his father. He began the practice of his profession in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, 
in 1875, being at that time admitted to the Westmoreland county bar. He 
located at Greensburg in February, 1886, in jjartnership with Mr. J. A. 
Marchand, solicitor of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. His present 
j;artner is the Hon. Cyrus E. Woods. Mr. Gaither has long been known as 
one of the leadin.g members of the bar of Westmoreland county. In his 
office work, his long connection with the Pennsylvania railroad, and his. ex- 
tensive corporation practice are sufficient warrantv for his reputation for 
ability in that direction. He was a candidate for judge in 1895, and stood 



32 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

so high in the estimation of his party that he had no opposition for ths 
nomination. He was defeated at the November election, however, the county 
going overwliehiiingly Repubhcan ; ijut he came from the contest with no 
bitterness of feehng and with his reputation and integrity unassailed. Among 
some of the cases m which Air. Gaither was prominently concerned are those 
of Robb vs. Carnegie, 145 Pa. 324, a case which became prominent in the 
courts of Pennsylvania, by reason of the important legal questions involved. 
Also that of Baker vs. Westmoreland and Cambria fviatural Gas Company, 
157 Pa. 593; the case of Clarke et al. vs. Pennsylvania Railroad Company, 
in which the rights of riparian owners were involved, and which is reported 
in 145 Pa. 438. Also the case of Whitehead vs. Jones, 197 Pa. 511, deciding 
the question of the rights of tenants in common, with respect to a very 
valuable tract of land ; anil also the case of Case Manufacturing Company, 
plaintiff in error, vs. Peter H. Saxman et al., which was tried in the circuit 
court of the United States, at Pittsburg; appealed to the supreme court of 
the United States, and argued in that court on January 16, 1891 ; reported 
in One Hundred and Thirty-eighth United States supreme court report, 
page 431. This case involved the consideration of the law with respect to 
the novation of contracts ; evidence that notes were received as payment, 
and acts of a financial manager as binding on his company. Mr. Gaither 
is a lawyer of versatile ability, and can excel in any branch of the profession 
which he enters. Like most country lawyers his practice has not been ex- 
clusively in any one line. We believe, however, that he is seen at his best 
in the trial of a corporate case, when arguing questions of law to the bench, 
or upon a review of his cause in the appellate courts. As a jury lawyer, 
moreover, he has shown an ability approximating that of the ablest advocates 
of his time. He has long been a member of the Presbyterian church. He has 
traveled extensively in Europe and Palestine, and has made many addresses 
in non-denominational work. 

WILLIAM B. PARKS, a prosperous business man of Greens- 
burg, was born September 13, 1838, in the vicinity of Courtney Station, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, a son of James and Mary (Woods) Parks 
James Parks (.father) was born in Tyrone, Ireland, where he was reared 
and educated, attending the common schools adjacent to his home. When 
twenty-five years of age he determined to seek a new home for himself amid 
new surroundings and accordingly emigrated to the United States, settling 
in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he spent the remainder of his 
days. At the early age of fifteen years he married, and the death of his wife 
occurred nine months later. He married a second time, this wife dying 
one year later, survived by one child, and at the age of twenty-five years 
he married his third wife, whose maiden name was Mary Ann Woods, in 
Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, and they had eight children : Alexander, de- 
ceased ; Martha, Nancy, Alice, deceased ; Ann Jane, William B., mentioned 
hereafter : Thomas, and James, deceased. 

William B. Parks received the educational advantages afforded by the 
common schools of that day, attending those in the First ward in Allegheny 
City until he was thirteen years of age. He then engaged in the trade of 
brick making with his father, becoming an expert mechanic, and at the age 
of tvventy-two years began an apprenticeship at the trade of machinist, which 
he followed for twelve years. He then returned to his former trade, brick 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTY. 33 

iiiakiii'T, at wb.ich he labcircd for twenty con.'secutive years, and at the ex- 
piration' of this period of time located in Greensbtirg, Westmoreland county, 
established a general merchandise business, and has conducted the same 
with a large degree of success up to the present time (1905). Mr. Parks 
married, lulv 25, 1862, Amanda Baker, daughter of Joseph Baker, who 
bore him "three children, all now deceased. Her death occurred December 
23, 1865. Mr. Parks married for his second wife Eliza Brugh, a daughter 
of'lacob and Catherine (Pool) Brugh, the ceremony being performed March 
28," 1868. Their children were : William B., married Tilly Askil : Catherine,. 
married Frank Peebling; C)ma Stone: Thomas, married Ida Augustine; James 
deceased, married Lizzie Orr ; and Pearl, deceased. 

JOSEPH KE;\IP ROBIXSOX, proprietor of the Greensburg 
Steam Laundrv. was born in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, March 11, 1862, 
the son of William and Maria AI. (Kemp J Robinson. 

The American ancestor was Irwin Robinson (i), who was a native 
of Ennis Killen, county of Fennaugh, Ireland. Being an English subject, 
when the Revolution came on in America, he was drafted into service and 
sent to this country to take part in that struggle. He was through the 
whole conflict as a British solilier. including the battle of Yorktown. He 
carried a Bible in his pocket, and it was struck by a Yankee bullet, cutting 
quite a good-sized hole in the book. At another time he was struck by a 
bullet in his arm, which ball he carried the remainder of his days. He was 
present at the surrender' of Lord Cornwallis, captured by W' ashington, and 
after peace was declared returned to England. He soon found he had been 
fighting on the wrong side, and although entitled to a pension from the 
En.glisii government, he refused to accept it. and later became one of the 
most loval Americans. He studied medicine for three years and practiced his 
profession, especially in surgery. 

His love affair was indeed quite full of romance. At twenty-five years 
of age he was a manly fellow, Ave feet nine inches high ; hair brown and 
straight. He "fell in love" with Catherine Elliott, a beautiful slender figure. 
She had dark brown eyes and wore curly ringlets. She was but fifteen \ears 
of age, and for this reason they were forbidden to marry. Several times 
her parents locked her up in her bed-chamber. The house was a cottage 
of one story. At the time of the elopement her parents had kept her full; 
a month in her room, her bed being pushed against the wall made of stone, 
but the girl was not to be outwitted, and silently worked her plans to com- 
pletion. She finally succeeded in getting a hole through the wall large 
enou,gh to let herself out and on one dark night she crept through (the moon 
bein,g invisible) and met her lover and they rode away on horseback and 
were married. They became the parents of George and Jnlm Robinson. 
These three, with the Elliott family, left England for Amiriia in 1702. 
They came in a sailing vessel and were on the ocean from May until Sep- 
tember and encountered fearful storms. Mrs. Irwin Robinson brnught plenty 
of flax along, thinking, it is related, that she could not get it "in the woods; 
of America." They located in what is now Blair county, Pennsylvania. They 
purchased land of a Mr. Hollidav. where now stands the city of Hollidays 
burg. Pennsylvania. The Elliotts settled in the Ligonicr valley, between' 
Fairfield and Ross Furnace. The daughter's love of parents caused them 
to settle in a less productive country four miles southwest of where Boliver 

2-3 



34 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTY 



stands to-day. Chambersburg was the nearest place at wliich supplies could 
then be procured. They followed a trail across the wild country on pack- 
horses midst numerous tribes of Indians. Land was cheap, four dollars 
per acre. 

Irwin Robinson was a Methodist, but Quaker in habits and language. 
Mrs. Robinson's mother's name was Mary Woods. She had been a member 
of the Church of England (Episcopalian), but became a Methodist and 
three of her sons became Methodist preachers. The whole family were 
•zealous in church work. Irwin Robinson and wife, the American founder 
of this family, had twelve children : George, John, Jane, Hance, Irwin, 
Thomas, Mary, James, William, Elliott, Christopher and Elizabeth. George 
was born July 5, 1788, died November 3, 1869. He was the grandfather 
of Joseph K. Robinson, whose name heads this sketch. He married Susanna 
Brinker, born May 23, 1795, and died August 7, 1887. They settled about 
four miles from Greensburg, Pennsylvania, on a farm. Methodist services 
were frequently held at their home. Their children were: William, Susanna, 
Elizabeth, Margaret, Mary, John, Henry, Jacob, Daniel, and James. The 
three latter always resided in Greensburg, Pennsylvania . 

I 11) ^\'illiam Robinson, father of Joseph K., of the above named family, 
w-as born in Hempfield township, March 19, 1818, and' died May 31, 1884 
He was a merchant, owning a store in Greensburg for many years. He 
was a man of much intelligence and a devoted Christian and prominent mem- 
ber of the Methodist church. He was for many years a class leader. Po- 
liticallv he was a hearty supporter of the Republican party, and was an active 
member of the A. F. and A. jNI., holding the various offices of the order. 
He married Maria Margaret Kemp, daughter of Solomon and Mary Magdalena 
(W'entling) Kemp, March 3, 1847. She was born November 24, 1825. Her 
father's family were natives of Germany. Their children were: Emma 
Homer C. Mary S., Anna M., William, Lydia B., George F., Joseph Kemp 
of whoni further, and Jessie. 

(Ill) Of Joseph Kemp Robinson it may be said that he received his 
education in the Greensburg schools and learned the stone-cutter's trade, 
following the same for six years. For five years prior to this, however, he 
was a news agent at Greensburg. He established himself in the laundry 
business in Greensburg in 1887, and is now located in a three-story brick 
building. His business extends to thirty-five towns in Westmoreland county. 
His plant is fully equipped with all modern lanndrv machinery. He was a 
member of Company I, Tenth Regiment Pennsylvania National Guards, for 
five years, but was never called out for actual service. He is identified with 
the Woodmen of the W'orld, and is a member of the First Reformed Church 
at Greensburg. He married, June 5, 1893, near Greensburg, Pennsylvania, 
Mary Margaret Kunkle, daughter of Amos and Sarah (Kepple) Knnkle, 
farmers of Westmoreland county, residing in Hempfield townsliip. ( See 
elsewhere in this work for the Kunkle family history). Their children were: 
Helen K.. W'illiam H., Joseph J., Sarah Maria and Carl Emery, all born ni 
Greensburg, Pennsylvania, ^fr. Robinson's life as a business man has been 
devoted to three occupations only — five years a news agent, six years a stone- 
cutter and eighteen years a laundryman. He is an unassuming, thorough- 
going business man, whom to know is but to admire and respect. He is 
also the proprietor of the large auditorium building on Maple avenue, a 
building devoted to general entertainment. 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTY. 35 

AAIOS POOL W'E.WER. The names of two well-known fam- 
ilies of \\'estmoreland county are borne by Amos Pool Weaver, of Greens- 
burg, one representing his paternal ancestry and the other the family to 
which his mother belonged. Both patronymics are synonymous with good 
citizenship. 

lacol) P. \\'eaver, son of Jacob and Sarah (Kichl) Weaver, was born 
October 9, 1843, in Greensburg, and served as a conductor on the Penn- 
svlvania railroad under Andrew Carnegie. Later he was engaged in the 
planing mill and lumber yard business in Ludwick borough, under the firm 
name of Pool & \\'eaver, for thirty years was a farmer in Unity township, 
and in 1906 retired from the farm and resided in Greensburg. During 
the Civil war he served as a private in Company C, Fifty-fourth Regiment, 
Pennsylvania A'olunteers, commanded by Colonel Thomas Gallagher. He 
is a Republican in politics, and is a member of Zion Evangelical Lutheran 
Church. He married, December 24, 1868, Mary Jane Pool, whose family 
history is given below. 

Mr. and Mrs. \\'eaver had children: Minnie S., Amos Pool, mentioned 
hereafter ; Jacob P., Jennie P., Howard Z., Samuel P., and' Sallie K. 

Zachariah Pool was born March 21, 1780, in Baltimore county, Mary- 
land, of English ancestry on his father's side and through his mother of 
German descent. Earlv in life he went to Chambersburg. Pennsylvania, 
and in 1812 moved thence to Hempfield township, Westmoreland county. 
His calling was that of a shoemaker, which he followed in connection with 
farming. Although never an aspirant to office he was elected in 1827 tax 
collector of Hempfield' township. His political principles were those of the 
Democratic party, and he was a member of the Evangelical Lutheran church. 
j\lr. Pool married, September 19, 1805, Barbara PlufFman, of Chambers- 
burg, and fourteen children were born to them, one of whom, Samuel, is 
mentioned hereafter. ]\Ir. Pool's industrious and useful life was prolonged 
well-nigh to the century limit, his death occurring December 6, 1877, when 
he had reached the extraordinary age of ninety-seven years, eight months and 
fifteen days. His descendants were numerous, including, in addition to 
his fourteen children, one hundred and one grandchihlren, one hundre;d 
and forty great-grandchildren and nine great-great-grandchildren, in all two 
hundred and sixty four. 

Samuel Pool, fifth child of Zachariah and Barbara (.Huft'iian) Pool, 
was born August 12, 181 1, and followed the trade of a boot and shoemaker. 
In the sphere of politics he adhered to the Republicans, and in matters of 
religion to the Evangelical Lutheran church, of which he was a member. 
He married. September 18, 1834. .Sophia Fredrica Bierer, and of their eleven 
children the seventh was a daughter. Mary Jane, born May 19, 184S, in 
Hempfield township, and became the wife of Jacob P. Weaver, as mentioned 
above. Mr. Pool died September 29, i8go. He was a man whose character 
was above suspicion, and he left behind him an honored name. 

Amos Pool Weaver, son of Jacob P. and Mary Jane fPool) Weaver, 
Avas born September 9, 1871. in Greensburg, Westmoreland couiitv, and is 
a blacksmith by trade, making a specialty of that 1)ranch of the business 
known as horseshoeing. He is a public-spirited citizen, giving evidence of 
being such by serving as a member of hose company No. 2, Greensburg 
fire department, and officiating as treasurer of the company. He also belongs 
to the Grand Fraternity, of which he is treasurer, and the Woodmen of the 



36 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTV. 

World. He is a member of Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church. IMr. Weaver 
married, December 22, 1898, in Greensburg, ( )ma Stone, born December 2, 
1873, in Alleghen\^ City, Allegheny county, daughter of William B. and 
Eliza A. Parks, the former a merchant of that place. Mr. and Mrs. Weaver 
have one child, Frank Parks, born March 17, 1904. in Greensburg. 

JAAIES E. LOUGHREY. One of Greensburg's enterprising busi- 
ness men of the younger generation is James E. Loughrey. He is a grand- 
son of John Loughrey, who was born in Derry, Ireland, emigrated to tlie 
United States about 1835, and settled in Greensburg. He married Jane 
McFarland, and the two enjoyed the respect of their neighbors and friends 
in their new home on this side of the sea. 

James F. Loughrey, son of John and Jane (McFarland) Loughrey, was 
born in 1849, in Greensburg. where he received his education in the common 
schools. When about sixteen years of age he left school and learned the 
marblecutter's trade with a firm in Pittsburg, and this calling he followed 
all his life. In 1877 he married Frances E., daughter of David and Martha 
(Steel) Mechling, the former a farmer and a native of Germany. Mr. 
and Mrs. Loughrey had children : James E., mentioned hereafter ; Carrie E., 
married in 1902, William H. Fisher, a jeweler of Greenslnirg, and has one 
child, Frances Elizabeth ; Martha and Jane F. 

James E. Loughrey, son of James F. and I-"rances E. (Mechling) 
Loughrey, was born February 27, 1880, in Greensburg, and was educated 
in the common schools of his native town. After leaving school at the age 
of . sixteen he obtained employment with the Greensburg Steam Laundry, 
where he remained four years and a half. He then became connected with 
the Westmoreland Laundry, with which he was associated one year aiTd 
a half. At the end of that time, 1901, he moved into his own building and 
established the Keystone Laundry. The undertaking prospered and he is 
still busily engaged on the same site. Mr. Loughrey's syinpathies and affil- 
iations arc with the Republican party, to which he gives the support and 
encouragement of his vote. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM CHICHESTER. One of the foremost 
business men of Greensburg is Frederick William Chichester. He is a rep- 
resentative of an old New England family which has been for two hundred 
years resident in Fairfield county, Connecticut. His great-great-grandfather. 
Abraham Chichester, is mentioned in the annals of the Revolutionary war 
as a colonel in the Patriot army. The race has been largely engaged in 
the sphere of commerce. George Alonzo Chichester, a cattle drover, was 
the father of George Edward Chichester, who is a leaf-tobacco merchant 
of Danbury, Connecticut. He married Fannie Van Vallier De Klyn. and 
four children were born to them, three of whom survive : Frederick WilHam, 
of whom later; Edward G., a broker in Pittsburg; and Mary Antoinette, 
at home. 

Frederick A\'illiam Chichester, son of George Edward and Fannie \'an 
\'allier ( De Klyn) Chichester, was born August 9. 1873. in Danbury Con- 
necticut, where he received his .education in the public schools. From early 
bovhood he had the advantage of a thorough business training under the 
guidance of his father, and in 1890 was offered and accented a position as 
general bookkeeper with the Danbury National Bank, where he remained 
four years. In 1894 he went on the road for his father, covering territory 



^ 





^^/^. yj ^^:i^!>^^u^^'tr^ 







1 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 37 

extending from Xew York city to Omaha, Nebraska. After working in 
this capacity for about two years he went to Pittsburg, where he was as- 
sociated with a coal company until 1898. He then removed to Greensburg, 
where he engaged with the firm of Maxwell & Wildman, succeeding that 
firm under name of Chichester & Hudson. In 1902 he engaged in the whole- 
sale grocery business and has since organized the Westmoreland Grocery, 
an incorporated company, and the pioneers of the wholesale grocery business 
in Westmoreland county. The enterprise has prospered beyond the expec- 
tations of its originators and the business is growing rapidly. Mr. Chichester 
is a member of Union Lodge, No. -40, F. and A. M., and Eureka Chapter, 
No. 10, both of Danburv, Connecticut. He also belongs to Pittsburg Com- 
mandery, No. i, K. T.,' Syria Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., both of Pitts- 
burg, in addition to being identified with Greensburg Lodge, No. 511, B. 
P. O. E. He is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church. Mr. Chichester 
married in 1901, Laura, daughter of Josiah Wagner, a prominent farmer of 
Irwin, Pennsylvania, one child, George DeKlyn. 

JAMISON FA]\IILY. Robert S. Jamison was born near Greens- 
burg, Pennsylvania. July 13, 1835, and died March 14, 1903, at Redlands, 
California, where he had gone a few weeks before on account of ill health. 
In his youth he received a fair common school education, and having been 
reared on a farm became a land-holder almost as soon as he was of legal 
age. Although devoting much time to other pursuits, he was a farmer all 
his life, and was a leader in scientific methods for improving the land, using 
labor-saving machinery and introducing new and better strains of live stock. 
He took an active part in establishing the Westmoreland Agricultural So- 
ciety, being its president for a luunber of years. In early manhood his mind 
was attracted to the growing importance of the coal and coke industry of 
western Pennsylvania. With keen foresight of the needs of the future, he 
began to study the coal basins of his own locality. In 1880. associating him- 
self with others, he began buying coal lands extensively in Westmoreland 
county and continued to do so for more than twenty years, and time has 
amply proved the wisdom of these ventures. All the properties purchased 
by him have become incorporated into large and flourishing industries. At 
the time of his death he was president and large owner of the coal and coke 
company that bears his name. In private life he was genial, fair, uniformly 
courteous and charitable. He was a member of the Second Reformed Church 
in Greensburg, and one of its officers for many years. He married Caroline 
Wible, also native to Greensburg, who died ?ilay 24, 1905. Both are buried 
in St. Clair cemetery. The names of their ten children are : Mary Emma, 
died 1877: William W., Joseph Henrv. died 1865; John :\[.. Thomas S., 
Charles M.. Robert S., Hugh D., Richard H., and Jay C. "Jamison. 

The family history in this country begins with l-'rancis famison, Sr., 
who with his wife, four sons anil two daughters emigrated from the north 
of Ireland in 1764, and settled in Franklin county, Pennsylvania. His chil- 
dren were: John, Robert, Margaret. Rosanna, Marmaduke, and Francis. 
IVIr. and Mrs. Francis Jamison, Sr., lived to a ripe old age, and both died 
while on a visit to their children in Westmoreland county and are buried 
at Ridge Church. 

II._ John Jamison (1749-1819) came to Westmoreland counlv in 1769 
with his brother Robert, and each took patent to about three hundred acres 



•^8 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

of land. Robert Jamison located in Unity township, and his grandson, 
Joseph Jamison, owns and still lives at the old homestead. John Jamison 
located in Hempfield township, and after remaining for more than one hun- 
dred years in his family the land is now owned by the Westmoreland Water 
Company, the present reservoir covering the site of the original buildings. 
In 1774 John Jamison married Janet Martin*, daughter of John Martin, 
of Big Cove, Fulton county, Pennsylvania. She was a sister of Hugh Martin^ 
who also came to Westmoreland county about that time. The children of 
Mr. and Mrs. John Jamison were: Francis, John, Hugh, Robert, Benjamin, 
James, Margaret. Janet, Mary, and Martha. Hugh and James inherited 
the old homestead and spent their lives upon it. 

ni. Hugh Jamison (1785-1873), father of Robert S. Jamison, married 
Jane Stuart in 1817. A farmer by occupation, he taught for many winters 
in the public schools near his home. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. 
His children were: John (1818-1902), Daniel Stuart (1822-1891), Hugh 
Martin, now living in the state of Texas; Margaret J., now living in Greens- 
burg, and Roljert S. Jamison (1835-1903). 

WILLIAM STOKES TURNEY, one of the prosperous, active busi- 
ness factors of Greensburg, engaged in the commission and storage business, 
was born in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, July 7, 1857, the son of Robert Williams, 
and Elizabeth (Cook) Turney. 

(T) The great-great-grandfather was a native of Germany, emigrated to 
America and settled in eastern Pennsylvania, probably before the middle of the 
eighteenth century. His name was Dorney, but like many other names in this 
country, it has undergone a change, being now spelled Turney. 

(il) Daniel Turney, the great-grandfather, was born in the province of 
Pennsylvania, eastern part, whence several of his brothers departed for new 
homes. One settled in Ohio, another in Tennessee, one located in North Caro- 
lina, and Daniel Turnev crossed the Allegheny mountains to Westmoreland 
county, settling near the site of "ye ancient" Hannahstown, which was Greens- 
burg's predecessor as the countyseat. He was a farmer. Among his eight 
children was one called Jacob, Sr., the third child. 

(Ill) Jacob Turney, Sr., son of Daniel Turney (II), was born in 1788, 
early in life located at Greensburg, and afterwards held the office of county 
commissioner, county treasurer, etc. He was an active Democrat, and on his 
return from a state convention at Harrisburg, to which he had been sent as a 
delegate, he contracted a cold while crossing the mountains, from the effects of 
whicli he died some years later, January 4, 1827. His wife, to whom he was 
married January 23, 1810, was Margaret Singer, of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, 
born May 11, 1792. who bore him seven children: Daniel, Nancy W'illiams 
(deceased), Samuel Singer (deceased), formerly editor of the Aro^iis. and later 
postmaster at Greensburg for twelve years. Lucian B. (deceased), Lucinda, 
married Richard B. Kenly ; Robert Williams, and Jacob, Jr., all of whom are 
now deceased. 

(IV) Robert Williams Turney, son of Jacol) Turney, Sr., and Margaret 
(Singer) Turnev. was born in Greensburg. Pennsylvania, January 17, 1822, 
died Julv 28, 1893. He learned the trade of cabinetmaker. Later he was en- 
gaged by the Pennsylvania company to survey its original line, and when com- 



*For the story of the capture of Janet Martin ly the Indians, seepage 114 of the first 
volume of this series. 



HISTORY OF H'ESTMORELAXD COUXTV. 39 

pleted he was appointed as the first passenger conthictor on the system. Sub- 
sequently he was made ticket and freight agent at Greeiisburg borough, which 
otifice he' held at the date of his death. He married Elizabeth Cook, born Sep- 
tember 21, 1820, and still surviving. She is the daughter of David and Mary 
Cook. David Cook descended from Captain James Cook, of England, and was 
a son of John Cook, of the same country, who settled in Hagerstown, Maryland. 
David Cook was born in Hagerstown, ?^Iaryland, in 1793, and died in 1865. 
He came to Greensburg, Pennsylvania, and clerked in a store. He was also 
countv commissioner several terms, as well as register of will and recorder, be- 
sides serving two terms as associate judge of Westmoreland county. He was 
an ow-n cousin of Governor George Geary, of Pennsylvania. He married JMary 
McKinney, who came from Glasgow. Scotland, when but fifteen years of age. 
She was the daughter of Alexander ^IcKinney, who came from Scotland and 
settled at Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, but later removed to Greensburg. The 
children of David Cook and wife were : William A., Mary, Margaretta, Jane 
Ann, Theressa, and Charles. The children of Robert W. and Elizabeth ( Cook) 
Turney were: Anzonnetta, David C, Jacob, Anna Belle, Robert W., Jr., Mar- 
cellus R., William Stokes, Mary Elizabeth, and Margaret. 

( V) William Stokes Turney, the seventh child of Robert W. and Eliza- 
beth ( Cook) Turney. born July 7, 1857. at Greensburg. Pennsylvania, received 
a good common school education and was made assistant freight agent at 
Greensburg. Later he embarked in the produce and commission business at 
Greensburg, which line he is still operating in. He votes the Democratic 
ticket. He has been a school director in his borough for seventeen years. He 
has served as deacon and elder in the First Reformed church of Greensburg, of 
which he has long been a member. Mr. Turney has been twice married (first) 
March 26, 1877, to Mattie R. Fry, born February 12, 1858, died August 25, 
1891. Their children were: Harry L.. born Xovember 5, 1878, died August 
18; 1897: Edward K., born August 24, 1880: E. AIcC, born August 23, 1882. 
For his second wife, ]\Ir. Turnev married, December 29, 1892, Priscilla Etta 
Fry. She was born May 18, 1871. By this marriage, one daughter, Eliza- 
beth Cook, was born Ts'ovember 6, 1893. Both of Mr. Turney's wives were the 
daughters of Isaac and Margaret Fry, of Youngstown, Pennsylvania. 

LE\T PORTSER. A list of Greensburg's respected citizens would 
be incomplete without the name of Levi Portser, wliose grandfather, Christian 
Portser, came across the sea from Germany as a young man and became a 
farmer in York county. Later he moved to Westmoreland, settling in Hemp- 
field tow'nship on what is now the Sherey farm. He afterward sold this prop- 
ertv and removed to Delmont, having purchased a farm just outside of the 
town, where he lived during the remainder of his life. 

Joshua Portser, son of Christian Portser, was born in Yr)rk county, and 
learned the trade of blacksmith in Greensburg. After finishing his apprentice- 
ship he opened a shop in Delmont which he subsec|ueutly moved to the salt 
works, returning later to Delmont, where he conducted a shop- until 1833. 
He then bought a farm of one hundred and six acres in Hempfield township, 
four miles north of Greensburg. where he resided during the remainder of his 
life. In politics he was first a Whig and later a Republican. He was a mem- 
ber of the Lutheran church, yir. Portser married Elizabeth Martz, of Frank- 
lin township, and of their nine children six are living: Mary, widow of Simon 
Row; Williani, who lives on the homestead: Levi, of whom later: i\Iatilda, 
wife of Jacob Mainhart, of Pittsburg: James D., of Manor Station : and Sarah, 



40 HISTORY OF U'ESTMORELAXD COUNTY. 

wife of James Orr, of Greensburg. Mr. IVirtser, the father of the family, died 
in 1874, at the age of seventy-one. 

Levi Portser, son df Joshua and EUzabeth (Martz) Portser, was born 
January 29, 1837, in Hempfield township, and received his education in the 
common scliools. At twenty years of age he apprenticed himself to the trade 
of plasterer, which has since formed the main business of his life, although he 
has engaged to some extent in contracting and building. He learned his trade 
in Greensburg, and since 1857 that town has been his home, his part in the 
building and growth of the place having been no inconsiderable one. From 
1893 to 1898 he owned valuable coal lands in Mellan and Franklin townships, 
Fayette county, Pennsylvania, and rt the present time is the possessor of coal 
lands in \"irginia wliich he is developing with the ex]iectations of beginning 
shipments this s])ring. In 1903 be built the handsome modern residence in 
East Greensburg which he now occupies. Mr. Port.ser served part of an un- 
expired term as burgess of East Greensburg, being appointed to finish the un- 
served time of Dr. George Culbertson. He is now |)resident of the school 
board. He has taken all the Masonic degrees up to that of Knight Temjilar, 
and is one of the oldest members in Greensburg in point of membership, having 
joined in 1863. He is a Democrat in politics. During the Civil war he was 
among the three months men sent out in 1863. January 5, 1870, Mr. Portser 
married Isabella, daughter of Robert and Caroline Cochran, then residents of 
Indiana county, Pennsylvania. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Portser were the parents of six 
children : Rol)ert K., now an attorney in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, who served 
in the Spanish-.A.merican war, in the Philippines: Iden M., a Greensburg phy- 
sician; Carrie B., wife of Joseph W. Steel, of Greensburg; Bessie V., resides 
with her father; Wallace W., who graduated from Bucknel University, and is 
now employed by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, with an engineering 
corps: Edwina I\I., deceased. Mrs. Portser died December 5, 1903. 

CURTIX PHILIP STEIXER. It is safe to .say that no citizen of 
South Greensburg is better or more favorably known to the population at large 
than is Curtin Philip Steiner. His great-grandfather, who emigrated to this 
country from Germany, was the father rf six sens, the names of five of whom 
have been preserved: Philip, Joseph, John, Henry, and Jacob. 

John C. Steiner, son of Philip Steiner, mentioned above, was born '"^ 1840, 
in \\estmoreland county, where he grew up on a farm and learned the ti , if 
a shoemaker, whicii he followed for some years. Later he engaged in farming 
and other occupations. In July, 1864, he enlisted in Company K, Two Hun- 
dred and Eleventh Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, serving- until th.' close 
of the war, and receiving a wound in the bead from a spent ball. Wb'"j living 
in New Stanton he was for fifteen years a justice of the neace, and since his re- 
moval to Scottdale, in 189=;. has held the same office. He belongs to the G. A. 
R., the Grange, the J. O.' U. A. M., the I. O. O. F., and the K'. of M. He is 
one of the leading Democrats of Scottdale, and is a member of the Lutheran 
church Mr. Steiner married Harriet C. Pool, and their children are : Lizzie 
M.. wife of Luther M. Hays, of East Greensburg; Curtin Philip, of whom 
later; Catherine T., wife of James E. Funks, of New Stanton: Charles E., of 
Scottdale; Anna M.. at home; Joseph M., engaged in the cigar business in 
Scottdale: Samuel O., in partnership with his brother Joseph ^I. ; and Sarah 
H., at home. 

Curtin Philip .Steiner, son of John C. and Harriet C. (Pool) Steiner, was 
born October 10, 1863, in New Stanton, and received his education in the com- 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 41 

mon scliools. ^^■l^en no more than twelve years of age he worked for neigh- 
boring farmers during harvest, and when somewhat older was employed in the 
stone quarry. About the time of attaining his majority he worked for one 
vear in a general store in New Stanton, after which he found employment as a 
locomotive fireman on the Pennsylvania Railway. This position he held four 
vears, and at the end of that time was made engineer. In 1892, after running 
his engine for three years, he resigned his position and engaged in the cigar bus- 
iness in Scottdale. In 1897 he became the proprietor of the Central Hotel in 
Scottdale, which he disposed of by sale six months later. For some months 
thereafter he represented a Pittsburg house as a traveling salesman, and then 
•went to Connellsville, where he once more engaged in the cigar business. In 
January, 1900, he settled in South Greensburg, and again became the proprietor 
of a hotel which his genial qualities as a host soon made extremely popular. In 
consequence of the fact that his business speedily outgrew the dimensions of 
his building, Mr. Steiner erected, in the summer and winter of 1903, a re- 
markably fine hotel structure of light pressed brick, supplied with all the mod- 
ern hotel improvements. In April, 1904, he took possession of this building, 
which he opened under the name of the Colonial Road House and which has 
since been one of the leading hotels of Greensburg, noted alike for the admir- 
able manner in which it is conducted and for the obliging qualities of its host. 
]\Ir. Steiner also erected two residence properties in Greensburg, of which he 
is still the owner. He is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Lutheran 
church. Mr. Steiner married, August 4, 1897, Mary L. Gallagher, of Connells- 
ville. and their children are : James Donald and Joseph Curtin. 

WILLIAiNI ]\I. HUDSON, one of the leading and substantial busi- 
ness merchants of Westmoreland county, was born in Hempfield township, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, May 2, 1857, son of George and Nancy 
R. (^Mansfield) Hudson. 

He is a descendant of James Hudson, a native of Wales, who emigrated to 
the United States, locating in Chester county, Pennsylvania. On the maternal 
side. William M. Hudson is of Irish ancestry, his great-grandparents having 
lived and died in Ireland, his grandmother being the first of the family to leave 
her native land, and whose mother lived in Ireland at the advanced age of one 
hnr-?fied and five years. His paternal grandfather was James Hudson, who 
■ . .^Dcrn in Chester county, Pennsylvania. In early manhood James Hudson 
learned the trade of carpenter. He resided for some time in Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, and about 1816 removed to Westmoreland county, locating on a 
smaM'farm of about forty acres, which he purchased in Unity township, near 
Pleas'ijiit Lenity, where he lived for about twenty-five years. He then pur- 
chased a- farm of about one hundred acres near Crabtree, residing here tmtil 
four or five years prior to his death, when he removed to Allegheny township. 
He was independent in politics, voting always for the man whom he considered 
best fitted for the position. He married and had nine children, George being 
the only surviving member of his family. James Hudson's death occurred in 
Allegheny township, when he was about eighty-four years of age, and his wife, 
Mary ("McCasland) Hudson, also nassed awav in that township. 

George Hudson, father of William M. Hudson, was born in Unitv town- 
ship, November 24, 1819, received his early education in the common schools of 
his native place, and 'subsequently attended the old Greensburn^ Academy. 
^^'hen about twenty-one years of aee he commenced teaching school, continuing 
in this employment for about sixteen years, becoming one of the well-known 



42 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

early teachers of Westmoreland county. He then turned his attention to 
farming, following this occupation in Salem and Hempfield townships until 
1879, when he removed to Ludwick horough, where he lived a retired life until 
1905, when he moved into Greensburg proper. In 1849 ^i^- Hudson married 
Nancy R. Mansfield, of Unity township, daughter of Abraham and Isabella 
(McGee) Mansfield. To them eight children were born, three of whom are 
still living: William M., of whom later; Martha Alice, and George E. George 
Hudson is a Republican and is now serving his second term as member of the 
school board. He is a consistent member of the Presbyterian church, and is 
one of the esteemed men of tlie county. 

William M. Hudson was reared at home and educated in the common 
schools of his native place. In 1879 he removed to Ludwick borough with his 
parents, and for several years was in the employ of the firm of Donahue & 
Kuhns, at Crabtree, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, where he had entire 
charge of the grain business. In 1891 he became a member of the firm, and 
two years later Mr. Kuhns died, his son, J. U. Kuhns, taking his interest in the 
business. Some time later the death of Mr. Donahue occurred, and Mr. Hud- 
son and Mr. Kuhns jiurchased his interest in the business, which has since been 
conducted under the firm name of Hudson & Kuhns, and which has proved a 
very successful business. Mr. Hudson is a man of character and standing, 
has made his own way in the world, and is in every way worthy of the success 
which has crowned his efforts. In politics Mr. Hudson affiliates with the Re- 
publican party. He has served as auditor of the borough and two terms as 
councilman. As a citizen he is popular and well-liked, and has served with 
honor and credit the positions of trust and responsibility which he has held. 
He is unmarried and makes his home with his father. 

DANIEL KL'NKLE. In a list of Greensburg's most respected citi- 
zens the name of Daniel Kunkle would stand very high. Mr. Kunkle's great- 
grandfather, Jacob Kunkle, emigrated from Germany, and after a time settled 
on a farm in Westmoreland county where he lived some years, returning finally 
to his former home east of the mountains and there ending his davs. 

Jacob Kunkle had a son who passed his life in Westmoreland county, and 
was the father of Michael Kunkle. The latter was born in Sewickly township, 
and was a prosperous farmer, owning a farm one mile north of Greensburg. 
He held the rank of major m a Westmoreland county regiment, was a Democrat 
in politics and an active member of the German Reformed church. He mar- 
ried Mary Mechling, and eight children were born to them, only two of whom 
are now living: Daniel, of whom later; and Amos, a resident of Greensburg. 
Mr. Kunkle died at the age of sixty-eight, and his death was caused by an ac- 
cident with a threshing machine. 

Daniel Kunkle, son of Michael and Mary (Mechling) Kunkle, was born 
March 16, 1831, in Hempfield township, and received his education in the com- 
mon schools. At nineteen years of age he apprenticed himself to the painter's 
trade, which failing health obliged him to abandon about six years later. He- 
then- engaged in the grain and lumber business in Ludwick borough, in part- 
nership with a Mr. Lobaugh. At the end of six years Mr. Kunkle withdrew 
from the firm, and for more than fifteen years conducted a sucessful lumber 
business on his own account. He then retired and established his two sons in 
the lumber business at Ashtabula Harbor, Ohio, where the enterprise was con- 
ducted by theni for a number of years. Since his withdrawal froni business 
Mr. Kunkle has lived in retirement. He is the owner of a portion of the old 




y^d<^^J^J'i^^-^r\Acr\\><r^^rKy^^ 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 43 

homestead as well as other property. His record as a citizen bears witness to 
the regard in which he is held by his neighbors, by whom he has been twice 
elected burgess of Ludwick borough and retained four years as a member of 
the school board. His political affiliations are with the Republicans. He is a 
member of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Kunkle married in 1858, Rebecca, 
daughter of j\lason Smith, a prominent farmer of Unity township, and they 
had two sons: Harry and William. Mrs. Kunkle died in 1882. and Mr. Kun- 
kle married, October 23, 1884, Mary, daughter of Samuel Gault, by whom he 
had children: Edna; Oliver G., born March 9, 1891, aged fifteen years; 
Daniel Wrav, born April 28, 1901, aged five years; John Paul, born July 30, 
1903, aged three years. 

HON. EDWARD E\'ERETT ROBEINS, a prominent lawyer and 
financier who has served the public in various important positions, including 
that of state senator and member of congress and who rendered military serv- 
ices during the recent war with Spain as a major of United States \'olunteers, 
is of English decent, tracing his ancestry to the earliest colonial period. 

(I) Richard Robbins, his emigrant ancestor, came from England in 
i6Jo, having voluntarily expatrated himself for political reasons, his activity 
in bpposition to the restoration of the monarchy being so pronounced that in or- 
der to ensure personal safety he deemed it wise to come under an assumed 
name and in the guise of a servant. He settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts, 
where he became active in public aflfairs. 

(II) Samuel Robbins, son of Richard (i) served in the Narragansett 
(King Philip's) war, 1674-5, and was granted a tract of land in Vohuitown, 
Connecticut, by the general court. He died in Watertown, Connecticut, October 
21, 1708. 

(III) Richard Robbins, son of Samuel (2), settled upon the land above 
referred to in 1709. He married Anna Bathrich, at Cambridge, Massachusetts, t 

in 170I. - ICL^'-vi-fi'^ VVXMC^iK- '■iMAJ^^xjUlJ^ 

1 M ) William Rohbins, son of Brirrtnel (\), was born in 1795 and died i n 
Keziah ]\Iinor. 

(V) Brintnel Robbins. son of Moses (4), was born in 1756 and died in 
1836. He married Mary Boardman in 1777. He enlisted in the War of the 
Revolution at New London. Connecticut, and served in 1775-6, 1778-80 in the 
companv comanded by Captain Samuel Robbins. He participated in numerous 
battles and was commissioned ensign at the end of the war. He also bore an 
active part in the support of tlie government during the War of 1812, and built 
vessels on Lake Erie for Commodore Perry, but only received compensation 
for the work after a prolonged litigation. Before 1790, with his wife and two 
children, he removed to western Pennsylvania, s])ending the first winter in 
Connellsville, where he worked iron ore in the Turnbull furnace. He subse- 
quentlv purchased a farm at Port Royal and thence went to Long Run, where 
he built a flouring mill. He bought, in 1780, a large tract of land lying on the 
Youghiogheny river from the Pennsylvania government, and which is yet in 
the possession of his descendants. He removed in 181 2 to Pittsburg, where he 
became an extensive ship builder and coal operator, as well as farmer. He es- 
tablished the first retail milk business in Pittsburg, serving his customers frojTi 
a large can conveyed about the town on a wheel barrow by a colored servant. 
He built in 1813 two schooners which he loaded with a cargo of flour and 
cheese, for the West Indies. At New Orleans the ves.sels were manned with 
crews of Spanish sailors. They were never heard of after leaving the port. 



44 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

Brintiiel Robbins removed to Greensbiirg in 1830, where he lived the remaining 
part of his hfe. He was a pensioner of the Revolutionary war. He died July 
25, 1836, and is buried in Harold graveyard, near Greensburg. 

(VI) William Robbins, son of Brintnel (5), was born in 1795 and died in 
1834; he was married to Agnes Sloan. (5^-v.<^ ^^-«.t<^ 

(Vn) Joseph Robbins, son of AN'illiam (6) and Rarehd Gordon Robbins, 
was born at Robbins' Station, Pennsylvania, in 1824. He was married (first) 
to Rachel Robbins, and after her death, Margaret Cristy. He was the pioneer 
coal operator in the Youghiogheny district, opening up an extensive mine at 
Osceola in 1848. He was active in public affairs, served as school director for 
twelve years, and was a delegate to various Republican conventions. He was 
a Presbyterian in faith and membership. 

(\'ni) Edward Everett Robbins, son of Joseph, was born at Robbins 
Station. Pennsylvania, in September, 1861. He began his education in the 
public schools in that place, pursued advanced branches in Elders Ridge Aca- 
demy, and entered Washington and Jefferson College, from which he was a 
graduate in 1881, at the age of twenty, with the degree of master of arts, being 
sixth in a class of thirty-six. He prepared for his chosen profession in the law 
department of Columbia University, New York, and graduated in 1884, being 
admitted the same year to the bar of Westmoreland county. In the following 
year he was nominated for district attorney. He was elected to the state sen- 
ate in 1888, and served efficiently in that body for a term of six years. Mr. 
Robbins introduced and secured the passage of the bill appropriating five thous- 
and dollars to the Childrens' Aid Society, thus securing the present home for 
this deserving institution. This was the first state aid for any purpose by the 
people of Westmoreland. He also introduced the law providing for free text 
i)Ooks in the public schools, and was chairman of the judiciary committee of the 
senate. He was especially active in the movement for equalization of taxes 
and the enactment of a law for this purpose. 

During the fifty-fifth congress the Dingley tariff bill was enacted when the 
coal and iron schedules were under consideration in the house. Mr. Robbins 
addressed the committee of the whole with much force and success. His work 
in behalf of a protective tariff was both brilliant and able. His work for Cuban 
Independence and speeches for that cause were widely read and commanded at- 
tention. He visited the island of Cuba and understood the conditions there. 
Mr. Robbins was one of the three members of congress who volunteered and 
entered the army at the outbreak of hostilities with Spain and was commis- 
sioned captain and quartermaster First Brigade, Third Division, First Army 
Corps, May 14. 1898. 

In politics he is a Republican, and has borne an active part in supporting 
the principles and candidates of the party. When the Spanish-American war 
came on he offered his services to the government, and was assigned to duty as 
quartermaster with the rank of captain on the staff of General John A. Wily, 
commander of the First Brigade, Third Division, First Army Corps, at Camp 
Thomas, Georgia, by special order No. 143, issued from the adjutant-general's 
office at Washington. Mr. Robbins has long been in the National Guard of 
Pennsylvania, serving as private, lieutenant, major, brigade quartermaster, and 
commissary general of the state Dn the staff of Governor Stone. This exper- 
ience was of great value^o him in the Spanish-x\merican war, and he was de- 
tailed to the special duty of equipping and shipping troops to the front. His 
success brought him a promoti'rn, and August 21, 1898, by special order 196 
lie was made a chief quartermaster with the rank of major of United States 



I 

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THE 

NEW YORK 

f PUBLIC LIBRARY 1 

pwr.tiaiions. 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAXD COUXTV. 



45- 



\'olunteers, and placed in charge ( f the transport "Seneca," and sent with 
United States commissioners, Admiral Schley and Gordon to Porto Rico. He 
served at Ponce, San Juan, Santiago ; was in charge of the United States trans- 
ports "i\Iobile," "^"Chester," and "'Grant." After the conclusion of peace, 
Quartermaster-General Luddington offered him a commission as major in the 
regular army, but he declined and tendered his resignation and was honorably 
discharged by special order 243 of the adjutant-gjneral. issued from Washing- 
ton, receiving from the secretary of war, November 14, 1898, specially com- 
mending his services. 

\\'ith high standing in his profession, Mr. Robbins cares for a large and 
important personal practice and is also solicitor for the Baltimore and Ohio and 
the Ligonier \'alley Railroad companies, and professional adviser for various 
corporations with which he is identified, and which are large commercial and 
financial factors in the business of his city and county. He is president of the 
Garrett Coal Company, organized the Pittsburg and Baltimore Coal Company,, 
a diretor in the Safe Deposit and Trust Company, of Greensburg, the Wilmerd- 
ing National Bank of W'ilmerding, Connellsville Basin Coke Company, and a 
stockholder in other banks and industrial corporations, and in the Tribune Press 
Publishing Company, of Greensburg, a member of various clubs — the Ameri- 
cus, the Duquesne and the University. In religion he is a Presbyterian, and he 
is president of the board of trustees of the First Presbyterian church of Greens- 
burg. 

Mr. Robbins married, December 17, 1897, Luella Moore, daughter of J. 
W. and Elizabeth S. Moore, of Greensburg, Pennsylvania. They had two 
children: Edward E., born December 2, 1900; and William M., born ^larch 
26, 1902. 

JOSEPH ROBBINS was born April 4, 1824, at the Robbins home- 
stead, where he still lives. In 1847 he embarked in the coal business, opening- 
the first coal road to run on the Youghiogheny river, at Osceola, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania. His first venture was on a lease on the basis of one- 
fourth cents per bushel royalty. The coal was mined and floated down the 
river in boats, when the water was sufficiently high to carry them, and sold at 
Cincinnati, at the rate of ten cents per bushel. The means of transportation was 
extremely ventursome. about one-half of the boats being lost in the river. 
However, during the first four years of his coal business he was very success- 
ful, meeting with little or no loss, but during the fifth year he lost some boats. 
by parting of the line at Cincinnati. Several also went over the dam at Pftts- 
burg, some at Blenerhassett Island, and one at Louisville. During this time, 
however, the coal business had increased until he was selling coal at Cincinnati, 
Louisville and New Orleans. His coal was confi.scated by the Confederate 
government at the outbreak of the war, and he concluded the business was en- 
tirely too hazardous to continue, and closed out his interests. The firm was, 
knovvn as Horn and Robbins, composed of Peter Horn and Joseph Robbins, 
and in connection with their coal business they kept a general store and oper- 
ated a sand works. In 1857 I\Ir. Horn sold out, retired and went west. In 
1859 ^fr. Robbins sold his coal, store and sand interests to Messrs. Kellv and 
Stout. 

In the year of 1847. when the scheme of improving by slack water the- 
Youghiogheny river was taken up, Mr. Robbins became one of its most active 
supporters, and aided in raising the amount required to construct the two dams, 
one at Elrods, and one at Buena \'ista. The company was organized bv nieet- 



46 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

ing at West Newton. Alexander Plummber, president, Moses Robbins, Will- 
iam Larimer, Cyrus ]\larkle and Joseph Robbms were the organizers and first 
directors, and William Day was selected as engineer. He had constructed 
dams for the state on the Kiskiminitas river to feed the canal. The two dams 
to be constructed cost about $100,000, and this was raised by subscription to 
the capital stock of the Youghiogheny Navigation Company. The contract 
was let to William Alston for the first lock at Elrods, and Theodore Swan for 
the one at Buena Vista. These locks provided slack-water navigation from 
McKeesport to West Newton. The contractors encountered great difficulty in 
building the dams — in following the specifications. It required the dams to be 
built of plank and filled in with concrete. It was discovered that the plank 
would not retain the concrete and the dams would not hold water. The com- 
pany had agreed with the coal operators to have the dams finished in 1848. 
The work was not completed until 1849, ^^''d many coal works were opened 
and boats loaded along the river, and after the river was frozen up many of 
the boats were lost. Navigation was opened in September, 1849, '^"d was 
continued until the winter of 1861, when the heavy freeze caused the ice to 
gorge and the tops were taken oiif these dams. A committee was then ap- 
pointed to raise money to repair the Navigation Company's loss, consisting of 
Thomas S. Cass, of the Pennsylvania Railroad, Swan Caldwell and Joseph 
Robbins. They met at the office of Mr. Cass, in Pittsburg. Mr. Cass was 
then acting as president of the Ft. Wayne Railroad, and the matter was turned 
over to his clerk and subsequently to Andrew Carnegie, who was his assistant, 
and these three men raised the money and had the dams repaired and naviga- 
tion resumed. In the winter of 1865-66 the ice was exceedingly heavy. The 
dams were then again badly damaged, and as part of the subscriptions were yet 
unpaid Mr. Robbins was required to make up quite a sum for the repairs al- 
ready done. About June i, 1866, without any apparent cause, the upper dam 
gave way and the result was that the lower dam was broken and the slack- 
water of the Youghiogheny river was gone forever. The washout in the dam 
was a break over twenty feet in width and came without warning, leaving the 
boats which were being loaded along the river at the coal tipples down on the 
bottom of the river, where they remained until broken up and destroyed by the 
floods of the succeeding year. , 

After this Mr. Robbins retired to the farm on which he afterwards lived, 
comprising about three hundred acres of land, which was taken up bv his 
grandfather, Brintnel Robbins. In addition to farming Mr. Robbins was ac- 
tively engaged in other enterprises, being at one time the general manager for 
Thomas Moore of his large mining and distilling interest. He was an organ- 
' izer of the Metropolitan National Bank, at Pittsburg, and is still connected 
with its management. He took an active part in politics as a Republican, and 
served for many years as a school director and delegate at various conventions. 
Pie is an active supporter of the Presbyterian church. His business career was 
very successful, and his interests in coal and other matters were alwavs exten- 
sive. A tract of coal which he owns has been mined by W. L. Scott, and is 
now being mined by the Pittsburg Coal Company. At the present time Mr. 
Robbins is hale and hearty, and takes an active part in business, politics and 
everything about him. 

JOSEPH ROBBINS. The earliest known ancestor of the familv 
of w'hich Joseph Robbins, of North Irwnn, is a representative was Brintnal 
Robbins, a native of Connecticut, and a soldier of the Revolution, his captain 



HISTORY OF IVESTMORELAXD COUXTV. 47 

being Samuel Robbins. His last year in the service saw him an ensign. 
Hezekiah Robbins, his son, lived at Robbins Station, on a farm, the town 
being named after him. He built a frame grist mill at Possum Hollow, near 
Guffev's Station, antl operated it, also cultivating his farm, following these 
two occupations all his life. He built the United Pre.sb\terian church at 
Circleville. now known as the Bethel church, and was made an elder in it. 

Thomas \^'. Robbins, son of Hezekiah Robbins, was born July 12, 1812, 
at Robbins Station, and was a farmer all his life. For many years he served 
as justice of the peace, and in politics was first a Whig, but later a Repub- 
lican. He was a member of the United Presbyterian church. He married, 
June 26, 1838, Sarah P., born February 7, 181 1, daughter of James E. and 
Lydia (Painter) McGrew, of Sewickley township, and their children were: 
Lydia AL, born April 11, 1839, •i^^'i December 17, 1889; Joseph, mentioned 
hereafter; Mary E., born April 10, 1846, died June 17, 1847. Mr. R-obbins 
died February 27, 1873. His widow survived him for a number of years, 
her death occurring January 21, 1892. 

Joseph Robbins, son of Thomas W. and Sarah P. (McCirew) Robbins, 
was born August 10, 1841, on a farm near Coulterville, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania. His education was such as the country schools give and 
was discontinued at the age of fifteen, when he went to vv'ork on the farm. 
August 14, 1862, he enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Fifty-fifth 
Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, Captain A. L. Pearson and Colonel 
E. [. .\llen commanding. He participated in the following battles: Antietam, 
Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Aldie, Gettysburg, \\'apping Heights. Rap- 
pahannock Station, Mine Run, Wilderness, Laurel Hill, Spottsylvania, North 
Anne River, Telopotomy, Bethesda Church, Cold Harbor, Petersburg — as- 
sault, Petersburg — Jerusalem, Plank Road, Petersburg — mine explosion, 
Weldon Railroad and Peebles Farm. This brilliant record came to and end 
at Hatches Run, where he was wounded in the leg, February 6, 1865. For 
a week he was in a hospital at City Point, was then transferred to Baltimore 
for a month, and afterward for a month more to York, Pennsylvania. He 
left the hospital on a twenty-dav furlough home, when this ex]Mred returned 
to York, and was honorably discharged June 2, 1865. He then returned 
to Westmoreland county, near Stewartsville, and in 1900 retired from active 
farming to North Irwin, where he purchased the property on which he now 
resides. He is now serving on the council and school board, and is a Re- 
publican in politics. He is a member of the I'nited Presb\terian church, 
of which he has been an elder seven years. He married, ]\Iarch 26, 1874, 
Mary E., born .April t8, 1857, daughter of William F. and Margaret (Tay- 
lor) Irwin, of Irwin, and their children were: i. Kate Irwin, born I'eb- 
ruary 13, 1875, died January 20. 1895. 2. Sarah Margaret, born Decem- 
ber 15. 1877, is the wife of John Crookston, of North Irwin, and has one 
child. Robert Ray. 3. William Thomas, born .April 25, i88r, married 
^largarct Piper, of North Irwin. 4. Martha Jane, born March 23, 1883. 
5. John Irwin, born January 31, 1887. 6. James Edward, born May 3, 
1890, died August 24, 1890. Mrs. Robbins, tlic mother of these children, 
expired May 26, 1891. 

DR. W. W. JOHNSTON, engaged in the practice of medicine in 
Grecnsburg. was born in Lovalhanna township, \\'estmoreland county, Oc- 
tober 7, 1852. a son of Elrod and Nancy f.Mcorn) Johnston. .At the time 
of his father's death, Elrod Johnston inherited the old family homestead 



48 HISTORY OF WHSTMORELAKD COUXTV. 

upon which he had been born and reared and on which he spent his remain- 
ing days and three of his brothers acquired adjoining farms. His home, 
was the place of entertainment for the traveler and all who came his wav, 
the household being noted for its unlimited hospitality. He followed farm- 
ing throughout his entire life and was highly esteemed in the conununity 
as a reliable business man and worthy citizen. In politics he was a Repub- 
lican and for many years held local office. He belonged to the Loyalhanna 
Baptist church, and died in that faith at the age of eighty-four years. He 
was twice married, his first wife being Nancy Alcorn, by whom he had si.K 
children : Anna, widow of S. A. Wiley, now living with Dr. Johnston ; 
Carilla, w^ife of Walter Shoup of Loyalhanna township; William; Ira, on 
the old homestead; Elrod, of Greensburg; and Nancy, wife of O. J. Closson, 
of Greensburg. His second wife was Elizabeth Wiley and they had one 
son, Harry K., who resides on the old homestead with his brother Ira. 

Dr. Johnston spent his boyhood and youth on his father's farm and in 
the acquirement of his education attended successively the common schools, 
Saltsburg .\cademy and the Indiana Normal school. In 1877 he entered 
upon the study of medicine under the preceptorship of Dr. J. L. Crawford, 
of Saltsburg, and in the fall of 1878 matriculated in Bellevue Hospital Med- 
ical College, of New York, from which he was graduted in the spring of 
1881. He then located for practice in Saltsburg, where for ten vears he 
enjoyed a good patronage and then pursued a post graduate course in New 
York city, subsequent to which time he has practiced in Greensburg, with 
a patronage that is indicative of the public confidence in his skill and ahilit\-. 
He belongs to the Westmoreland County Medical Society and politically 
is a Republican, while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in 
the Presbyterian church. He was married, in 1881, to Mary Ralston, of 
Congruity, Pennsylvania, and they had one child, Lloyd M. Mrs. Johnston 
died in 1888 and in 1891 Dr. Johnston married Mollie Lloyd, of Delmont, 
W'estmoreland county. They have two children, Nancy E. and Ira Ralph. 

JAMES S. MOORHEAD, of Greensburg, is the son of James and 
Jane Elizabeth (Sharpe) Moorhead, of Indiana, Pennsylvania. His ancestors 
were among the first settlers of the present county of Indiana, his great-grand- 
father having been captured by the Indians about 1760, and taken to Quebec, 
where he was exchanged for French prisoners captured by English soldiers 
and colonists. His maternal ancestors were related to the Sharpes in the Cum- 
berland valley of Pennsylvania. 

James S. Moorhead w-as born November 5, 1847, ^n'l was educated at 
Elder's Ridge Academy, and at Washington and Jefiferson College, from which 
last institution he was graduated in 1868. He read law with the firm of 
Steward & Clark, of Indiana, Pennsylvania. Mr. Clark was his cousin and 
afterward became a justice of the supreme court of Pennsylvania. He was 
admitted to the bar in Indiana in 1870, and on June 7 of the same year was ad- 
mitted to the Westmoreland bar and has since been steadily engaged in the 
practice of the law. Like most thorough lawyers, he has never turned aside 
from his chosen profession to seek political preferment, unless it be once in 
1895 when he was a candidate on the Democratic state ticket for judge of the 
superior court of Pennsylvania. Even this place was in the line of his profes- 
sion, and whilst he was defeated, the state going strongly Republican that year , 
his friends had the consolation of knowing that had he been elected he wouhJ 
have brought to the bench a mind eminently qualified for that high position. 
He has, however, served as a school director for twelve years, and the hi^,di 



HISTORY OF U'ESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 49 

standing of the Greensburg schools is in no small measure due to the interest 
he manifested in this line of work. He is a lawyer equally strong either before 
a court or jury, or in giving the counsel essential to the conduct of large busi- 
ness enterprises. He has tried a number of homicide cases, but his work has 
principally been in the more lucrative practice in the civil courts below and the 
supreme court of Pennsylvania. Particularly has he tried many cases in the 
new branch of litigation which has come before the courts of the state in the 
last twenty years growing out of the oil and gas and coal industries. 

In the case of the Westmoreland and Cambria Natural Gas Company vs. 
DeW'itt, et al. (130 Pa. State 235), Air. Moorhead's contention that a lease 
for the purpose of drilling for oil or gas is in the nature of an easement with 
respect to the surface for the puqjose of entry, examination and drilling opera- 
tions and that the real subject of possession by the lessee is the oil or gas ob- 
tained in the land, was denied by the lower court, but was sustained by the 
supreme court of Pennsylvania. Of equal or possibly of greater importance 
from a judicial point of view are the cases of Alilligan vs. Dick, 107 Pa. State 
259; Gumbert's Appeal, no Pa. State 496; Cunningham's Estate, 106 Pa. 
State 536: ruling cases, in all of which Air. Aloorhead was the leading counsel, 
which may be examined by the student or practicing lawyer to advantage. 
Alany others may be cited, but we deem these sufficient for this brief review. 
His address in memory of the late Chief Justice Alercur (Pa. State Rep. 116, p. 
XXV') is an illustration of his style of English. 

Whether his language be spoken or written, whether it be in the form of a 
public address or an argument before a court or a jury, it is always character- 
ized by a finish which is far superior to that of the average lawyer. In every 
forum he advocates his cause' with the honesty of a philosopher, the precision 
of a scholar, and with a dignity becoming the announcement of a judicial man- 
date. There are probably members of the bar in our large cities who surpass 
him in the lines to which they have devoted their special attention, but we 
doubt whether, in the varied attainments of an all-around practitioner, he has 
a superior either on the bench or in the bar of Pennsylvania. Mr. Aloorhead, 
aside from his professional work, has found more time than most lawyers to 
read history, poetry and the higher grade of fiction. It is not infrequent that 
his addresses are adorned by classic references evoked from the ideal world by 
the genius of a poet or the novelist. He is yet in the vigor of his manhood and 
we trust has many years of useful work before him. 

CHARLES H. FOGG, one of the most jjrominent and successful 
civil and mining engineers in Greensburg, is a representative of an old and 
honored family which settled in America in the seventeenth century. The 
founder of the family was Samuel Fogg, who came from Exeter, England, in 
1630, and settled in Hampton. New Hamp.shire. James Fogg, a descendant of 
Samuel Fogg, and the great-grandfather of Charles H. Fogg, was born in 
Scarboro, Maine, in 1771. James Fogg, son of James Fogg, was born in Saco, 
Maine, May 10, 1799. He married Elizalieth P.radbnry, and had children. 
among them being a son, James H. Fogg, lifirn in Saco, Maine, June 10, 1835. 
He is a prosperous man of business, dealing in stock and lumber. He married 
Lydia A. Haley, daughter of Mark Haley, and among their children was 
Charles H., of whom later. 

Charles H. Fogg, son of James H. and Lydia A. (Haley) Fogg, was born 
in P)iddeford, Alaine, February 7, 1861. He had the advantage of a most ex- 



50 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

cellent education, attending the University of Maine, where he was graduated 
as a civil engineer in June, 1881. He came to Greensburg in September, 1882, 
having accepted a position as assistant civil engineer in the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Company, and held this position for several years. He then formed a 
business partnership with W. W. Jamison, under the firm name of Jamison & 
Fogg, in general civil and mining- engineering. This partnership was dis- 
solved in 1903, and Mr. Fogg continued in the same branch of business alone, 
and worked up a very lucrative business. Later he associated himself with 
Morris L. Painter, and they are doing business under the style of Painter & 
Fogg. Mr. Fogg is very enterprising, energetic, and possessed of great de- 
terniination. He is very systematic and accurate in his work, and has the 
reputation of being one of the most reliable men in his profession. He married, 
December 27, 1887, Rebecca Barclay, daughter of Thomas J. Barclay, and they 
have six children: Hester B., James Henry, Sarah B., Joseph B., Rebecca B., 
Lydia Ann. 

RE\'. PHILIP KRETZ, pastor of the Most Holy Sacrament church, 
at Greensburg, was born in Erie, Pennsylvania, March 11, 1857, son of Wende- 
lin and Mary (Volz) Kretz. When twelve years of age he entered St. Vin- 
cent's College, in Westmoreland county, where he acquired his education, and 
on July 15, 1880, was ordained to the priesthood. In October of the same year 
he "was sent to Rome to study the higher branches of theology, and upon his 
return was made a member of the faculty in St. Vincent's College, where for 
five years thereafter lie taught theology. He was given, in 1889, a charge at St. 
MarVs church, in Elk county, Pennsylvania, where he remained for five or 
six years. He was then sent to a mission in the Alleghanies, having charge of 
St. Boniface and St. Lawrence congregations. He was sent to Baltimore in 
1895, where he had charge of Fourteen Holy Martyrs church, and in September, 
1899, he was transferred to Greensburg to take charge of the Most Holy Sacra- 
ment church. This was the first Catholic property west of the Alleghanies, 
having been purchased by the church in 1789. After coming to Greensburg, 
Father Kretz saw the necessity of having a more commodious school building, 
and in July, 1904, the erection of the present structure, one of the most sub- 
stantial buildings of Greensburg, was began and was ready for occupancy 
March i, 1905. The building is supplied with all modern ventilating appli- 
ances and the various modern improvements found in the schools of the present 
and is a handsome and substantial structure. Father Kretz died August, 1905. 

ALBERT CHARLES SNIVELY, an attorney of Greensburg, was 
born in ]\Iount Pleasant township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, No- 
vember 29, 1869. 

(I) John Snively, the great-grandfather, came from Germany to Hagers- 
town, Maryland, in 1780, when but a mere boy. His parents were of the 
Lutheran faith. He died in 1806. Pie married Amy Wilkinson and they had 
three sons : John, Abraham, Hugh. The last two removed to Pittsburg and 
Ohio, respectively. 

dl) John Snively, the eldest son of John (i). was the grandfather of 
Albert Charles Snively. He was born in Hagerstown, Maryland, 1803, and 
came to Mount Pleasant township in 1807. He, too, was a Lutheran : he had 
a fair common school education. The date of his death was 1888. He mar- 
ried Catherine Fausold, born in Cumberland, Maryland, 1800, and came to 
Westmoreland county in 1818. They were married in 1824. She died in 
1877. Of the ten children born to her only two now survive. 



THE 

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HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 51 

(III) Hiram Snively. the father of Albert Charles, was born in ^^lount 
Pleasant township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, February 4, 1834. 
He possessed a good common school education ; is a Democrat, and has held 
manv township offices. He was assessor live terms and tax collector twice. 
During the dark days of the Civil war period, he was rejected from service on 
account of his physical disability. He married Mary Ann Chorpenning, Sep- 
.tember 16, 1858. She was the daughter of David and Hester (Benford) 
Chorpenning. Her father was born in Somerset county in ,1799 and died in 
1868. Her mother was also a native of Somerset countv, born 1807 and died 
1867. 

( I\') Albert Charles Snively was educated in the puljlic schools of ]\Iount 
Pleasant township, the Blount Pleasant Institute and Greensburg Seminary. 
He began teaching in the public schools of Westmoreland county in 1888, fol- 
lowing it for eight terms. He studied law with Albert H. Bell and G. Dallas 
Albert. He was admitted to the bar of Westmoreland county, January 26, 
1896, and has practiced his chosen profession ever since. He is a supporter of 
the Democratic party, has been tax collector, and is at present school director in 
Irwin borough ; treasurer of the Irwin Realty Company, and secretary of the 
Sunset Distilling Company. In church connections he is a member of the 
}iIethodist Episcopal church. He is a member of the Masonic Order, Mason- 
town (Pennsylvania) Lodge, No. 459; K. of P. Lodge, No. 415, Irwin; B. P. 
O. E. Lodge, No. 486, Jeannette. For three years he was a member of the Na- 
tional Guard of Pennsylvania, in Company I, serving in 1894-95-96. He 
married. July 28, 1903, in \\'estmoreland county, Pennsylvania, Nettie A. 
Christner. of Mount Pleasant. Mrs. Snively was educated in the public 
schools and at the Normal. Her parents are Rev. A. Dickey and Samantha 
(Pyle) Christner. To I\Ir. and jVIrs. Snively have been born one child, Al- 
"berta Christner, born February 17, 1905, at Irwin, Pennsylvania. ^ 

DANIEL A. MOWRY is the oldest representative of the fourth gen- .^.jtlfi^j* 
eration of the !\Iowry familv in Derry township, AVestmoreland countv. The -^ 
family is of Swiss lineage and was established in America by the great-great- ^ 

grandfather, who emigrated from Switzerland and settled in Dauphin county, ' ^^ 
Pennsylvania, about the time of the outbreak of the Revolutionary war. His °f "^ 
son. Michael Mowry, removed from Dauphin to Westmoreland county, and ac- 
quired a large tract of land in Derry township, from the heirs of Major W'ilson. 
This tract has in subsequent years been divided and subdivided and now a por- 
tion is in possession of Daniel A. l\Iowry. The original homestead is now 
owned by ex-Governor John Latta, of Greensburg. Michael Mowry and his 
wife died at the age of seventy-two years. Their two children, Conrad and 
Catherine, were born in Dauphin county. 

Conrad Mowry w^as reared upon the home farm in Derry township, learned 
the weaver's trade and followed that vocation during the active years of his life. 
He continued to reside, however, upon a portion of the old MowTy home- 
stead, which had come to him as his patrimony. He and his wife JNIatilda 
lived to the age of seventy-two years, it being a coincidence that the paternal 
grandparents and great-grandparents all died at the same age. Conrad and 
Matilda Mowry also had two children : John and Nancy, the latter the wife of 
Alichacl Shehan. 

John Mowry. born at the ancestral home in Derry township, December 24. 
1809. learned the cooper's trade in early life and followed that pursuit until 
about 1856. when he entered tlie employ of the Pennsvlvania Railroad Com- 



HISTORY OF U'ESTMORELAXD COUNTY. 



pany and was thus engaged until his retirement from active husiness hfe. He, 
too, made his home upon the farm where he was born and reared. He held 
membership in the Lutheran church, in which members of the family have been 
active workers for more than a century, many of them holding office in the 
church. The political faith of the family has ever been in accord with Demo- 
cratic principles, and John JMowry also followed in the path of his ancestors in 
this particular. He died Decemljer i8, 1883. In early manhood he married 
^lary A. Crusan, who was of Scotch descent, the emigrant ancestor having 
come to Westmoreland county more than a hundred years ago. John and Alary 
A. Mowry had nine children, of whom three are living: Daniel A.; Michael 
Y., of Derry township ; and Nancy R., the wife of Samuel A. Wareham, of the 
borough of Derry. 

Daniel A. Mowry was born in Derry township, Westmoreland county, 
June 13, 1847, was reared upon the home farm and educated in school No. 15, 
of his native township. From the age of ten years he was earning money in 
various ways and when seventeen years of age his name was on the pay roll 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, while at the age of nineteen years he 
entered upon an apprenticeship to the blacksmith's trade in the town of New 
Derry. \\'hen he had completed his term of indenture he opened a shop in 
iMillwood, which he conducted nine years, doing a large amount of railroad 
work. In 1878 he re-entered the service of the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany in the capacity of a blacksmith for car inspectors in the motive power de- 
l^artment, and in 1888 he was placed in charge of the company's store at Derry 
Station, where he remained until his election to the office of county commis- 
sioner in 1902. He was six times a nominee for county offices, having been 
nominated five times for the position of prothonotary. While the Republicans 
normally have a very large majority, he was defeated on one occasion by only 
a hundred and fifty votes and he was elected to his present office by a very large 
majority, which is indicative of his personal popularity and the confidence re- 
posed in him by his fellow townsmen. He has always been a staunch Demo- 
crat and an earnest worker for the growth and success of the party. He is now 
serving as secretary of the board of county commissioners. For thirty-two 
years he has been a member of the A. O. of U. W. and for more than thirty 
years of Lamont Lodge, No. 568, A. F. and A. M. He is a member of the 
Veteran Employers Association of the Pittsburg division of the Pennsylvania 
railroad, and has been a life long member of Trinity Lutheran church, at Derry, 
serving as a member of the church council and secretary of the board. Mr. 
Mowry was married June 14, 1869, to Margaret A. Akins, of Derry township, 
a daughter of Andrew Akins. They have become the parents of eleven children, 
of whom nine are living: Maud E., the wife of L. A. Loughner, of Penn town- 
ship, Westmoreland county ; Mary M., wife of W. P. Best, of Derry Station ; 
Albert T., of Derry township, foreman in the machine shops at Conemaugh. 
Pa. ; Andrew J., of Derry township, who is with the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company; Daniel A., an engine preparer at Derry; Myrtle F., wife of L. S. 
Kelly, of Derry township; Charles C, Bertha L. and Charlotte J., at home. 

AMOS B. KLINE. The Kline family has long been prominent in 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. The first of the name to settle here was 
John Kline, a pioneer, who came from the eastern part of this state shortly after 
the Revolutionary war. He was a son of Peter Kline, a resident of Lancaster 
county, Pennsxlvania, in the part which is now Lebanon county, but whether 
he was a native born or an emigrant from Germanv is not known. 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAXD COUNTY. 53 

Peter Kline enlisted as a private in the Revolutionary war, was present at 
Valley Forge under the command of General Washington, and afterward was 
assigned to the commissary department and placed in charge of foraging parties. 
ShoVtlv after the cessation of hostilities he married a Miss Mace, and for sev- 
eral vears devoted his time and attention to farming. Accompanied by his wife 
and family, 2\Ir. Kline migrated westward and located in the vicinity of Grape- 
ville, the journev being made on horseback. He made frequent trips to Phila- 
delphia to examine titles, as he was a conveyancer as well as a farmer. He 
never returned from his last trip to the city, and was never thereafter heard 
of bv his family. Their children were: i. John, settled in the vicinity of 
Adamsburg, but after his marriage to Nancy Buchman, of Hagerstown, Mary- 
land, he purchased property in the jNIanor of Denmark where he thereafter re- 
sided. He reared a large family, among whom was a son John, of whom later. 
2. William, also settled in the vicinity of Adamsburg. 3. George, deceased. 4. 
Samuel, went to the southwest and was never again heard from by his friends. 
5. Pollv. married Peter Kemmerer. and located in Illinois. 6. Catherine, mar- 
ried Daniel Kemmerer, and settled in Iowa. 

John Kline, son of John and Nancy (Buchman ) Kline, settled on the farin 
known under William "Penn's patent as Landsdown, in the Denmark Manor 
district of Penn township. He was energetic, industrious and progressive. He 
was a prosperous farmer, and also owned and operated the Bou(|uet mills for 
several" years. He married Elizabeth Knappenberger, daughter of John and 
Hannah' Knappenberger, an old and early settled family in the Manor district. 
Their children were: Hezekiah J., died in McDonough county, Illinois, in 1869: 
Hannah, died in 1882; William J., A. M., M. D.. a practicing physician of 
Greensburg since 1871 ; he was a member of the state legislature in 1877-8, and 
a member of the state board of medical examiners at a later date : Nicholas L., 
a dentist, now located at Scottdale. ]\Iary Ann, married David L. Snyder; 
Henry, enlisted in the union army and died at Newbern, North Carolina, in 
1863, aged twenty-one years ; Lydia E., married Cyrus J. Snyder ; Amos B., 
mentioned hereafter: Rev. Alpha K., a graduate of Franklin and Marshall Col- 
lege, and now (1905) a minister in the Reformed church; Jacob, died in in- 
fancy. John Kline, father of these children, died in December, 1855, aged forty- 
six years. His wife, who was an energetic and intelligent woman, possessing 
rare tact, good judgment and christian virtues, died }ilarch 11, 1890. in the 
eighty-seventh year of her age. 

Amos B. Kline, son of John and Elizabeth (Knappenberger) Kline, was 
born near the historic village of Bouquet, Penn township, Westmoreland county, 
Pennsvlvania, April 19. 1843. He received a liberal education in the common 
schools and academies of his native county. In September, 1862, he volunteered 
his services in defense of his country, becoming a member of Company C, 
Twenty-second Regiment, Pennsylvania Militia, which saw several weeks of 
service on the southern borders of the state. He served in the capacity of 
teacher in the public schools for several terms, discharging his duties in a highly 
creditable manner. During the years 1865 and 1866 he was superintendent of 
the Curlew and Highland Oil Companies, two organizations operating: at Burn- 
ing Springs, West Mrginia. In order to further qualify himself for a business 
career he entered Eastman's Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York, from 
which he was graduated in the spring of 1867. He then embarked in the drug 
and grocery business at Irwin, but two years later disposed of the same and 
accepted a position as assistant superintendent and bookkeeper with John S. 
Love, of Pittsburg, who was then constructing the railroad from Hollidaysburg, 



54 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

Jjlair county. In October, 1873, he became a partner with his brother, Dr. 
VV. J. K. Kline, in the pubhcation of the IV cslmorcland Democrat and Repub- 
lican. They enlarged the paper, changed the name to the IVestmorcland Dem- 
ocrat, and made it a live and important weekly, taking a leading part in poli- 
tics and ably discussing the issues of the day. Mr. Kline took part in the edi- 
torial work, and was general manager until the fall of 1882, when they sold the 
paper. They then purchased a large coal field in the vicinity of i'leasant Unity, 
which they subsequently sold to Williant Thaw, of Pittsburg. They afterwards 
purchased three thousand acres of gas coal lands in Manor Valley, antl were in- 
strumental in the building of the Manor Valley railroad, and promoting the 
Manor Gas Coal Company, in which they held an interest until 1886, since 
which time Mr. Kline has been dealing in real estate in Westmoreland and A\- 
legheny counties. During the year 1889 Mr. Kline and his brother. Dr. Kline, 
purchased several tracts of land and laid out West Wilmerding, an addition to 
Wilmerding, Alleghenv county, on the line of the Pennsylvania railroad. Mr. 
Kline is an active member of the Reformed church, and during the years 1888 
and 1889 contributed liberally of his time (serving as chairman of the building 
committee) and means in the erection of the new church edifice known as Den- 
mark Manor Reformed church, which ranks among the most handsome country 
churches in western Pennsylvania. He is firm in his allegiance to the principles 
of the Democratic party. He married, September 17, 1889, Elizabeth B. Kays, 
daughter of D. L. Kays, of Pittsburg. Their children are : Elizabeth, Madeline 
and Arthur Purnadotte. 

CHARLES F. EHALT, the genial and well known proprietor of 
Hotel Ehalt, at Greensburg, formerly known as the Station House, and Union 
Hotel, is a native of the tovv-n in which he now resides, born December 31, 1858,^ 
to Jacob and Lydia (Coshey) Ehalt, whose family consisted of seven children: 
Sybilla E., Mary E., Alice M., Annie E., Gertrude T., Jacob E., and Charles 
F. Jacob Ehalt (father) was born in Wurtemberg, Bavaria, July 8, 1821, and 
his wife, who was a daughter of Samuel Coshey, was a native of Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania. In 185 1 Jacob Ehallt built the hotel known as the Sta- 
tion House, on the present site of the hotel conducted by his son Charles F., and 
during the years 1869-70 completely remodeled the same. Being a man of the 
strictest integrity and unimpeachable character, he was never refused a license 
by the court. He was a staunch Democrat, and a member of the Catholic 
church, as was also his wife. His death ocurred October 8, 1885. 

Charles F. Ehalt was educated in the public schools of Greensburg and 
St. Vincent College, at Latrobe, where he completed his studies at the age of 
sixteen. He succeeded his father in the hotel business, and in 1888 remodeled 
the structure and built an extensive addition thereto. Being brought up in this 
line of work he is thoroughly familiar with all the details of management, and 
therefore a large degree of success has attended his well directed efforts. He 
and his family reside in a private house adjoining the hotel, but entirely sep- 
arate from it. Mr. Ehalt is a member of the Catholic church, and since attain- 
ing young manhood has cast his vote with the Democratic ticket. He has always 
taken an active part in local politics, and has served seven years as a member of 
the city council to the satisfaction of his constitutents. He was one of the organ- 
izers, and is now a director in the Merchants' Trust Company, a well and favor- 
ably known banking institution of Greensburg. Mr. Ehalt married, October 
2, 1888, Mary J. Ruffner, of Derry township, a daughter of James and Elizabeth 



HISTORY OF Jl'ESTMORELAND COUNTY. 55 

Ruffner. Their children are Helen R., born July 8,, 1890; Edgar, October 15, 
1891 ; Mary J., April 23, 1893 ; Jane P., Uctober 2j, 1894; Sybilla E., September 
II, 1898; and Charles F., Jr., June 20, 1900. 

WlLLIAAI DONALDSON, burgess of South Greensburg, West- 
moreland county, is a man who throughout his active career has exhibited clear- 
ness of perception and soundness of judgment, and has always enjoyed an en- 
viable reputation for moral worth and integrity of character. He possesses true 
public spirit and uses his influence to enhance the best interests of the city, 
supporting all worthy enterprises. He was born in Brooks county, West Vir- 
ginia, November 7, 1854, a son of William and Elizabeth F. (Charlton) Don- 
aldson, who emigrated from New Castle on the Tyne, Northumberland county, 
England, in 1849, settling in East Elizabeth, AUcgeheny county, Pennsylvania, 
where he followed his trade of miner. 

William Donaldson acquired a good English education in the common 
schools, and after completing the same pursued a course of study at the Scran- 
ton Alining School. He became a practical miner, was thorough and conscien- 
tious in the performance of his duties, and his perseverance and integrity was 
crowned with the success merited by those who steadily pursue their way 
through life. He was elected on the Democratic ticket to the office of burgess 
of South Greensburg, in which capacity he is now serving. He is a member 
of Knights of Pythias, and Covenant Lodge, No. 259, of Penn Station, West- 
moreland county. I\Ir. Donaldson married February 17, 1876, Mary Altman, 
born October 22, i860, in Westmoreland city, a daughter of Eli and Margaret 
(Seigfriet) Altman. Their children are as follows: James E., born September 
26, 1879, married ^lary A. Lauffer, and resides in Greensburg: ]\Iary E., born 
August 14, 1882, became the wife of Richard ;\Icllon Murdock, and resides in 
South Greensburg; Henry C, born June 9, 1887; Priscilla J., born March 8, 
1889; and Margaret S., born October 22, 1892. 

AMOS K. HUTCHINSON. Greensburg possesses in Amos K. 
Hutchinson a public-spirited citizen. His paternal grandfather came from Ire- 
land, while his grandfather on his mother's side was a native of Germany. He 
is a son of Joshua and Susan ( King) Hutchinson, and was born September 30, 
1858, in Greensburg, Pa. 

Amos K. Hutchinson attended the common schools of Greensburg. At the 
age of thirteen he obtained emploxment on the Pennsylvania railroad, at the 
same time attending school during two winters. He continued to work for this 
railroad until he was within three months of his majority. In March, 1903, he 
was elected chief of police, and was re-elected in 1904-05-06, his administra- 
tion of the duties of the office proving in the highest degree satisfactory to all 
concerned. He has also given evidence of his zeal in the public service by be- 
coming a member of the volunteer fire department. No. 3. He belongs to the 
Eagles, No. 723, and Woodmen of the World, No. 18. of Westmoreland 
county. Mr. Hutchinson married, June 3, 1880; Elizabeth, daughter of George 
and Susan Rohrbacher, and their children were : Carrie S., John C, George E., 
Walter J., Samuel L., deceased ; and Clarence M. Mr. Hutchinson and his 
children sustained a severe bereavement in the death of the wife and mother. 
who passed away November 14, 1902. 

JOHN H. KING. The family of which John H. King, of 
Greensburg. is a rcjirescntative, is one which has long been resident in this 
country. His great-grandfather was a native of the United States and was the 



56 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

father of John King, who was born in Somerset county where he followed the 
calling of a farmer. His political influence was given to the Whigs, and he was 
a prominent member of the IMethodist Episcopal church. He married Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Michael Nof¥, a Somerset county farmer of German descent, 
and they were the parents of a daughter and two sons, one of whom, David J., 
is mentioned hereafter. Mr. King died in 1839. 

David J. King, son of John and Elizabeth ( Noff ) King, was born No- 
vember 6, 1820, at Confluence, Somerset county, where he was educated in the 
subscription schools. At the age of eighteen he went to Westmoreland county 
and settled near Mount Pleasant. He devoted himself to agricultural pursuits, 
and was active as a citizen, filling the offices of tax collector, assessor and school 
director. Until 1863 he was a Repulilican, laut in that year joined the Demo- 
cratic party to which he adhered during the remainder of his life. He was a 
deacon in the Presbyterian church. He married Mary Ann Simpson whose 
great-grandfather, Thomas Simpson, came from Holland in 1736 and settled in 
Indianatown, Indiana county. About 1775 he moved to Westmoreland counfy, 
where, in 1780, he built a house near Mount Pleasant which is still standing and 
has always remained in the possession of the family. He served in the Contin- 
ental army during the Revolutionary war, and his son, William Simpson, was 
the father of a daughter, ^lary Ann, who was born in 1823, near Mount 
Pleasant, and became the wife of David J- King, as mentioned above. The fam- 
ily is closely related to that of General Ulysses S. Grant. The following chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. David J. King: Rebecca, married David 
I\Iusic ; William S. ; John H., of whom later ; David Blennett ; Fannie, married 
Joseph W. Stoner ; Theodore ; Theophilus ; Byron W. : Frank A. ; and Mary- 
etta. Mr. King died in Westmoreland coimty in 1893, and his wife, Mary A., 
died Augu.st 7, 1905, aged eighty-two years. 

John H. King, son of David J. and Mary .\nn (Sim])son) King, was born 
December 29, 1849, in Mount Pleasant, where he received his preparatory edu- 
cation in the public schools, afterward entering Duff College, Pittsburg. On 
completing his education he devoted himself for four years to the profession 
of teaching, and then engaged in mercantile business at New Stanton. At the 
end of eight years he sold his store and became manager of a large flouring mill, 
a position which he retained for ten years, and was then forced to resign on 
aLCOunt of his health. He moved to Greensburg where he has since been en- 
gaged in business as a general contractor. He was chosen in 1903, to fill the 
office of tax collector. He belongs to the R. A., and the K. M. His political 
views and principles are those of the Republican party, and he is a member of 
the German Reformed church. He married, in 1878, Lizzie M., born March i, 
1849, in West Overton, Westmoreland county, daughter of Frederick S. and 
Sally (Ingals) Hunker, and their children were: Harry Earl, born March i, 
1885 ; died March 9, 1885 : and Charles F.. born April 2, 1889. 

ROMAYNE M. WALDRON, D. V. S. Few members of the veter- 
inary profession are better known in western Pennsylvania than is Dr. Waldron, 
who is engaged in the'practice of his profession in Greensburg, Westmoreland 
county, where he also conducts one of the largest sales and exchange stables in 
this portion of the state. Educated in all the principles and modern methocis 
of his profession, he is enthusiastic in its practice and his services are valued 
highly, being in constant demand in Westmoreland and adjoining counties. 

Dr. Waldron claims the fair Emerald Isle as the place of his nativity, hav- 
ing been bom in county Roscommon, Ireland, August 7, 1859, and having there 



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HISTORY or U'ESTMORELAXD COUNTY. 57 

been reared to maturity, while he secured excellent educational advantages in 
the schools of his native county. He is a son of Michael and Catharine (Ro- 
inayne) W'aldron, who were likewise born and reared in Ireland, and who are 
now deceased, the father having been a farmer and stockman by vocation. In 
1879, when nineteen years of age. Dr. Waldron came to America, and here he 
took up tlie study of the veterinary science, finally entering the celebrated To- 
ronto \'eterinary College, in the city of Toronto, Canada, where he was gradu- 
ated as a member of the class of 1887, receiving his degree of Doctor of Veter- 
inary Surgery. He has made a thorough and systematic study of veterinary 
science. The sacrifice and suffering entailed upon the domestic animals which 
minister to our well-being and pleasure, on account of the ignorance prevailing 
as to their treatment, awakened in Dr. Waldron an overmastering desire to learn 
how to cure and alleviate their sufferings, and the result has been his successful 
and noteworthy career as an able and enthusiastic member of his profession, in 
which he has attained high prestige. Soon after his graduation Dr. Waldron 
located in Greensburg, and here he has built up a large and important business 
in the direct line of his profession, while in the connection he established an 
exchange stable, in which department of his business he has expanded the en- 
terprise until it is one of the largest and most important in western Pennsvl- 
vania, the number of horses and mules handled averaging from one hundred 
to one hundred and fifty head per month, while through this source he supplies 
the greater amount of such stock utilized in the mines of this section of the 
state. Dr. Waldron is not the only representative of his family in the United 
States, as is evident when we note that his three brothers are well established in 
their respective lines of endeavor, as follows : Dr. Lewis P., is a successful phy- 
sician and surgeon of Akron, Ohio; Thomas A. is a veterinary surgeon of 
Uniontown, Pennsylvania; and Michael is a prosperous farmer residing near 
Brownsville, Fayette county, this state. In politics Dr. Waldron gives an un- 
compromising allegiance to the Republican party, and he is one of the active 
workers in its local ranks, while he is essentially progressive and public-spirited 
as a citizen, though he has never sought the honors or emoluments of public 
office. He is a member of the Catholic church. 

As a leading member of his profession in this locality Dr. Waldron is con- 
sidered an authority and is frequently called in consultation over serious or 
complex cases, few ever passing through his skilled treatment without relief. 
He is a member of various professional organizations, is held in high esteem 
by his professional confreres, and is a frequent contributor to veterinary pub- 
lications. He is well and favorably known in his home city, and is a reliable 
and progressive business man and loyal citizen. Dr. Waldron married, Jan- 
uary 31, 1889, Elizabeth Lutz, born and reared in Westmoreland county," be- 
ing a daughter of Dr. David Lutz, one of the representative dental surgeons of 
Fayette City, where he is stil! engaged in the practice of his profession. Dr. and 
.Mrs. Waldron have six children, namelv : Louis David, Romayne M., Jr., Cath- 
erine A., Edith E., Josephine E., and Mary L. 

JOHN RICHEY HAYDEX. Among the retired citizens of the 
borough of Greensburg, Pennsylvania, no man stands higher in the estimation 
of his life long neighbors than John R. Hayden, who descended through the 
following erenealogy : 

(I) Ebenezer Hayden, the grandfather, was of Scotch-Irish parentage. 
The family settled in New Jersey and came to Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1774. Mr. Hayden was a man of exceptional cpialifications. Tic 



58 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

was born in New Jersey, and came to this county in 1774, locating- on the 
Yough river, known as I5udd's Ferry, where he conducted a ferry business for 
eigliteen or twenty years. He built large boats for the conveyance of cattle 
across the river, as that became a leading point for the crossing of large droves 
of cattle en route to the eastern markets. In this he had many interesting 
experiences and narrow escapes. Often the entire load of cattle would be 
capsized in the river, and then the scramble for safety begun, Mr. Havden 
often climbing upon the back of some wild steer and riding in safety to land. 
]\lr. Hayden also followed the various vocations of shoemaking, blacksmithing 
and carpentering, and was recognized as a competent physician and surgeon, 
although never having taken a medical or surgical course. He was self- 
taught in this latter profession, and his practice extended over a wide terri- 
tory of this and adjoining counties. He was a great reader, and deep thinker 
of more than average intellect. Politically he was a strong Democrat, and in 
religion was a member of the Baptist church. He married a Miss O'Brien, 
and their children were : John, William, of whom later, and a daughter who 
died in childhood. Mr. Hayden died at the age of eighty-nine years. 

(II) William Hayden, son of Ebenezer Hayden (I), was born at Budds 
Ferry, in 1806, and died in 1892. The early part of his life was spent at lirick 
making, but subsequently followed fanning. He married, in 1839, Jii'iann 
Wiley, daughter of .Sampson Wiley and wife. They were the parents of six 
children, all deceased now, but two — John Richey and Mrs. Jessee S. Wall. 
The names of the children in this family are : Agnes, Catherine, Brinton, John 
R., William, Hannah Jane. The mother was born in 1819 and died 1882. 
Among the important historic events recounted with great pleasure by the 
family, and with which William Hayden participated, was the reception given 
to General Lafayette on his return visit in 1825. It was tendered him inRos- 
traver township, this county, at the old Rolioboth Church. Mr. Hayden 
received a good common school education ; was politically a stanch Democrat 
and a hearty supporter of Jackson, both in the campaign of 1828 and 1832. 
On the maternal side the grandfather, Sampson Wiley, came from Ireland in 
1795 and married Anna McGrew. Their children were : William, Sampson, 
Joseph, James, Nathan, Mary, Elizabeth, Nancy, Juliann and Hannah. 

(III) John R. Hayden, the fourth child of W'illiam and Juliann (Wiley) 
Hayden (2), born March 2, 1846, in Sewickley township, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, received his education both at the common and ]irivate 

, schools of his native county. His active career was commenced as a farmer 
and brick manufacturer, but later he became a coal operator, which branch of 
business he followed from 1882 to 1892. During the last named year he was 
elected poor director of Westmoreland county and succeeded himself, holding 
the office five terms or ten years, which record has never been made in the 
county before. It was in 1903 that he removed to the fifth ward in the borough 
of Greensburg, where he erected one and purchased two good residences on 
Alexander street. The principal business with which he is connected at this 
time, is that of a large foundry at Hunkert, he being the president of the 
Greensburg Wheel and Supply' Company. Mr. Havden's life has been an 
exemplary one in all respects. He is a memlier of the First Presbyterian 
Church of Greensburg, belongs to the Masonic fraternity, and is advanced to 
the high degree of Knights Templarship. Politically he' is a supporter of the 
Democratic partv. 

John R. Hayden married, in 1868, near Irwin, Pennsylvania, Sarah Jane 
Byerly, daughter of William Findlay and Margaret Ann (Rankard) Bverlv. 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 59 

The .Byerlys are farmers, r^lrs. Ha_\den was born Xovember 22. 1846, am! 
received a good education in the pubHc school and also had the advantage of 
private instructions under Dr. Andrew Byerly, her uncle, who at present is 
professor of Latin and Greek, and vice-principal of the J\Iillersville (Pennsyl- 
vania) State Normal school. Her father was an elder in the Presbyterian 
church for fifty years in succession ; he died in 1904. His wife, the companion 
of a long married life, died October, 1901, and they were buried in L'nion 
cemeterv at Irwin, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Airs. Hayden are the parents of 
children: i. Frank W., born October 11, 1869, married Ella Weddell, and 
thev have two daughters — Alildred and Gertrude. 2. Harry E., born March 
31,' 1872, died August 5, 1897. 3. William Findlay, born July 14, 1874, 
married, October 21, 1899, at Irwin, Pennsylvania, Margaret, daughter of 
Mr. and Airs. Joseph B. Alartin ; they have one daughter, Elizabeth Jane, Ijorn 
October 18, 1900. 4. John B., born January 5, 1877, married in 1898 Lydia 
Baer, and they have a son, Clarence Hayden; 5 Cyrus H., and 6. Margaret 
B. (twins) born 1881. Cyrus H. married, in 1900, Mary Wingert, and they 
have one daughter, Louisa. Margaret married, in 1900, William K. Mayers, 
and they are the parents of three children living: Margaurite, John Kirk and 
William Russell. One child died in infancy. 

GEORGE W. GOOD, a representative business man of Westmore- 
land county, Pennsylvania, well known as a contractor and promoter, is a de- 
scendant by both paternal and maternal lines from pioneer stock of this section 
of the "Keystone" state. He traces his descent on both sides to both German 
and Swiss ancestors. 

George W. Good, son of Henry Good, was born in Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1849, received his education there, and lived in Plarrison City, 
until 1873, when he removed with his family to Greensburg, same county. Here 
he was engaged in the musical instrument business until 1880, when he removed 
with his familv to Altoona, Pennsylvania, and continued this business for a time. 
About 1886 he returned to Greensburg and engaged in the general contracting 
business, in which he made a remarkably successful record. His first contract 
of importance was the construction of the Greensburg, Jeannette and Pittsburg 
trolley line, and was one of the promoters and builders of the Greensburg and 
Southern trolley line. He also executed large contracts for street paving in 
Greensburg, and many others of a public or semi-public nature. Among the 
important buildings in the city which he erected are the following: The court 
house, in 1891, which he erected in the remarkably short time of forty-seven 
days ; John W. Pollin's store building ; St. Clair Opera House ; Star brewery ; 
parochial school ; Westmoreland Grocerv Company's building, and many others. 
He was always ready to promote anything that promised for the welfare and 
improvement of the city, and allowed no opportunity to pass to further its inter- 
ests. He was a man of sound business judgment and keen discernment, and had 
won the respect and confidence of all who knew him. He was a member and dea- 
con of the Reformed church. He was also a member of the following organi- 
zations: Greensburg Lodge, No. 518, F. and A. M. ; Urania Chapter,No. 192; 
Kedron Commandery, No. 18, K. T. He died January 6, 1905, regretted by a 
large circle of friends. He was one of the leading business men of Greensburg, 
and commanded unalloyed confidence and regard in his native county. He 
married Maria Lenhart, a native of Westmoreland comity, daughter of Michael 
Lenhart. whose ancestors were among the early settlers in Westmoreland county, 
and had three children : Minnie, married Curtis PI. Greeg, an attorney of 



6o HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

Greensburg; Lavinia, wife of P. W". Hudson, secretary of the Opera House 
Company, Greensburg, Pennsylvania ; Frank, of whom later. 

Frank Good, only son of George W. and Maria (Lenhart) Good, was born 
in Harrison City, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, February 6, 1872. Al- 
most his entire life hitherto has been spent in Greensburg. It was there he re- 
ceived his early education in the public schools, later entering the high school and 
graduating as a member of the class of 1889. He then entered the Westmore- 
land and Jefferson College, where he remained as a student for two years, but 
did not complete the entire course. Withdrawing- from this institution he re- 
turned to Greensburg, where he commenced the practical study of law under 
the preceptorship and in the office of Curtis H. Greeg, one of the leading mem- 
bers of the bar in W'estmoreland county, and continued these studies under this 
able tuition and guidance until he was eligible for admission to the bar, which 
occurred in April, 1895. Since that time he has been engaged in the practice 
of his profession in Greensburg, though other interests demand a good portion 
of his time and attention. He became associated in business with his father 
under the firm name of Good & Company. He is at the present time ( 1906) 
president of the St. Clair Opera House Company, a very flourishing institution. 
His political proclivities are Democratic, and he is a member of the Reformed 
church. He is associated fraternally with the following organizations: West- 
moreland Lodge, No. 518, A. F. and A. M. ; Urania Chapter, No. 192, R. A. M. ; 
Kedron Commandery, No. 16, K. T. ; Lodge No. 511, B. P. O. E. Mr. Good 
married, C)ctober 16, 1902, Viola Frantz, of New Rochelle, New York, daugh- 
ter of Jacob F. Frantz, president of the Twentieth Century Dental Company, a 
large concern in the city of New York. Mr. and Mrs. Good have two children: 
Gertrude, born January i, 1904; George, June 15, 1905. 

JOHN F. MITINGER. Among the old and honored families of 
\\'estmoreland county, Pennsylvania, noted for their honor and integrity of 
character, mav be mentioned the ]\litinger family, descendants of a German 
ancestry. 

Samuel Mitinger, father of John F. Mitinger, and founder of the West- 
moreland county branch of the family, was born in one of the New England 
states, where he was reared and educated. During young manhood he came 
to Pennsylvania and located in East Huntingdon township. Westmoreland 
county, near the present city of Greensburg, where he identified himself with 
agricultural pursuits, which he continued until his decease, which occurred in 
the year 1867. He was one of the prominent farmers and dairymen of the 
county, and was the pioneer in the establishment of a milk route with wagon de- 
livery in the city of Greensburg. He was a consistent member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and at the time of his demise was an advocate of the prin- 
ciples of the Republican party. He married Catherine Poorman, who bore him 
seven children, five of whom are living at the present time (1905) : William 
Leonard, whose personal sketch follows this in the work ; James McConaughv, 
of Greensburg : Charles Austin, a resident of Wilkinsburg, a suburb of the 
city of Pittsburg: Lizzie, at home'; and Dr. Joseph Edwin, whose personal 
sketch follows that of William Leonard. At the death of Samuel Mitinger his 
widow was left with a family of seven small children, for whom she provided 
to the best of her abilitv, and as the sons approached years of maturity they 
proved themselves worthy of the devotion of their mother, being energetic, 
willing to work and ready to assist her in every possible way. Mrs. Mitinger 
died June 29, 1894. 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 6l 

John F. Mitinger, son of Samuel and Catherine (PoormanJ Mitinger, was 
born in South Huntingdon township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, Oc- 
tober 5, 1851. He resided on the farm until the age of sixteen years, when he 
accompanied his parents on their removal to Greensburg, in which city the 
remainder of his life was spent. He obtained a fair education in the common 
schools of his native county, but owing to the death of his father the practical 
duties and responsibilities were early placed upon his shoulders. His first 
emplovment after locating in Greensburg was that of driving a work team, but 
shortlv afterwards he secured a position as messenger in the local office of the 
Adams E.xpress Company. Later he became a c.lerk in the restaurant and ice 
cream business of Joseph Taylor, with whom he remained until 1879, \\'hen he 
engaged in business on his own account in the building now occupied by the 
Singer Sewing Machine Company, in East Pittsburg street, where he contin- 
ued operations for a number of years and where he laid the foundation for the 
comfortable fortune which he acquired during his active career. In 1886 he 
purchased what is now known as the Alitinger Block, in South Alain street, re- 
modeling the building when the growth of his business demanded increased 
facilities, and there continuing to conduct a general baking and confectionery 
business until his death, his establishment being the leading one in that line in 
the city. He controlled a large wholesale and retail trade, special attention be- 
ing given to the manufacture of candies and ice cream. The enterprise is still 
carried forward by his brothers, who are classed among the prominent business 
men of the community. 

Mr. Mitinger identified himself with various civic and business interests of 
importance, and was essentially public-spirited and progressive in his attitude 
as a citizen and business man. He was a stockholder and director in the West- 
moreland National Bank and treasurer of the Greensburg Building and Loan 
Association. He early became a member of the Greensburg fire department, 
in which he always evinced a deep interest. He was a valued member of the 
Pennsylvania Firemen's Association, of which he was president in 1900, and he 
previously served as president of the Western Pennsylvania Firemen's Associa- 
tion, in which about thirty counties are represented. He was chief of the 
Greensburg fire department at the time of his death, having been the incumbent 
for three terms. Honest, straightforward and endowed with marked executive 
ability, Mr. Mitinger amassed a handsome competency, his estate at the time 
of his decease, August i, 1904, being conservatively estimated at a valuation o^ 
one hundred thousand dollars. A very considerable portion of this was devised 
to various institutions, and his bequests were the largest in this line ever made 
by any citizen of Greensburg. He remembered the church with which he was 
connected, the Greensburg Hospital, the Children's Aid Society, the Greensburg 
hose companies, as well as many relatives and intimate friends. His name was 
a synonym of honor and his loss was deeply felt in the business and social life 
of the city, with whose interests he had been so long and prominentlv connected. 

WILLLVM LEONARD MITINGER, son of Samuel and Catherine 
I'Poorman) Mitinger, was born in East Huntingdon townshij), Westmoreland, 
county, Pennsylvania, January 3. 1854, and is now numljered among the busmtss 
men of Greensburg. 

He was a lad of about thirteen years at the time of his father's death, and 
from thenceforth was compelled largely to provide for his own maintenance aud- 
io depend upon his own resources. He was enabled to avail himself of the ad- 
vantages of the public schools of his native township, and after completing his 



62 HISTORY OF IVESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

studies became a clerk in the shoe store of Theodore F. Anshutz, of Grecns- 
burg, and later became an apprentice in the foundry of the Fisher and Hawkly 
Company, at Greensburg, where he learned the trade of iron moulding, which, 
however", he never followed as an occupation after completing his apprentice- 
ship. He accepted a clerkship in the Derry office of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company, and after a short period of time became a locomotive fireman in the 
employ of the same company. In this capacity he served five years, at the ex- 
piration of which he was promoted to the responsible position of engineer, 
in which he continued for fourteen and half years, becoming one of 
the trusted and popular engineers of the Pennsylvania system. He then ac- 
cepted a position as engineer for a firm of railroad contractors, after which he 
secured a clerkship in the office of the county recorder of Westmoreland county, 
a position which he continued to hold for three years. Thereafter he was em- 
ployed as salesman in the store of his older brother, John F. Mitinger, whose 
sketch precedes this, with whom he remained until 1903, when he was ap- 
pointed secretary to Senator Cyrus E. Woods, chairman of judiciary (general 
committee) of the state senate,' at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, remaining the in- 
cumbent of this office for one term. Upon his return to Greensburg he re- 
entered the employ of his brother, with whom he remained until the death of 
the latter, when he assumed charge of the business in association with his 
A^ounger brother, Dr. Joseph Edwin Mitinger, whose sketch follows this, and 
they have continued the same most successfully up to the present time._ William. 
L. Mitinger has practically the entire active management of the business, and 
is ably upholding the high reputation attained by the concern. In 1900 iMr. 
]\Iitinger served as census enumerator in Greensburg, and has also held otner 
positions of trust and responsibility. He is an effective worker in the interests 
of the Republican party. Mr. Mitinger married, July 16, 1885, Elsie A. Slack, 
daughter of David and Elizabeth Slack, of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and of the 
four children of this union only one is living, Elizabeth Catherine. Mr. and 
Mrs. Mitinger are members of the First Methodist Episcopal church of their 
home city. 

JOSEPH EDWIN MITINGER, D. D. S., son of Samuel and Cath- 
erine (Poorman) IMitinger, was born in Hempfield township, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, January 5, 1863, and is now one of the representative 
members of the dental profession in Westmoreland county, and engaged in the 
successful practice of the same in the city of Greensburg. 

He acquired his early educational advantages in the public schools and 
seminary of Greensburg. After leaving school he secured a position in the 
scale or w-eighing office of the Pennsylvania Railroad at Huff Station, being em- 
ployed as weighing clerk, in which capacity he had charge of the weighing of 
all coke handled at this point by the company. After following this line of 
work for a period of almost six years, he matriculated in the Pennsylvania Col- 
lege of Dentistry, in the city of Philadelphia, where he completed the prescribed 
course, graduating as a member of the class of 1892 and receiving his degree 
of Doctor of Dental Surgery. He at once opened an office in Greensburg, 
where he has since been actively engaged in the work of his profession. Dur- 
ing the passing years his practice has increased in volume and importance, and 
his offices are fully equipped with every modern and practical device for both 
operative and laboratory work. In politics Dr. Mitinger gives an unqualified 
allegiance to the Republican party. He is actively identified with the ]\Iasonic 
order, and is a prominent member of the Greensburg Driving Club, of which he 




^^h-tX^^^£^X/£^ie>ca^c^^ 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 63 

is secretary. He takes a keen and active interest in athletic sports. Dr. Mit- 
inger married, April 11, 1895, ]Mary Clarke Bray, born in Rockaway, New Jer- 
sey, a danghter of John W. and Caroline Z. Bray. Their children are : Edward, 
born October 31, 1898; and Robert, born May 17, 1902. 

LEONARD KECK. Both by birth and lineage Leonard Keck, of 
Greensbnrg, is a German. Adam Keck was a native of W'urtcmberg and there 
followed the calling of a farmer. Llis son. Christian Keck, was born in the 
same place and devoted himself likewise to agricultural pursuits. In his latter 
years he emigrated to the Cnited States, where he passed the remainder of his 
life. He was a regular attendant and strict member of the Evangelical Lutheran 
church. In 1832 he married Rosa, daughter of Andrew Schwartz, and of their 
ten children six are now living, among them Leonard, mentioned hereafter. 
Christian Keck died October 9, 1881. 

Leonard Keck, youngest son of Christian and Rosa (Schwartz) Keck, was 
born April 12, 1849, i" ^^ urtemberg, and was reared on a farm, receiving his 
education in private schools. He learned the trade of a linen weaver, which 
he followed for two years. At the age of seventeen he resolved to seek his for- 
tune in the United States, and in company with his brother Frederick embarked 
on a westward bound vessel which landed them in New York city, June 28, 
1866. Failing to secure any remunerative employment in that city he proceeded 
to western Pennsylvania, where he dug coal and worked at whatever else of- 
fered for the space of three months. In 1869 he moved to Greensbnrg, where 
he became a clerk in the store of Donohoe & Brother, to whom his services were 
peculiarly acceptable on account of his ability to speak the German language, 
many of their customers being natives of the Fatherland. He remained with 
the firm eleven years, and in 1880 opened a store on Main street, where his space 
was not one-half as large as any one of the three departments of his present ex- 
tensive establishment. This initial efifort was made about the time when Greens- 
burg began to give promise in regard to her future importance as an industrial 
and commercial centre of' western Pennsylvania, and for over twenty years 
Mr. Keck successfully conducted his Main street store, never interesting him- 
self in politics or engaging in speculations, but giving his whole time and at- 
tention to his business. He soon acquired a patronage and an increase of trade 
calling for a far larger space and stock of goods than he then owned. To meet 
this demand he enlarged his present site on South Main street, near the court 
house, where his establishment is divided into three commodious departments, 
each of which is under the charge of an experienced manager. His sales 
yearly are in the neighborhood of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, and 
he numbers among his patrons the leading families of the town and county. 
Mr. Keck married, October 23, 1872, Lydia A., daughter of George Hons, of 
New Stanton, and their children are: Joseph Edward, bom June 30, 1874; 
Charles Warden, born June 26, 1876; Annie Marie, born August 29, 1885; 
Helen Winifred, born January 3, 1888; Leonard B., born October 11, 1890; 
George E., born October 22. 1893 ; Richard Allen, born February 11, 1895 : and 
John Adam, born March 21, 1897. 

COLONEL ISRAEL PAINTER was born in ITcmiifield tonmship, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. November 11, 1810. He was of German 
descent on both his father's and mother's side. Jacob Painter, his grandfather, 
after marriage emigrated from Mecklenburg, Germany, and settled in Berks 
county, Pennsylvania. Here six children were born : Jacob, Michael, John and 



64 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

Tobias. One daughter was married to George Myers, and the other was mar- 
ried to Christopher Harrold. Jacob Painter and his wife died and were buried 
in Berks county. Jacob Painter, their eldest son, married a daughter of a Mr. 
Rapiere, who lived in Indiana county, and settled on a farm in Hempfield town- 
ship, situated on the Big Sewickley creek, eight miles south of Greensburg, 
which was known for many years as the "Judge Painter place." By his first 
wife he had children : Betsey, Rebecca, Catharine, Tobias, George, Elias. His 
first wife died, and was buried at Harrold's Church. He married (second) 
Catharine, daughter of Christopher and Elizabeth ( Mueller) Lobingier. By her 
he had ten children: Polly, John, Jacob, Christopher, George, Joseph, JSenjamin, 
Susan, Israel and Sophia. Jacob Painter always lived on tlie farm on which he 
first settled. He built on the place a stone grist mill which he carried on in 
connection with his farming. He was an energetic, active business man, a 
member of the legislature for several terms, justice of the peace for many 
years, and was the Whig candidate for congress against William Findley, in 
which contest he came within seventeen votes of being elected. He held the 
position of associate judge at the time of his death. He was a man of com- 
manding presence, being about six feet in height, heavy set, and weighing al^out 
two hundred and twenty pounds. In personal appearance his son. Colonel Israel 
Painter, is said to have resembled him. He died at the age of fifty-nine, and 
was buried at Harrold Church. His widow, Catharine, survived him about 
thirty years, lived with her sons. Christopher and Israel, at the "Willow-tree 
Farm,"' where she died, aged eighty-four, and was buried at Markle cemetery. 
His daughter Betsev was wife of General Joseph Markle, and mother of Gen- 
eral C. P. Markle, of "Millgrove." 

Christopher Lobingier, grandfather of Catharine Lobinger, the second 
wife of Judge Jacob Painter, came from Mecklenberg, Germany, and settled in 
Dauphin county. He was married before leaving Germany. Little is known of 
him except that he was a farmer, and that both he and his wife died, and are 
buried in Dauphin county. They had one son, Christopher, who married ( 1766)1 
Elizabeth Mueller, by whom he had eight children : John, Christopher, Cath- 
arine, Barbara, Mary, Elizabeth, Susan and George. His wife died at Stoys- 
town, Somerset county, September 15, 1815, aged seventy-one years. He set- 
tled in Mount Pleasant township in 1772, was a member of the Pennsylvania 
constitutional convention of 1776, and of the house of representatives from 
1791 to 1793. He died July 4, 1798, and was buried at the Presbyterian meet- 
ing house near Pleasant Unity. 

Israel Painter lived at home until he was seventeen years of age. He then 
taught the district school two terms, and was employed as clerk at Mount 
Pleasant in his brother Christopher's store one year. He then attended several 
terms at Jefferson College, Canonsburg. In company with a Mr. Newmyer in 
1830, he purchased his brother's store in Mount Pleasant and carried it on one 
year. He next built the "Mastodon" Salt Works, subsequently became inter- 
ested in the "Fountain" and "Mammoth" salt works and was the owner of them 
all at the time of his death. In company with Daniel Waltz, he put down a 
salt well in Monongah county. West \'irginia, and established salt works there, 
an enterprise requiring no small amount of pluck and energy, on account of 
the transportation through an almost unbroken wilderness of everything 
required in its construction and operation. He was interested in 
these works from 1832 to 1835. He became at an early date an 
extensive dealer in live stock — horses, cattle, hogs and sheep. His 
operations in this line of trade took a wide range, extending through 



HISTORY OF irESr.UORELAND COUXTV 



the states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky, and West Mrginia, and 
during the Civil war his dealings with the government in cattle, horses and 
mules were on a large scale. Though not of the same political faith, he enjoyed 
the acquaintance and confidence of President Lincoln, a relation which was of 
great service to him in his operations with the government. Through his brother 
Christopher he became at one time largely interested in the cotton trade, mak- 
ing a number of trips to New Orleans in that interest. His operations in real 
estate were carried on upon the most extended scale. These embraced the pur- 
chase and sale of over one hundred farms in Westmorland county alone, while 
he also operated largely in lands in Fayette, Indiana, and other Western Penn- 
sylvania counties. At the time of his death he was the owner of thirtv-two 
farms. He operated largely in oil and oil lands. From 1865 to the time of his 
death Colonel Painter gave much attention to coal and coal lands. He was the 
first to introduce coal into the eastern market, western Pennsylvania, eastern 
manufacturers of gas using up to that time an imported coal as a gas coal for 
that purpose. In company with John George, Jr., Colonel Lewis McFarland 
and others, he purchased large tracts of coal lands on the line of the Penn- 
sylvania railroad in North Huntingdon township, selling the coal to the Penn 
Gas-Coal Company and \\'estmoreland Coal Company. In company with Gen- 
eral Herman Haught. John Derbyshire, H. N. Burroughs. S. B. and C. P. 
Markle. he bought and sold many hundreds of acres of coal lands in Sewickley 
township. He built seventy-four coking ovens in Bullskin township, Favette 
county in 1873. and carried them on till 1879. He owned one hundred and sev- 
enty acres of coking coal lands near IMount Pleasant at the time of his death. 
He was interested in contracts for the construction of sections of the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad, of the Northwest Pennsylvania railroad, also of the Pittsburg 
and Erie and Connellsville railroads. He was a stockholder in the Mount 
Pleasant and Robbstown turnpike, also in the Youghiogheny Navigation Com- 
pany. He was prime mover in the building of the Southwest Pennsvlvania 
railroad, also the Alount Pleasant and Broad Ford railroad, and a director in 
both, as also in the Pittsburg and Connellsville railroad. He was associated 
with Governor John W. Geary in contesting the will of Stephen Girard, in behalf 
of the heirs of the latter against the city of Philadelphia. He represented his 
district in the house of representatives from 1846 to 1848; was canal commis- 
sioner from 1849 to 1852; was a delegate to the Democratic national convention 
the party. He was at one time a candidate for his party for nomination to con- 
at Charlestown, South Carolina, identifying himself with the Douglas wing of 
gress, but was defeated in the convention by Hon. Henry D. Foster. His death 
was the result of an accident. By a fall a glass bottle was crushed in his hand, 
by which the latter was so cut and lacerated he survived the eft'ect of it only 
ten days. He died July 4, 1880. It has fallen to the lot of but few men to be 
more prominent in business affairs than Colonel Israel Painter. His energy 
and will seemed inexhaustible. He was constantly on the alert. With him to 
thmk was to act. Dufficulties and obstacles which would have evcrwhelmed and 
swamped most men only inspired in him renewed exertions. All his enterprises 
were conductedon a large scale. To figure in a small way with him was an im- 
possibility. In his disposition he was wholesouled and genial, consequently few 
men commanded a wiiler or warmer circle of friends. 

JAMES E. GILLAND, proprietor of one of the leading business es- 
tablishments of Greensburg, was born in Franklintown, York couiitv. Penn- 
sylvania, August 12, 1861, a son of James and Mary Jane (McDonald)' Gilland, 

■2 — 5 



66 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

who had seven other children, as follows : 'Mary Etta, Lizzie, William, Cora, 
Charles, George, and Anna, deceased. James Gilland (father) was born east of 
the Alleghany Mountains in Pennsylvania, and later settled in Clarion county, 
same state, where he purchased a farm, cultivated and improved the same and 
resided thereon for the remainder of his life. 

James E. Gilland received a practical education in the common schools of 
Canada, Clarion county, Pennsylvania, and at the early age of twelve years 
left school in order to learn the trade of painter, which he has followed through- 
out his active career. At the present time ( 1905) he is the proprietor of a store 
located on West Otterman street, Greensburg, which is well stocked with all 
kinds of paints, brushes and oils, and he also contracts for the painting of 
houses, both inside and out. He is genial and pleasant in manner, attends 
promptly to the wants and wishes of his patrons, and therefore well merits 
the large patronage acconled him. His political views coincide with those of 
the Democratic party, to \vhich organization he has given his allegiance since 
attaining his majority. Mr. Gilland married, July 2, 1885, Anna Horner, born 
in Berlin, Germany, June 31, 1866, a daughter of Henry and Amelia Horner, 
and their children are: Walter M., a painter by trade, employed by the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company ; George R., a barber by trade, employed in Pitcairn ; 
Charles, Lena E., ]\Iargaret, Clarence, Mary, James, and Victor. 

^lARTIN NELSON McGEARY is a representative member of the 
bar of Westmoreland county, and is of the fourth generation of his family in 
this attractive division of the Keystone commonwealth, where his ancestors set- 
tled in the eighteenth century, while the name has ever since been honorably 
linked with the industrial and civic history of the county. Mr. McGeary was 
born on the homestead farm in Allegheny township, this county, September 10, 
i860, and is a son of John E. and Sarah Jane (McLaughlin) McGeary, both of 
whom were born and reared in the same township, where they still maintain 
their home, the father having devoted his active career to agricultural pursuits 
and being one of the prominent and influential farmers of the county, where he 
has ever commanded the unequivocal confidence and esteem of his fellowmen. 
He is a Republican in his political proclivities, and both he and his wife have 
long been members of the LTnited Presbyterian church. Of their seven chil- 
dren six are living, the subject of this review having been the eldest in order of 
birth. John E. McGeary is a son of James and Margaret (Elliott) McGeary, 
the former of whom was born in Allegheny township, this county, in 1801, 
while the latter was born near the city of Pittsburg. 

Martin N. McGeary was reared to the sturdy discipline of the farm, and 
after completing the curriculum of the public schools entered the Pennsylvania 
State College, at State College, where he remained as a student for three years. 
Upon leaving school he began reading law in the office of the well known firm 
of Marchand & Gaithers, of Greensburg, and he devoted himself with all earn- 
estness and appreciative effort to his technical study until he realized his ambi- 
tion, being admitted to the bar of his native county April 17, 1887. Since that 
time he has pressed steadilv forward to the mark of his calling, has gained 
recognition as one of the well equipped lawyers of the county, and has built 
up an excellent practice of representative character. He is known as a strong 
and spirited trial lawyer and ever gives careful preparation to every cause which 
he presents before court or jury, while in counsel he is discriminating and con- 
servative. In politics I\Ir. McGeary is found stanchly arrayed as a supporter 
of the principles and policies of the Republican party, and in a fraternal way 




fOc 




HISTORY OF irESTMORELAXD COUXTV. 67 

-is identified with Westmoreland Lodge, No. 518, A. F. A. AI. : and Greensburg 
Lodge, Xo. 511, B. P. O. E. He is a member of the United Presbyterian 
chiirdi. :\Ir.'McGearv married, July 31, 1901, Agnes Huston, born and reared 
in Fairfield to\vnship,'this county, daughter of John B. and Elizabeth Pluston, 
the former of whom is one of the representative farmers of that locality, while 
lie was formerly a successsful school teacher. 

FRANK R. ZAHNISER, D. D. S. Dentistry in its modern form rep- 
resents both a science and a mechanic art, and he who would be successful in its 
practice must be equipped both through natural predilection and most careful 
and discriminating preliminary training. Among the leading members of the 
profession in the city of Greensburg is numbered Dr. Zahniser, whose skill in 
Tboth the operative and laboratory department of his profession is of the highest 
order and who has naturally succeeded in building up a profitable practice of 
representative order, his finely equipped offices being located in the \^'clty 
building, at 130 North ^Lain streeet. 

Dr. Frank Robinson Zahniser is a native of the Keystone state, having been 
born in :Mercer, .Mercer county, Pennsylvania, April 15, 1865, and being a son of 
M. J. and Elizabeth (Hurst) Zahniser, the fomier a resident of Pittsburg, and 
the latter deceased. Both parents were natives of Pennsylvania, and represen- 
tative of old and honored families of this commonwealth, while the genealogy in 
the agnatic line is traced back to stanch German origin. The father of Dr. 
Zahniser was for many years engaged in the lumber business, but is now devot- 
ing his attention to the real estate business in Pittsburg. Of the five children in 
the family Dr. Zahniser was the second in order of birth, while of the number 
three are living at the time of this writing. 

Dr. Zahniser secured his rudimentary educational discipline in the public 
schools of his native county, where he continued his studies until he had at- 
tained the age of fourteen years, after which he entered ]\Iount Pleasant Acad- 
emy, at Mount Pleasant, Westmoreland county, where he remained as a student 
for three years. In 1888 he matriculated in the Pennsylvania Dental College, in 
the city of Philadelphia, where he completed the prescribed technical course and 
was graduated as a member of the class of 1889, simultaneously receiving his 
well earned degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery and coming forth admirably 
well equipped for the work of his chosen profession. That this statement is 
unequivocal needs no farther voucher than the success which has been his in 
his chosen field of endeavor, for through his devotion to his profession and his 
ability in the same he has built up a lucrative practice and attained to no uncer- 
tain precedence in the connection. He opened an office in Greensburg shortly 
after his graduation and here has ever since continued in active practice. He 
is a member of Western Pennsylvania Dental Society. Dr. Zahniser married, 
February 15, 1893, Jeanette Suydam, a daughter of J. L. aad Mary E. Suydam, 
of Greensburg. where she was reared and educated. Dr. and Mrs. Zahniser 
have two daughters, Elizabeth and Eleanor. He and his family are members of 
the First Presbyterian church. 

LLOYD BURRELL HUFF. One of the representative young busi- 
ness men of Westmoreland county is Lloyd Burrell Hufif, the oldest son of Hon. 
George F. and Henrietta Burrell HufT, of Greensburg. and grandson of the 
Hon. Jeremiah Murray Burrell, president judge of the tenth judicial district of 
Pennsylvania, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work. 

He was born in Greensburg on the eighth day of December, 1871, was edit- 



68 HISTORY OF IVhS'l MORELAXD COUXTV. 

cated in the public scliools, after which he entered Trinity Hall, a well equipped 
preparatory institution at Washington, Pennsylvania. In 1889 he matriculated 
in the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute at Troy, New York. In i8yi he left 
college to enter the coal and coke business with his father, taking charge of 
development work on a large coal and timber property near South Fork, in the 
Allegheny Mountains; in 1893 he returned to Greensburg and became treasurer 
and manager of all the important mining properties in that section. When the 
Keystone Coal & Coke Company, one of the largest coal and coke producers in 
Pennsylvania, was organized he became treasurer and general manager, his 
father, Hon. George F. Huff, being the president. Mr. Huff has gained pres- 
tige in other fields as an able and progressive young business man, well fitted 
for handling affairs of scope and importance, being president of the Pittsburg, 
McKeesport & Greensburg Railway Company, a director of the First National 
Bank of Greensburg and other like enterprises ; also identified with both state 
and national horticultural and improvement associations. In his political pro- 
clivities Mr. Huff is a staunch Republican, for some years a member of the state 
central committee, and a lo\al and efficient worker in his party. In 1895 he was 
appointed to the military staff of Governor Daniel H. Hastings with the rank, 
of lieutenant-colonel. At the outbreak of the Spanish-American war he was 
promoted to assistant commissary general of the national guard of Pennsyl- 
vania, and was one of the first to be called into service by the governor. He 
received orders to assist in the commissary arrangements necessary to put the 
Pennsylvania soldiers into the field, which work was accomplished with com- 
mendable ability. He married, June 21, 1897, Eleanor Warren Moorhead, the 
second daughter of Hon. James S. Moorhead, one of the most prominent and 
leading members of the Westmoreland county bar. Mr. and Mrs. Huff have 
two children, Eleanor Moorhead and Elizabeth. 

(For the genealogy of the Huff Family see sketch of Hon. George F. Huff.) 

JAMES LAWRENCE KENNEDY, LL. M. Among the native 
sons of Westmoreland county who have here attained to success and worthy 
prestige in connection with the practice of law is Mr. Kennedy, who is one of 
the representative younger members of the bar of the county, being established 
in the practice of his profession in the city of Greensburg. He has worked his 
way to the front through earnest and well directed endeavor, and in his course 
has held no obstacle as insuperable, so that his advancement has been consec- 
utive and well defined. 

James Lawrence Kennedy was born at Penn's Station, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, June 15, 1866, and is a son of Denis and Ellen ( Keefe) 
Kennedy, both of whom were born in Ireland. The father immigrated from the 
Emerald Isle to America in 1849, ^"d here began his active career as a day 
laborer, while he eventually accumulated a good propertv through his faithful 
eff'orts and provident methods, while his intrinsic integritv gained and retained 
to him the respect and confidence of his fellowmen. He died August 3. 1905. 
His widow resides in Penn Station. Both he and his wife were communicants 
of the Catholic church. They became the parents of five sons and two daugh- 
ters, of whom James L. is the fifth in order of birth. 

James L. Kennedy secured his early education in the public schools of the 
borough of Penn, and later continued his studies in the high school at Greens- 
burg, while he early formulated plans for his future career, determining to 
a<lopt the profession of law. After careful preliminarv reading under able pre- 
ceptors he entered the law department of Catholic University of America in the 



HISTORY OF U'ESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 69 

city of Washington, D. C, where he completed the prescribed course and was 
graduated as a member of the class of i8g6, in March, receiving the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws, while in June, i8g6, his alma mater conferred upon him the 
degree of Master of Laws, after he had taken special post-graduate work. He 
studied economics under Charles P. Xeill and Carroll D. \\'right. while other 
instructors were men of distinction in their assigned departments. As private 
legal preceptors Mr. Kennedy was favored in having Messrs. \'incent E. Wil- 
liams and Williaiu A. Griffith, prominent members of the Westmoreland county 
bar, and he was dulv admitted to the bar of his native county in 1892, at which 
time he was incumbent of the office of court stenographer. This position he 
continued to retain until 1896, in which vear he began the active practice of his 
profession, opening an office in Greensburg, where he has since maintained his 
headquarters and where he has proved significantly successful in the various 
departments of his professional work, having a clientage of distinctively repre- 
sentative character. Though he has never been ambitious for )niblic office ]\Ir. 
Kennedy is a stalwart advocate of the principles and policies of the Democratic 
party, in whose local ranks he has been more or less active in the various cam- 
paigns. He clings to his ancestral faith and is a communicant of the Catholic 
church, while in a fraternal way he is affiliated with the K. C. and the B. P. O. 
E. He is held in high regard in the professional and business circles of his 
home city and is well entitled to this recognition as one of the able and popular 
members of the bar of Westmoreland county. 

EDWARD BARRY KEXLY, a Union veteran of the civil war, book- 
"keeper for the last eighteen years for Struble & Walthour, proprietors of the 
large Ludwick planing mill and lumber yard, also justice of the peace for sixth 
ward, Greensburg, formerly Ludwick borough, now serving his third term, 
was born near Harvey's Five Points, Westmoreland countv, Pennsvlvania, 
March 5, 1845. 

His great-grandfather, ^^■illiam Kenly, a native of Hartford countv, Alarv- 
land, who later removed to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, became verv wealthy 
through investments in real estate. During the war of the revolution, by a 
colonial appointment, he assisted in raising funds to defray the expenses "of 'the 
Continental army. In the archives of the revolutionary war are found notes, or 
scrip issued as Continental money bearing his signature. He was a brother-in- 
law of General Josiah Harmar, a resident of Philadelphia, of revolutionar\- war 
fame, and subsequently commander-in-chief of the United States army, and 
personallv in command of troops defending settlements in the northwest terri- 
tory. William Kenly was the father of one child. Dr. Charles Jenkins Kenly. 

Dr. Charles Jenkins Kenly was for manv vears a practicing phvsician of 
Phdadelphia. He left that city and came to 'Bell townshiiD, Westmoreland 
county, where he invested quite largelv in real estate, and being wealthv lived 
a retired life. Ten years after his removal to Bell township he^ died, June 23. 
1828. from injuries received from being thrown from a horse, and his'remains 
M-ere interred in the churchyard at Murravsville, Penn.svlvania. He married' 
Theresa Barry, born in Philadelphia, 1784, and died in Greensliurg, 1863. Dr. 
and Mrs. Kenly were the parents of five children— three daughters and two 
sons — who grew to manhood and womanhood. 

Richard Barry Kenly, one of the above named family, was born in Hell 
township. Westmoreland county. Pennsylvania. Februarv 2, 1821. ,\bout the 
time of his majority he engaged in the drug business in Greensbure, but shortly 
afterward left the drug trade and operated a general merchandise store for 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



several years at Weavers Old Stand. After disposing of his store he pur- 
chased the Kern farm, which was situated one mile southeast of Greensburg: 
in 1855 he sold this farm to Robert Lowry. On April i, 1856, Mr. Kenly re- 
moved to Ludvvick, established a grocery and provision store, and at the sam. 
time opened the first retail lumber-yard in Westmoreland county, in which 
business he was engaged at the time of his death, March 9, 1886. In May, 
1843, he married Lucinda C. Turncy, a daughter of Jacob and Margaret 
(Singer) Turney, of Greensburg, and sister of Hon. Jacob Turney, Jr., mem- 
ber of congress for two terms from the Westmoreland, Fayette and Greene 
district. Mrs. Kenly was born September 15, 1819, died Juiie 13, 1895. She 
was a noble woman, fond mother, a devout Christian, and a member of the 
Presbyterian church. Mr. and Mrs. Kenly had eleven children : Edward B., 
Margaret T., Lucy C, Nannie S., wife of Robert Hughan, of Parnassus, Penn- 
sylvania ; Carrie L., wife of William Orr; and Charles Harmar, a rural delivery 
mail carrier. Five children died from one to seven years of age. Richard B. 
Kenly, the father of the above named family, was a conscientious Christian ; an 
ardent temperance man and cliristian worker; an elder in the Presbvterian 
church ; a public-spirited citizen, always alert and working to the best interests 
of the town; a school director for seven terms; a justice of the peace for five 
years, and frequently a member of the borough council. He assisted in the 
laying out of the borough of Ludwick, and was appointed by the court to give 
notice of the first municipal election, June 6, 18^9. 

Edward Barry Kenly, eldest of the children of Richard B. and Lucinda 
(Turney) Kenly, was reared at the county seat, attended the public schools in 
the winter and select schools in the summer. Early in 1861 he graduated from 
Iron City College, and was taking a special course in civil engineering at Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, when the Civil war broke out. he being then sixteen years- 
of age. He left his books and enlisted in the Federal Guards of Allegheny City 
under Captain J. C. Hull (who was killed in the Battle of the Wilderness, May, 
1864,) which company was mustered into the United States service, Julv 4, 

1861, as Company "A," Sixty-second Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer In- 
fantry, commanded by Colonel Samuel Black, who was killed at Gaines' Mill,, 
Virginia, June 26, 1862. Before embarking for Fortress Monroe, in March, 

1862, Mr. Kenly was detailed as clerk at headquarters of General Silas Casey, 
who commanded the Second Division of the Fourth Army Corps during the 
Peninsular Campaign, famous for its malaria, muddy marches and hard fought 
battles, and was retained in the same position by Major-General John J. Peck, 
who succeeded General Casey in command of the division after the Battle of 
Fair Oaks or Seven Pines, and was with General Peck during all of his services 
in Virginia and North Carolina. In April, 1864, after the battle of Plymouth, 
North Carolina. General Peck was transferred to the Department of New York 
city, and Mr. Kenly was directed to report to E. M. Stanton, secretary of war.. 
Upon his arrival in Washington, D. C, he was assigned to duty as a clerk in 
room No. 54, war department, containing all the reports, returns and papers 
belonging or relating to the volunteers from the states of Ohio and Michigan,, 
where he served until July 27, 1864, when he was honorably discharp-ed on 
account of the expiration of his three years' term of enlistment. Adjutant- 
General Thomas offered him a civil appointment, but he refused it in order to 
return home and continue his studies at school. Several weeks after his return, 
wh.lst on a visit to the surviving members of his old company in Allegheny 
City. Captain J. W. Kirker. provost marshal of the Twenty-third congre'^sionar 
district of Pennsylvania, with headquarters in that city, prevailed upon him to- 



HISTORY OF IVESTMORELAXD COUNTY. 71 

accept a clerkshio in his office, where he remained until it was discontnuicil 
several months after the war had ended. ^Ir. Kenly then went into the oil 
business in \\'estern \'irginia, continuing for about one year, after which he 
entered Dartmouth College, but on account of sickness and the severity of 
climate in New Hampshire he returned home before graduating. The two fol- 
lowing years he read law with his uncle, Hon. Jacob Turney, but the profes- 
sion of law not suiting him, he assisted his father in the lumber business, and 
since the death of the" latter has continued along the same line. In politics he 
was an active Democrat until President Cleveland's second term, when on 
account of well known differences he joined in the rush and stampede of thous- 
ands of tariff-protection and Union-soldier Democrats to the Republican party. 
He is a member of the U. \'. L., G. A. R., and K. and L. of H. Mr. Kenly mar- 
ried, January 30, 1890, Eleanor L. Crock, daughter of Emanuel and Mary 
(Thomas) Crock. They have two sons: Edward B., born January 25, 1901 ; 
and William C. W., born Februarv 19, 1902. Mr. and Mrs. Kenly are mem- 
bers of the Second Reformed Church of Greensburg, Pennsylvania. 

WILLIAM WESLEY ULERICH, present county superintendent of 
public schools for Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, has served in such edu- 
cational capacitv for the past twelve years, during which time he has succeeded 
in raising high' the standard of the public schools. He was born in Ligonier 
Valley. Pennsylvania, February 5, i860, the son of John Nicholas and Mary 
Ann (Caylor) Ulerich. 

The grandfather, Samuel Ulerich, was the first member of this family to 
locate in Westmoreland county. He came from Germany about 1808, settling 
in Carlisle, Cumberland county, Pennsylvania. He was a tanner by trade. 
From family records it appears that he took little part in either politics or relig- 
ious work, but was an industrious, faithful citizen of his adopted country. His 
wife was Marv Elizabeth McDowell, of whose family history but little is known. 
Their children were : Julia Ann. Joseph. John Nicholas, and William. 

John Nicholas L'lerich (father) was born in Ligonier township, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, and his wife, Mary Ann Caylor, in Unity town- 
ship, same county. The former was born in 1834, and the latter in 1833. They 
followed farming for a livelihood. John Nicholas had a good common school 
education. He was a member of the Methodist E])iscopal church, and in politics 
was a Republican. For many years he served his district as school tlirector. 
The mother was the daughter of I\Ir. and Mrs. John Caylor. Her father was a 
justice of the peace in Unity township for many years. 

William Wesley Ulerich, son of John N. and Ann (Caylor) Ulerich, 
was educated in the public schools of his native county, the Ligonier Classical 
Institute, and the Indiana State Normal, from which institution he graduated 
in 1884. He followed farm labor until seventeen years of age, and then began 
to teach school, and has ever since been connected with educational institutions. 
He continued to teach until 1884 in rural schools, but in the summer of 
that year was elected to the assistant principalship of the Irwin public schools. 
He served in that capacity one year, and was then chosen as principal of the 
schools at Latrobe. where he remained eight years. In 1893 he was elected 
county superintendent of public schools for Westmoreland county, and has 
served twelve vears and is still in office by reason of his efficiency. Politically 
Mr. Ulerich has always supported the Republican party. He is an active mem- 
ber of the Latrobe Methodist Ejjiscopal church, and is a member of the board 
of trustees of that society; is also chairman of the missionary and music coin- 



72 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAXD COUNTY. 

mittees. He has been the Sunday school sii))erintcndent for the past sixteen 
years. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity; I. O. O. F., and the I. U. H. 
Mr. Ulerich was one of the founders of the Ridgeview Chautauqua, serving 
on its executive committees for six years. He was also a member of the Ridge- 
view Park, and trustee of the committee for six years. His has been an active 
life. His efforts to build up good schools and advance the interests of his 
chosen church have been crowned with unusual success. Mr. Ulerich married, 
December 9, 1896, Nora B. Walter, at Markleton, Pennsylvania. She possessed 
a good public school education. She died February 28, 1903. Her jjarents 
were William and Mary Walter. Fler father taught school and later became a 
merchant. Mr. Ulerich married (second), August 17, 1905, Anna Susan 
Keener, daughter of Henry F. Keener, a minister of the German Reformed 
church, and his wife, Julia Elizabeth. Henry F. Keener is deceased, and his 
wife lives in Latrobc, Penns_\lvania. Anna Susan Keener was educated at the 
Indianan State Normal ; and at the Oswego State Normal, (Jswego, New York. 
She is a teacher by profession, principal of the third ward primary school at 
Latrobe. She is a member of the Methodist church and superintendent of 
the primary department of the Sabbath school connected therewith. 

HON. HENRY S. ACKERMAN, one of the leading and substantial 
business men of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and ex-member of the 
Pennsylvania house of representatives, was born April 9, 1845, '" Unitv town- 
ship, Westmoreland county, a son of Henry and Catherine (Smith) Ackerman. 
The progenitor of the Ackerman family in America was Philip Ackerman, the 
grandfather of Henry S., a native of Germany, who emigrated to this country, 
settling in Unity township, Westmoreland comity, Pennsylvania. He married 
Christina Reed and had a son Henry. 

Henry Ackerman, son of Philip and Christina (Reed) Ackerman, and 
father of Henry S. Ackerman, was born on his father's farm, February 2, 1801. 
He followed agricultural pursuits, owned an excellent farm, achieved the most 
gratifying success in this line, and was held in high esteem by his neighbors. 
Politically he was a life-long Democrat, and while taking a livelv interest in the 
affairs of that organization never aspired to public office. He cast his first 
presidential ballot for General Jackson, and served one term as school director. 
In matters of religion Mr. Ackerman was a member of the Lutheran 
church at Youngstown, and frequently served as local officer. In 182'^ Mr. 
Ackerman married Catherine Smith, a daughter of Joseph Smith, of Derry 
township. They had nine children, one of whom was Henry S.. mentioned 
hereafter. The death of Henry Ackerman occurred April 5, 1885, and his 
demise was sincerely mourned by a large circle of friends. 

Henry S. Ackerman obtained his early education in the common schools 
of Unity township. After leaving school he engaged for some years in agri- 
cultural pursuits, and later learned the trade of carpenter, which occupation he 
followed with considerable success for nine years. In T879 he opened a nnisi'' 
store in Greensljurg. op])osite the Zimmerman House. He carries a full line of 
fine organs and other first-class musical instruments, and has established an 
extensive and profitable trade in Westmoreland, Favette and Indiana counties, 
and has several men constantly in the field canvassing. In addition to musical 
instruments he also handles the White sewing machine. Mr. Ackerman is a 
man of keen business ability, and this with his unflagging energv and tenacity 
of purpose is a prominent factor of his signal success in business. Politically 




ck^'nut^ 




HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 73 

he is a strong defender of the principles advanced by the Democratic party, 
and works earnestly and untiringly for its success. In 1880 he was nominated 
by the Democrats of Westmorehnd county as a candidate for the legislature 
and was elected. During his term in the legislature he acquitted his duties with 
efficiency and credit, his conduct receiving the highest commendation at tne 
hands of his party. In matters of religion he accords with the doctrines of the 
Lutheran church.' Henrv S. Ackerman married, January 15, 1880, I^Iollie C. 
Weaver, daughter of William Weaver, of Mount Pleasant township, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania. 

LEMUEL OFFUTT, M. D., one of Greensburg's successful medical 
practitioners, was born May 8, 185 1, on a farm between Darnestown and Sen- 
eca Mills, :\Iontgomery county, Maryland, The Offutt family are descended, 
from Scotland through the following line of ancestry : 

I. \\"illiam Offutt, settled in Prince George county, ^ilaryland, where he 
-died in 1734. He married Mary Brock, by whom was born children including a 
son named William. 

II. William Ofifutt, son of William and Mary (Brock) Ofifutt, died in 
IMarvland, in 1737. He married Jane Joyce, and after his death she married 
Dr. James Doull. Among the children o'f William and Jane (Joyce) Offutt was 
■one named William. 

III. \\'illiam Offutt, son of William and Jane (Joyce) Offutt, was born in 
^Montgomery county, Maryland, February 14, 1729, died in 1786. In i7'^o he 
married Elizabeth IMagruder, born November 8, 1730, Among their children 
was a son James. 

IV. James Offutt, son of William and Elizabeth (IMagruder) Offutt, was 
born April" 23, 1753. He became the grandfather of Dr. Lemuel Offutt. James 
Offutt's paternal great-grandfather with his two brothers emigrated from Scot- 
and early in the eighteenth century and located in Maryland, engaging in 
"farming. 

^'. James Offutt, son of James Offutt, a farmer by occupation, was born 
near Great Falls, Maryland, October 3, 1803. He married Mary White, of 
Olney ^Maryland, [March 17, 1849, She was the daughter of Samuel White, 
-^vhose ancestors came from England. Among the children of James and Mary 
(\^^^ite) Offutt was Dr. Lemuel Offutt, born Alay 8, 185 1. 

On the genealogical line of Dr. Oft'utt"s great-grandmother ( Elizabeth 
IMaeruder, born November 8, 1730) the ancestors trace back to 1605, in Scot- 
land, when Alexander Magruder married Ladv Maro-aret Deummond, daughter 
of "Loaird of Avernchiel, Clan Campbell." Alexander IMagruder was born in 
1560, in Scotland. His son Alexander, an officer under Charles II, emigrated 
to Calvert county, Maryland, in 1652, and died in 1677, Ffis son Samuel mar- 
ried Sarah Beall, born 1669, died 1734. He died in Prince George county, 
Maryland, in 1711. He was a member of the Maryland house of burgesses— 
1701-1707. He held civic and military positions, rnd was a vestryman of St. 
Paul's Parish. This line of ancestry then runs through Ninian to his son Samuel, 
who married Margaret Jackson, who died in iSoi. Samuel was born in Mont- 
gomerv county, [Maryland, in 1708: died 1786. Elizabeth, their daughter, born . 
November 8, 1730 became the great-grandmother of Dr. Offutt by marrying 
William Offutt, as above mentioned. 

Yl. Dr. Lemuel Offutt, son of James and ]Marv (White) Offutt, was 
reared to farm labor and attended public and parochial schools, finishing his 
■.studies in Andrew Small Academy. He then taught school three years and 



74 



HISTORY OF JVESTMORELAXD COUXTV 



read medicine under the tutorage of Dr. C. H. Noursc, of Darnestown. .Mary- 
land, entering the medical department of the Maryland University, from which 
he graduated in 1876, having been a resident student in the Maryland Intirm- 
ary eighteen months. He located at Penn Station, Pennsylvania, May 8, 
1876, and there practiced his chosen profession until December, 1883, when 
he moved to Greensburg, where he is still an honorable and highly successful 
physician. In politics Dr. Offutt has ever adhered to the time-honored prin- 
ciples of the Democratic party, but has never sought or held public office. 
Not unlike so many generations of his sturdy Scotch forefathers, he, too, is 
identified with the Presbyterian church. He is also connected with numer- 
ous beneficiary societies. In stating that Dr. Offutt is a self-made man the 
term is used in the true sense. By a defaulting county treasurer in Maryland 
his father lost his property and died when Lemuel was a small lad, hence 
he was early thrown upon his own resources, which were but a good sound 
l)ody and a determination to gain for himself a place among men. Dr. Ofifutt 
has been twice married. In January, 1877, he married Sarah E. Dukes, of 
Baltimore, .Maryland. She died in December, 1900. They had eight chil- 
dren : James H., a contractor ; Mary E., wife of I. C. Ruffner ; Lemuel, died 
in childhood : Sarah D. ; Susan R. ; William G., died in infancy ; Courtney 
C., died in infancy, and Rose E. Offutt. For his second wife Dr. Offutt mar- 
ried, June, 1904, Leola R. Edwards, daughter of Rev. Charles Edwards, of 
Alliance, (Jhio. 

DANIEL REAMER ULERY. Among the trusty employes of the- 
Pennsylvania railroad system residing at Greensburg, Pennsylvania, is Daniel 
R. LHerv, born May 14, 1869, in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. 

(I) Henry LHery (grandfather) came from Germany, his native country, 
antl settled- in LTnity township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. Here 
he married Hannah Hugus, and they became the parents of Sophia, who- 
married Henry Seaman, and they reared a large family. Augustus, born. 
1843, on the old homestead, of whom later. Fanny, married and lives in 
Venango county, Pennsylvania. Herman, married Sadie Blair, of West- 
moreland county. Henry L'lery was by occupation a farmer. 

(II) Augustus L'lery (father), born in 1843, ^^.s been a railroader 
nearly all his life. He now resides at Donahoe, a few miles out of Greens- 
burg. He has been division foreman on the Pennsylvania railroad many years. 
He married Elizabeth Jane Topper, whose brother and sisters were : Wilson 
J., Lovinia, Louisa, deceased ; and Samuel. Mr. and Mrs. Augustus Ulery 
had children : Daniel Reamer, born May 14, 1869, and Louis Marshal, born- 
July 22, 1871. The last named is still single and remains at home. Polit- 
ically the father is a Republican, and was reared in the Reformed church. 

III. Daniel R. Ulery obtained his education at the comon and high 
schools of Greensburg, Pennsylvania. L'pon leaving school he had an am- 
bition to achieve something in life by his own efforts, and at once entered' 
the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, first as a water-boy. 
Proving faithful to this trust he received promotion to the agency at George- 
Station, in 1884, and remained at his duties for seven years at that point. 
He w-as made agent at Donahoe, July i, 1891, where he mastered telegraphy 
and remained to October i, 1895. He has served in the telegraph service 
since 1895, and no-w has charge of the southwest junction, "the tower," at 
Greensburg. Mr. L'lery married, July 2, 1901, Anna Elizabeth Borlin, daugh- 
ter of Albert and Elizabeth (Steiner) Borlin, of Hempfield township. Mrs. 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAXD COUXTV. 75; 

Lien's father ran a livery and also a restaurant at one time in the Jjorough 
of Greensburg. He served in the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Regiment 
of Volunteers from Westmoreland county, being in service from 1861 to 
1865, receiving an honorable discharge. He was born in Salem township 
April 24, 1843, married Elizabeth Steiner, June 25, 1868; she was born in 
West Xewton. October 2, 1848. To Mr. Ulery and wife was born one child,. 
Emily Elizabeth, June 29, 1903. In 1902 Mr. Ulery purchased a comfortable 
residence property at No. 355 East Pittsburg street, Greensburg, not far 
distant from the "Tower," where he is employed as telegrapher. His wife 
is a member of the Lutheran church, which they both attend. He is a mem- 
ber of Philanthropy Lodge, No. 225, A. F. and A. M., of Greensburg, Penn- 
sylvania ; M. W. A., No. 10,950; Branch No. 2 of the Grand Fraternity; ancT 
Pittsburg Division of the Order of Railway Telegraphers, No. 52. Fie also- 
carries a protective policv in the Sun Life Insurance Company of Canada. 

FREEMAN C. GAY. The death of Freeman C. Gay, October 11, 
1900, removed from the town of Greensburg, Westmoreland county, one 
of its leading and substantial business men. He was born in Donegal town- 
ship, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, July 3, 1838, a son of William 
P.. and Martha (Spear) Gay, and grandson of Peter and Elizabeth (Hayes) 
Gay. 

Peter Gav (grandfather) was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania. 
He started with his father and two brothers, William and Joseph, to emigrate 
to Indiana county, but in their westward journey, when they reached the 
Ligonier valley, Mr. Gay admired the country so much that he remained 
there and engaged in merchandising and stock dealing. He was a prosperous,, 
business man, of broad and liberal views, and was one of the founders of 
the Lutheran church of Donegal and a supporter in all religious causes,, 
although he was not a member of any church. He was a good scholar and 
an accurate surveyor. He was an old line Whig and served as justice of 
the peace for thirty-five years. By his marriage to Elizabeth Hayes, daugh- 
ter of Lewis Hayes, an early settler of the county, five children were born, 
two sons and three daughters, all of whom married and settled in their 
native county. 

Willliam B. Gay (father) was born September 3, 1815. He followed 
throughout his active career the quiet but useful calling of agriculture, front 
which he derived a goodly livelihood. He served his township as justice 
of the peace for fifteen years, fulfilling his duties to the satisfaction of all 
concerned. In his political belief he was a Jeffersonian Democrat. He mar- 
ried, in Alarch, 1835, Martha Spear, a daughter of William Spear, nf I'nion- 
town, Pennsylvania. Mr. Gay died April 4, 1864; he was survived many 
years by his wife, who died January 7, 1883. 

Freeman C. Gay, son of William B. and Alartha (Spear) Gay, acquired 
a liberal erlucation in the common schools, Stahlstown Normal school and 
Sewickley Academy. The first years of his active life were spent on the 
farm, and in 1865 he engaged in merchandising, continuing the same until 
1873. He entered into partnership with Edward H. Bair in 1884, and they 
were engaged in a very successful business up to the time of Mr. Gay's 
death. The firm represented the German-American, Liberty, Niagara, Orient, 
Girard, L'nion, German Travelers, and Home Insurance Companies of the 
L'nited States. The North-British, Lancashire and London, and Lancashire 
Companies of Europe, and the Fidelity Plate Glass Company. .At the age 



76 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

of twenty-three years Mr. Gay enlisted in Company K, Eleventli Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, was appointed corporal, and in 1862 promoted to 
second' lieutenant. He participated in all the battles in which his regiment 
was engaged until the first day's fight at Gettysburg, where he was wounded 
and taken prisoner by the Confederates. He was one of the one hundred 
and nine men who escaped through the rose tunnel, and likewise was among 
those unfortunates who were recaptured. After twenty months in various 
southern prisons, where he suffered untold agony in mind and body, he was 
paroled March i, 1865. For five years he served as superintendent of the 
County Home. He was an adherent of the principles of Democracy. He 
married. March 30, 1865, Harriet Louise Jones, who was born in Jonesville, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, January 31, 1846, a daughter of Robert 
and Sarah (Hubbs) Jones. Their children are: Elizabeth, Charles, and 
James. 

DAVID SHAW ATKINSON is descended from Scotch-Irish an- 
cestry. His grandfather came to America and settled in Maryland more 
than a century ago. He is a son of Thomas Atkinson, who resided in Mount 
Pleasant, and who was married to Elizalaeth Shavy. Of his ancestry on his 
mother's side, David Shaw was in the Revolutionary war and was engaged 
at Hannastown in 1782, and in the Indian conflicts of that age. From this 
ancestry Mr. Atkinson took his name. He was educated in Mount Pleasant 
College, where he spent four years, read law with Hon. James A. Hunter 
and was admitted to the bar in 1868. Shortly after his admission he was 
associated in business with T. J. Weddell, Esc|., and afterward with Hon. 
J. R. McAfee, and still later with John M. Peoples, Esq. At present he is 
in partnership with William C. Peoples, Esq. He has also, almost since his 
admission to the bar, been one of the owners and editors of the Tribune- 
Herald, a daily and weekly paper still published in Greensburg. He has 
not, however, allowed the newspaper business to in any way conflict with 
the practice of the law, to which he has given his steady and undivided at- 
tention for thirty-five years, and in which he has achieved abundant success. 
No better indication of his standing at the bar can be given than this : ''That 
when upon the death of Hon. H. P. Laird a few years ago, it became the 
duty of the Westmoreland Law Association to elect a new president, there 
were no two opinions in the association as to whom this honor should be 
given," Mr. .Atkinson was unanimously elected and has since been re-elected 
each year. 

His firm has always conducted a large general legal business, the court 
business falling mainly upon him. While not by any means a weak man in 
any branch of his profession, he is doubtless at his best in the trial of a 
case or in an argument before a jury; his flow of language, his quick per- 
ception of the strong points of a case, and his majestic delivery which almost 
approximates that of the old-time orator make him a most I formidable op- 
ponent in any case. He has in the last twenty years been senior counsel in 
more than forty homicide cases in this and other counties, and has always 
conducted them with great skill. He has also been concerned in and has 
successfully conducted a very large number of the most important cases, 
involving the payment of large sums of money, tried in the civil courts of 
Westmoreland county. Aside from his law practice he has been eneaged 
somewhat in banking and other business, but not so as to interfere with his 
profession. He has been a Republicati and has made stump speeches in 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAXD COUNTY. 



7T 



every section of the county, in other parts of Pennsylvania and in the western 
states, yet, Hke few lawyers, he has steadily refused political preferment. 
Time and again has a nomination which was almost equivalent to an election 
been offered him for high positions, but in each instance he has positively 
declined. There is no doubt that he could have been in congress or on the 
bench years ago, had he consented to become a candidate. His friends have 
reason to believe and hope that he has yet before him many years of pro- 
fessional usefulness. 

ALEXANDER EICHER, deceased, for many years an attorney of 
Greensburg, Pennsylvania, was born November 24, 185 1, in the village of what 
is now known as Old New Stanton, in Hempfield townshii), Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania. His great-grandfather, Abraham Eicher, 'was born in 
the neighborhood of the river Rhine, in France, and he was of German and 
French extraction. He was a tailor by trade. He settled at Hagerstown, 
Maryland, and from there moved to Ligonier, Westmoreland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, accompanied by his wife, Elizabeth Sophia (Golden) Eicher, and' a 
large family which she bore him. Among their children was a son, Jacob- 
Eicher, (grandfather) who was born in Hagerstown, Maryland, in 1800. He 
was a millwright, a miller and carpenter, and a devout member of the Baptist 
church, being an elder therein for years. He married Sallie Slonecker, a lady 
of rare intelligence, daughter of John Slonecker. Among their children was a 
son, John Slonecker Eicher. In 1855 Jacob Eicher and his wife moved to- 
Washington cunty, Iowa, and were there buried. 

John Slonecker Eicher (father) was born July 25, 1823, in Pleasant 
Unity, Unity township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. His educational 
advantages were very limited, and although he had no trade or profession, was a 
very handy man, and for many year« was known as the best auctioneer in the 
county. Prior to the Civil war he served as fifer for five or ten vears in the 
state militia. In his day he was a factor of considerable importance in the 
Democratic party, and held the office of treasurer of Westmoreland countv dur- 
ing the years 1869-70. He is a Campbellite in religion. Although advanced 
to four score and two years, he is possessed of his powers of body and mind to- 
a good degree, and is spoken of by many as the very soul of honor and manli- 
ness, a gentleman of the old style type, but ready to accept the best brought 
forth by modern civilization. He is a man of decided, deep convictions, and has 
yet to forsake a friend who has aided him, though others talk ill of him. He 
married Mary Pool, born May 20, 1833, in Hempfield township, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, just below the village of New Stanton, daughter of John 
Pool and his wife. Betsey (Houser) Pool, who was one of a family of eight- 
daughters and no sons. John Pool was a son of Samuel Pool, Jr., and brother 
of the mother of the Venerable Harrison Null, of Greensburg, Pennsvlvania. 
Samuel Pool, Jr., was a .son of Samuel Pool, the founder of the Pool family in 
Westmoreland county. Mrs. John S. Eicher died Februarv 14. 1861. In 1856 
Mr. Eicher moved to Washington county, Iowa, but after a residence of twenty 
months there returned to Pennsylvania. He and his wife were the parents of 
three children: .Alexander, born November 24, 1851, mentioned hereafter; 
John P.. born September 30, 1853, and Jacob, born December 29, 1858. 

-Alexander Eicher attended the common schools of Hempfield township 
untd twelve years of age. He then entered the country store of his maternal 
uncle. C. H. Pool, in Pennsville. Bullskin township, Favette county, and re- 
mained there two years. The following five years he clerked in a general store 
m Pennstadt, now Penn borough, Westmoreland countv, the projirietors thereof 



y8 HISTORY OF Jl'ESTMORELAND COUXTY. 

being J. F. & D. Landis. In 1870 he was appointed deputy in the register and 
recorder's office of Westmoreland county, continuing for six years, three under 
Clark F. Warden and three under John M. Laird. On January 10, 1876, he en- 
tered the law office of Archie A. Stewart, in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, as a 
clerk, but with the object of becoming a lawyer, and he was engaged in that 
office up to his decease, September 2^, 1905. He was admitted to the bar July 
30, 1880, and built up a large practice. He was engaged in a nunilxT of noted 
trials, among which was the Painter case, the Ritenour case, and the B. F. 
Rynd case, which gave him an excellent opportunity to display the legal talent 
he so abundantly possessed. He was a Democrat in politics, and while a strict 
partisan enjoyed' the respect of the members of the opposition party. He joined 
the Christian church in the early eighties, and was actively connected with the 
A. O. U. W., R. A., and N. U. His friends were not confined to the limits of 
Westmoreland county, but were to be found all over the state. He was ex- 
tremely kind-hearted and generous, possessed a fund of humor and jokes, with 
which he could entertain an audience, and therefore was popular and in much 
•demand at social gatherings and dinners. 

Mr. Richer married, at Greensburg, Pennsylvania, October 4, 1873, Ella M. 
McClelland, daughter of Archibald and Mary (Funk) McClelland, the former 
named having been a native of Ireland, a contractor and builder. Her death 
■occurred in the spring of 1898. Their children were: Clark Warden, born 
June 17, 1874, attended the schools of Greensburg, and Washington & Jeffer- 
.son College, at Washington, was a member of Company I, Tenth Pennsyl- 
vania Regiment, and served in the Philippines during the Spanish-American 
war. He is a lawyer, a member of the Westmoreland county bar, and practiced 
with his father under the firm name of Eicher & Richer. He married Sarah 
Glunt, of Greensburg. Alexander, Jr., born April 24, 1878, also attended the 
schools of Greensburg and Washington and Jefferson College, of which latter 
institution he was a member of the famous football team, and in 1898 was 
•elected captain, but went to the war before the season opened. He graduated 
at the head of his class in Greensburg high school, and stood among the first 
of his class at college in his junior year. He served during the entire period of 
the Spanish-American war as a member of Company I, Tenth Pennsylvania 
Regiment, and during this time was never on the sick list. He is also a lawyer, 
a member of the Westmoreland county bar, and engaged in practice with his 
father and brother under the firm name of Eicher & Eicher. He married 
Winona Gallagher, who resided in the vicinity of Uniontown. Mary McClel- 
land, born August 25, 1880. became the wife of J. Ed. Stevenson, of Greensburg. 
Elinor McClelland, born March 16, 1882, became the wife of Robert C. Jones, 
of Boston, Massachusetts. Romayne McClelland, born June 29, 1883. John 
S., born November 23, 1884. Archibald, born May 23, il 



BRENISER FAMILY. The numerous and well known family of 
which Harrv R. Breniser, of Ligonier, is a member, has been for at least a 
century identified with Westmoreland county. Peter Breniser, so far as is 
known, spent his entire life as a farmer in Derry township. His children were : 
Abram, Peter, Jacob, mentioned hereafter ; Barbara, married Tobias Kimmell ; 
Susan, married Cyrus Cavin ; and Christopher, a merchant at Hillside. 

Jacob Breniser, son of Peter Breniser, was born in 1819, in Derrv township, 
and "during his early manhood was a farmer and stock drover. In 1850 he 
moved to the Ligonier valley and settled about two miles north of Ligonier vil- 
lage. He subsequently moved to the borough, where he engaged in mercantile 



HISTORY OF JVESTMORELJXD COUXTY. 79 

business during tlie remainder of his life. He married Sarah Hargnett, aiW 
they had children: John, Albert, Peter, mentioned hereafter; Susan, wife of 
Jolin lohnson: Catherine, married J. O. A. Blair; Nettie, wife of William 
Thomas : Sarah, wife of S. S. Dice ; and Ida, married Charles Bassart. 

Peter Breniser, son of Jacob and Sarah (Hargnett) Breniser, was born 
April 12, 1851, in Ligonier township, and until he was twenty-five years of age 
remained with his father on the homestead. He then married and began 
farming for himself on the home farm. In 1881 he moved to Ligonier borough 
and established what is now known as the National Hotel, of which he was 
proprietor for two years. He then went to Greensburg, where for six years he 
was proprietor of the Zimmerman House. Thence he removed to Dubois and 
for two vears and a half conducted the National Hotel, after which he returned 
to the Ligonier valley and for a brief period resumed the life of a farmer. In 
1900 he built the Ho'tel Breniser, at Ligonier, which he successfully conducted 
for a time, and then transferred the management to his son, Harry R. Breniser. 
]\Ir. Breniser married, October, 1876, Hulda J., daughter of Jesse Ramsey, 
and thev have three children: May, a graduate of DufT's Business College, 
Pittsburg, now manager of D. H. Tollman's loan office ; Harry R., mentioned 
hereafter ; and Hargnett, at home. 

Harry R. Breniser, son of Peter and Hulda J. (Ramsey) Breniser.was born 
November 5, 1879, at the Breniser homestead, and was educated at the Iron City 
College, Pittsburg, from which institution he graduated. He is now the success- 
ful proprietor ofthe Hotel Breniser, which is in all respects the most modern 
establishment of the kind in the Ligonier valley. He is a Republican in politics, 
member of Ligonier Lodge, No. 331, A. F. and A. M., Greensburg Chapter, 
R. A. AL, K. T., and Latrobe Lodge No. 907, B. P. O. E. Harry R. Breniser 
married, March 9, 1906, Mary I. Grove, a resident of Ligonier, and sister of 
Dr. W. W. Grove, of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and Dr. J. O. Grove, of Braden- 
ville, Pennsylvania. 

JOHN NEVIN McCONNELL. for some years the enterprising 
representative of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, at Greensburg, Penn- 
sylvania, was born June 22, 1876, at Salina, Westmoreland county, the son of 
Yeakle Xenophon and Rachel (Yockey) McConnell. This McConnell family 
came from the north of Ireland, but were of Scotch descent. The paternal an- 
cestor in this country married a pure Celt, and settled in Baltimore, Maryland, 
where he was a professor of Hebrew in an institute of learning that was active 
in the work of the Reformed church. Jacob Shearer, of Germany, was the 
maternal ancestor. His wife was Christina De Hoff, from Alsace, a French 
province. They settled in York county, Pennsylvania, near the Maryland' line. 

Samuel ]\IcConnell, son of the paternal ancestor in the L^nited States, was 
born in Baltimore, Maryland. His wife was Catherine (Shearer) McConnell, 
the daughter of Jacob and Christina Shearer. She was a native of York county, 
Pennsylvania. Among their children was : 

Rev. John ^IcConnell. born in York county, Pennsylvania, June 24, 1823, 
is still living, and is the grandfather of John Nevin McConnell. In March, 
1847, as a volunteer member of Company "D," from the District of Colunibia, 
Maryland, in the Mexican war service, he sailed from Baltimore for Vera Cruz 
in May, returning in August, 1848, when he was licensed to preach by the West- 
moreland classis of the Reformed church at Ligonier. Pennsylvania, 
November 10, 1853, and was ordained to the ministn.- by Miami classis at Day- 
ton, Ohio, July 25, 1855. He remained active in the work until a few years ago. 



8o HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTV. 



since which time he has Hved a retired life. Rachel (Humberion) McCon- 
nell, wife of Rev. John McConneli, was born in l'"rostburg, Maryland, August, 
1827. Her father was born in Maryland, but his father came from France,, 
while the mother came from England. Her mother (nee Lohr) was born 
in jMaryland, in 1795. The Lohrs came from Germany to Maryland. 

Yeakle Xenophon McConneli, father of John Nevin McConneli, was born 
at Frostburg. Allegheny county, Maryland, June 4, 1853, coming to Westmore- 
land county in the early "seventies." He spent soine time in the west, princi- 
pally at Corydon, Indiana. When about sixteen years of age he began teach- 
ing school. From i8yo to 1893 he served as deputy sheriff of Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, under Lucian Clawson. At present he is employed by 
the Keystone Coal Company, at Salina, Pennsylvania. Politically he is a 
stanch Democrat, and in religious faith an adherent to the creed of the Reformed 
church. Rachel (Yockey) McConneli, mother of John N. McConneli, was 
born at Salina, Westmoreland county, Penn.sylvania, May 17, 1855. Her 
father, Simon Peter Yockey, was born at Perrysville, Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, February, 1820. His parents, Christopher and Mary (Bash) 
Yockey, came direct from Germany to Westmoreland county. Mr. McCon- 
nell's maternal grandmother, Eliza K. Yockey, whose maiden name was 
Whitesell, was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, about 1822. Her 
parents, John and Mary K. (Clawson) Whitesell, were born in the same 
county. Mary K. Clawson's parents came direct from Holland to Westmore- 
land county. Her ancestors played an important part in the early history of 
this county, fighting Indians, and fled from what is now Bell township to 
Hannastown for protection. Some were scalped and tortured in various ways. 
The family were 'of the German Reformed church. 

J. Nevin McConneli received his education in the common schools of 
Westmoreland county, and in his youthful days was not a stranger to hard 
manual labor. Having an ambition to accomplish more in life's conflict than 
seemed possible in the role he was then following, he by hard study at night 
time in a few years became competent to fill a higher sphere, and in 1900 asso- 
ciated himself with the well known Equitable Life Assurance Company, whose 
business he managed at Greensburg up until 1906. In the early part of 1905 
he became interested in coal lands and fire clay deposits, developing and market- 
ing the same. Like most of his ancestors he is a member of the Reformed 
church, and during 1904 was the superintendent of its Sunday school. He is a 
member of the F. and A. M., Shidle Lodge, No. 601, at Irwin, Pennsylvania. 
He married, October 26, 1898, Gertrude M. Wise, daughter of Simon and 
Amanda (Blank) Wise. She received her education from the Greensburg high 
schools and Greensburg Seminary. She passed from the scenes of earth March 
7, 1903. Her ancestors were prominently connected with Revolutionary and 
Civil war events. Among these are Major John I. Krebs (Revolutionary) and 
Captain George A. Krebs (Civil war). Her pateranl grandfather was William 
Wise, a native of Westmoreland county, born 1812. His wife, Lydia Wise, was 
born in the same county in 1813. Their parents settled in this county soon 
after coming from Germany. Her maternal grandfather was Henry Blank, 
born in Westmoreland county, in 1829, and now living at Greensburg. Penn- 
sylvania. His wife was Louise Krebs, (now spelled Cribbs) born in West- 
moreland county, about 1833, and still survives. The ancestors on both sides, 
with a few exceptions, came from Germany, and those who were not Germans 
came from France and Holland. To Mr. and Mrs. McConneli was born one 
son, Glenn Withrow, born at Irwin, Pennsylvania, December 12, 1900. 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 8i 



HARRY FRAXKLIX THOMAS, druggist at Greensburg, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, an enterprising and prudent business factor of 
the town, and whose place is located on Pennsylvania avenue, is the grandson 
of John Thomas and Catherine (Weaver) Thomas. The date of his birth was 
December i8, 1859, in Hempfield township, Westmoreland county, Pennsyl- 
vania. The great-grandfather on the paternal side was Barnett Thomas, of 
the same township and county. He married and reared a family of nine chil- 
dren, including: John, George, Xathan, Henry, Barnett, Molly, Betsy, and 
Mary. Barnett Thomas, father of these children, was a lifelong farmer. 

John Thomas, eldest son of Barnett Thomas, was a native of Hempfield 
township, \\'cstmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and lived to the advanced age 
of eighty-six years. He married Catherine \\'eaver, a native of Westmoreland 
county, and died in Hempfield township, aged eighty-four years. Their chil- 
dren were: i. Jemima: 2. Xathaniel. who when less than twenty years of age 
enlisted in the Mexican war and died from sickness and an accident while on 
the march, having been in all the engagements encountered by his command, 
but the last one of the war. He died aged twenty-two years ; 3 and 4. Barnett 
and Cyrus (twins); 5. Sibella, now the widow of John Stark; 6. John, Jr.; 
7. Jacob : 8. Abraham W. Three of these sons served in Pennsylvania regi- 
ments during the civil war — Cyrus, a major, died of pneumonia, aged sixty- 
eight years : Abraham and Jacob, the latter died. 

John Thomas, Jr., son of John Thomas, Sr., was born in Hempfield town- 
ship, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, February 9, 1834, and for nearly 
half a century has been a horse farrier and veterinary. He married Susan 
Henry, and their children were : Emma, deceased ; Harry F. ; Ida, deceased, 
wife of Richard Cribbs : Alice, wife of James Gilliland ; Mame, wife of George 
Kimmel : and Lizzie, single. 

Harry F., son of John, Jr., after obtaining a good common school edu- 
cation, attended the Pharmacy College at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1884 and 
1885. He then clerked for Will Brown, a Greensburg druggist for about 
thirteen years (having been in his store prior to going to college) and then in 
1895, engaged in the drug trade, which he still follows. Politically he is a Re- 
publican. He is a devout member and deacon of the Reformed church, and has 
been a financial secretary and trustee of the church cemetery association. He 
married X'annie A. Jones, daughter of Phebe Jones. The father is deceased. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas have been born four sons: John E., born Julv 19, 
1887; Paul L., born November 13, 1889; Henry F., Jr., born March 28, 1894; 
Howard J., born X^'ovember 5, 1897, all still living at home. 

JOHX FRAXKLIX^ GOODLIX', a grocer, doing a prosperous retail 
trade at Xos. 213 and 215 West Newton avenue, Greensburg, Pennsylvania, 
was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, September 29, 1870. 

(T) His great-grandfather was James Goodlin, who married (first) 
Catharine Snyder. They located in Greensburg and conducted a hotel which 
stood where now stands the "Fisher House." Among the children born by 
their marriage was Henry A. Goodlin, the grandfather of John F. Goodlin. 
By James Goodlin's second marriage there was born to him among other chil- 
dren a son who was killed in the civil war. 

(II) Henry A. Goodlin, son of pioneer James Goodlin and his wife 
Catharine, was born February 13, 1824, near Harrold's church, where he still 
resides, aged eighty-two years. He married Hannah Baker, daughter of 
George and Eve Baker. At an early day George Baker was a cabinet maker and 



82 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTV. 

furnished all the coffins for the county home. Hannah (Baker) Goodlin died 
in 1863. Henry A. Goodin married (second) ]\Iary Harrold, daughter of 
George Harrold and wife. The children by the former marriage were : Will- 
iam George Washington, born February 22, 1851 ; Frank i\, born 1852; 
Amanda, wife of Abraham Altman ; Mary A., wife of Henry A. Wentzel ; John 
H., and one daughter who died in infancy. By the second marriage Henrv A. 
Goodlin was the father of Elmer A., George H., Emma, wife of Arthur 
Keener. 

(HI) William G. W. Goodlin. father of John F. Goodlin. received a good 
common school education in Hempfield township, and farmed with his father 
imtil 1886, when he was appointed tip-staff in the Westmoreland district court, 
which place he still holds, making a continued service of twenty years. During 
1896 he removed to Greensburg and in the spring of 1905 to his present home 
at No. 219 West Third street. He is a Democrat, and a member of the First 
Reformed church. He married, March 24, 1870, Sevila T., daughter of Philip 
and Margaret (Miller) Wentzel, of Millersdale, Pennsylvania. Their chil- 
dren were: John F., born September 29, 1870, of whom later; James H., born 
April 5, 1872; Sarah A., born May 12, 1874, married Frank O. Boggs ; Olivci 
P., born May 20, 1876; Margaret Jane, born August 18, 1878, married W. H. 
Sawash; William H., born June 9, 1880; Mary L., born October 20, 1882; 
Lilly A., born December 9, 1884, wife of Harry Schaff; Laura Pearl, born' 
March 25, 1888; Lucian W. Doty, born February 15, 1890, died December 9, 
1902. The living children all reside in Greensburg, except Mrs. Boggs, who 
resides in Jeannette, a suburb town. 

(IV) John Franklin Goodlin, after receiving a good education, tauglit 
for several years in the schools of Westmoreland county and then clerked lor 
W. F. Scheibler in his general store on "Bunker Hill"' for three years. Sub- 
sequently he engaged in trade with his father-in-law and brother-in-law, H. K. 
and J. G. Myers, at Jeannette. He sold out there and embarked in the grocery 
trade m Greensburg with his brother, James H., and now operates at Nos. 215 
and 215 West Newton avenue. Mr. Goodlin married, when about twenty-on't, 
years of age, Sarah Henry, of Middletown. Thev have two children- Clark 
Oliver, born May i. 1894. and Olive Margaret, born December 29, 1896. Mr 
Goodlin IS a Republican in his political views, believing tliat party but serves 
the interests of the masses of American citizens. Both he and his wife are 
members of the First Reformed church. He is a member of Golden Ea-le 
Lodge and the Protected Home Circle. * 

EDWARD JOHN PERRY. As incumbent of the office of burcress 
of Greensburg and as one of the representative citizens of Westmorefand 
county Mr. Perry is consistently accorded recognition in this compilation 
whie It may be stated that he is one of the leading undertakers and florists' 
of the attractive capital city of the county. 

Edward John Perry is a native of the old Keystone state where the 
family was founded several generations ago. He was born in Lewisville 
-Chester county, Pennsylvania, March 18, 1864. and is a son of Samuel C 
and Mary Ellen (Stem Perry, of whose eight children six are living namelv • 

m'"'^' ''7^,?4-^''"'r' ^^<=C^"1^>/ *l^o resides in the northeastern part of 
Maryland: William T., a successful druggist in Chester, Pennsvlvania • Ed- 
ward J., of whom later ; Albert Cloud, engag-ed in the grocerv business in 
the aty of Philadelphia ; George Elliott, identified with the same So en- 
terprise m the same city ; and Anna, wife of Albert McCauley, superintendent 



HISTORY OF JVESTMORRLAXD COUXTV. 83 

of the Denver paper mills in the city of Denver, Colorado. Samuel C. Perry 
was born Januarv 17, 1828, and the major part of his life was passed in 
Chester countv. In his youth he learned the carpenter's trade, and his active 
career was devoted to contracting and building, in which he was fairly suc- 
cessful, being a man of integrity and reliability. He died August 31, 1883, 
at the age oi fiftv-four years. In politics he was a stalwart advocate of the 
principles and policies of the Democratic party, and both he and his wife 
were prominent and devoted members of the Methodist Episcopa| church, 
while for many vears he was a member of the board of trustees of St. John's 
Church, in LeWisville. In a fraternal way he was identified with the I. O. 
O. F. and the K. P., while in all the relations of life he commanded the con- 
fidence and esteem of those with whom he came in contact. His wife is Mary 
Ellen Perrv, nee Stern, of Denver, Colorado. 

Edward J. Perry passed his boyhood days in his native town, in whose 
public schools he secured his early educational training, though his school 
work was of very irregular order after he had attained the age of ten years, 
since he then began to depend upon his own resources to a very large extent. 
He secured employment on a neighboring farm, remaining with the one 
emplover for six \ears. within which time he attended school as ojjportunity 
presented, and he remained two years with another farmer of Cecil county, 
Marvland. At the age of eighteen years he secured a position in the estab- 
lishment of a leading undertaker and florist of Westgrove. Chester county, 
where he secured his initial experience in the line of enterprise with which 
he is now so successfully identified. He remained connected with this estab- 
lishment for a period of four and one-half years, within which time he had 
thoroughlv familiarized himself with all details of the business. In 1887 
he associated himself with Ellsworth Burtis. and engaged in the undertaking 
business at Mount Holly, New Jersey, where the enterprise was conducted 
about two years, under the firm name of Burtis & Perry. He then disposed 
of his interests and shortly afterward removed to the city of Pittsburg, where 
he was employed about eighteen months, at the expiration of which, in 1890, 
he came to Greensburg, where he has ever since maintained his home and 
where he has become numbered among our rej^resentative business men. For 
four and one-half years he was here employed by Samuel N. Shields, under- 
taker, and June 17. 1895, he engaged in business for himself as a funeral 
director, while in 1 90 1 he added to his undertaking business the florist de- 
partment, while his equipments and accessories are of the best and his estab- 
lishment one of the leading concerns of the sort in the county. 

In politics Mr. Perry accords a stanch allegiance to the Democratic party, 
and has been an active worker in its cause for a number of years past. He 
was a member of the Democratic county committee for several terms as a 
representative of the Fourth ward in the city of Greensburg, and in Feb- 
ruary. 1903. was signallv honored in being elected to his present responsible 
poition as burgess for a term of three years, his election, furthermore, in- 
dicating the high regard in which he is held in the community. In a fraternal 
way Mr. Perry is affiliated with the following orders : Greensburg Lodge. 
No. 511. P.. P. (). E. : Greensburg Castle, No. 366, K. G. E. : Greensburg 
Tent. No. 214, K. ^1.; Westmoreland Lodge, No. 840, I. O. O. F. ; Aerie 
No. 577. F. O. E. : Westmoreland Camp, No. 18, \V. of W. : the Grand Fra- 
ternity and the Homeless, No. 26. He is secretary of the Westmoreland 
County Funeral Directors' Association, and a member of the board of tru.siees 
of Thiel College. Fle has also been identifierl with the Greensburg fire de- 



84 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

partmcnt for fourteen years, in which time he has liUed all of the various 
offices in the company, as well as being captain for six years ; is a member 
of the Pennsylvania State Firemen's Association, and also served one term as 
president of the Western Pennsylvania Firemans' Association, which comprises 
thirty-six counties, as well as being on the executive board since 1898. Mr. 
Perry married, January 6, 1897, Margaret J. Horty, daughter of James Horty, 
of West Grove, Chester county, Pennsylvania, where she was born and reared, 
and seven children were born, one of whom died in infancy. The names of 
the surviving children are: Fred B., Paul R., Edward J., Jr., Richard M., 
Kenneth C. and Elizabeth C. He and his wife are prominent members of the 
First Lutheran church, he having filled the office of deacon for the past six 
years. 

GUSTAVUS ADOLPHUS WINEMAN, of the firm of Wineman 
& Getty, dealers in furniture and musical instruments, of Greensburg, Penn- 
sylvania, ranks among the thrifty business men of the city. He was born 
near the present site of Youngwood, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
June 2, 1871, the son of Andrew and Catherine C. (Rugh) Wineman. 

I. The American ancestor of this family was John George Wineman, 
a native of Germany, coming from Muenchingcn, Wuertenberg, with his wife, 
Anna Catherine (Laundmesser) Wineman, and children: Barbara, Jacob, 
Regena. George, Andrew, mentioned hereafter. After coming to this country 
the children born were John and Mary. The family came from their German 
home across the sea in the ship "Columbia" ; they sailed from Amsterdam 
July 14, 1831, and landed at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The ancestor, John 
George, was born in 1790, and died, aged ninety-three years, in 1883. The 
wife of the paternal ancestor came from those of high official position in 
Germany. They were both strict, devout Lutherans. They settled near 
Greensburg, Pennsylvania, in Hempfield township, on land bought at eighteen 
dollars per acre. It is still in possession of the family, a spot sacred to every 
member of the generations descending from them. 

n. .\ndrew Wineman, son of John George and Anna Catherine Wine- 
man, was born at Muenchingen, canton of Ledberg, in the kingdom of 
Wuertenberg, Germany, November 11, 1830. He was less than a year old 
at the date of his parents coming to America. He received a good common 
school education in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and followed the 
cabinet-making business for a few years at New Stanton, Pennsylvania, but 
subsequently settled on the old farm, tilled the soil, raised, bought and sold 
stock, especially horses for the eastern city markets. He was a strict Lu- 
theran, and early became a member of the old Harrolds church, of which 
he was for many years an officer and very active worker. He also founded 
the Youngwood Lutheran church in 1901. Politically he was a stanch Re- 
publican. Mr. Wineman married, when about twenty-nine years of age, 
Catherine Caroline Rugh, whose parents, Peter and Elizabeth Rugh, resided 
where "Hufftown" now stands, a part of Greensburg. She was born August 
12, 1839. The children by that imion are: Anna Margaret, married; Eliza- 
beth Amanda, married ; Mary Jane, single ; Jacob Ezra, married : Gustavus 
Adolphus, married ; Charlotte Agnes, married ; William Henry, married : a 
college graduate : and George Franklin, single. Andrew Wineman, father of 
these children, died February 14, 1904, and his good wife, so long his life 
companion, still lives on the old Wineman homestead, beloved by all. 

Of the Rugh family it may here be stated that their ancestor came to 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 85 

this country about 16S0, settling in eastern Pennsylvania. His name was 
]\lichael Ru'gh. A member of the family went over the Allegheny mountains, 
settlino- in what is now Westmoreland county. In the acts of the assembly, 
September 17, 1785, it is recorded: "Whereas, the Seat of Justice for the 
countv of Westmoreland hath not been heretofore established by law, etc., 
etc., it was enacted by the freemen of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 
that five trustees be appointed to purchase a piece of land in trust for use 
of the inhabitants of \Vestmoreland county. Provided : That said piece of 
land be not situated farther east than "nine mile run," nor farther west than 
"Brushv Run,'' or farther north than Loyalhanna, nor farther south than 
five miles south of the old Pennsylvania road, leading to Pittsburg, on which 
ground said courthouse and prison." The trustees appointed to act were: 
Benjamin Davis, Alichael Rugh, John Shields, John Pomeroy, and Hugh 
]^Iartin. ?\Iichael Rugh owned the land where now stands the steel works 
and the borough of Hufftown. Jacob Rugh was 2ilichael Rugh's son, and 
the father of Peter Rugh, whose daughter Caroline intermarried with the 
\Mnemans. 

HI. Gustavus Adolphus Wineman, son of Andrew Wineman, received 
a good common school education in the schools of Hempfield township, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, and then learned the carpenter's and build- 
ers' trade, following that and contracting until 1902, when he in company 
with H. M. Zundell purchased the furniture business of C. T. Barnhart, 
who had operated it a quarter of a century. Politically Mr. Wineman is a 
Republican, and in religious matters, like his forefathers, adheres to the 
Lutheran church. He first held membership in Harrolds church, but after 
his marriage united with the First Lutheran Church of Geensburg, of which 
his wife is also a member, though formerly a Presbyterian. JMr. Wineman 
was a member of the borough council for four years at South West Greens- 
burg, and for the past three years has been president of the school board. 
He was among the first to build in that borough, erecting several residences 
which materially aided in the growth and development of the place. In 1905 
he in company with George S. Getty, purchased the Greensburg Trading 
Company business, wherein is carried a full line of furniture and household 
supplies and musical instruments, selling his interest in the furniture estab- 
lishment of \\'incman & Zundel. 

]\Ir. \\'inenian married, December 30, 1896, Mary J. Bierer, of Cedar- 
ville, ^'irginia, daughter of J. M. and Susan (Painter) Bierer. She was 
born near Greensburg. November 23, 1871, Her father's family were prom- 
inent in the service of the Union army in Civil war days, volunteering as 
soldiers at Latrobe. Mr. and Mrs. Wineman are the parents of three chil- 
dren : Grace \'irginia, John Bierer, and ]\Iary Caroline. 

In conclusion it should be stated that everv old citizen around Greens- 
burg well remembers the eventful, though quiet and reserved life of John 
George ^\■ineman, the grandfather of Gustavus A, Wineman, who built up 
both state and church by an honest, exemplary life. Also the late Andrew 
Wineman, father of Gustavus A. Wineman, who bore well his part in making 
the surrouuflings of Greensburg what tliev are in a number of ways. Gus- 
tavus A. Wineman is taking up the duties laid down by both father and 
grandfather. 

FOIGHT FAMILY. John George Foight. the first ancestor of 
the family in America, was a son of George Jacol) Foight, of Twinsbaugh, 



86 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

Brockenheim county, Wurtemberg kingdom, Germany. He was born No- 
vember 19, 1800. He served an apprenticeship with a boot and shoe maker 
in his native village and learned that trade. In the year 1823 he embarked 
on a sailing vessel bound for America. It is not known from what port in 
the Fatherland he sailed, but by reason of contrary winds his voyage lasted 
eighty days. He and his fellow wayfarers suffered some hardships from 
their long cruise, as the good ship's commissary was exhausted of everv- 
thing but salt meats before reaching this side of the Atlantic. He settled 
in Pittsburg, where he began to work at his trade as a journeyman. Some- 
time later he married Eliza Berlin Wooster, widow of Charles Wooster. This 
Widow Wooster was before this time the widow of one Pinkerton, so that 
she had already outlived two husbands, and after her marriage with her 
third husband her maternal instincts went out to three lines of children. In 
1832 John George Foight removed with his family to Murrysville, West- 
moreland county, where he purchased a tract of twenty acres of land, erected 
a log house and shop, set up as a master in his trade and followed it until 
a few years before his death. The military sjiirit ran high in him and he 
was a member of a vohmteer militia company called the "Franklin Blues." He 
died December 31, 1872. 

George Jacob, his father, according to a translation of some old German 
papers brought to this country and still in the possession of the family, was 
an attache of the Court at Wurtemberg. When a mere lad John George 
Foight saw Napoleon's army as it crossed Germany in the campaign against 
Russia. This pageant was stamped upon his youthful mind and he frequently 
related it to his family with much pride. It is quite probable that the spell- 
ing and pronunciation of the surname of John George Foight, either b\- ac- 
cident or design, was changed after he came to America. The German spell- 
ing of the name, as attested by Germans of his time and acquaintance, was 
"\^jight" instead of "Foight,"' and the pronunciation accordingly. It was 
a rather common occurrence among people of the German nationality coming 
to this country in the early days to endeavor to Anglicise their names. This 
early custom is revealed by the old legal records of the county. 

Eliza Berlin, wife of the American ancestor of the Foight family, was 
the daughter of Jacob Berlin. She was born at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
in 1800. With her parents she crossed the mountains in 1810 and settled 
in Pittsburg. During the journey a night was spent at Fort Ligonier, where 
a guard had to be posted to keep wolves away from the horses and camp. 
The old Foight homestead was on the line of the northern turnpike, which 
before the building of the Pennsylvania railroad, was one of the main thor- 
oughfares between Pittsburg and Philadelphia. In her day Eliza Berlin 
Foight was famous for the cakes she made and for a beverage called "spruce 
beer," which she supplied to travelers on the pike. She and her husband 
first attended Denmark Manor Reformed church, where now repose their 
remains. This church was about five miles from where thev lived, and before 
they possessed a horse they traveled to the church afoot. In the latter vears 
of their lives a Methodist Episcopal church was estalilished at :\rurrvsville 
and they united with it. When a small girl Mrs. Foight was among the com- 
pany who welcomed Marquis LaFayette upon his visit from France to the 
United States. She many times spoke to her friends in later vears of the 
warm welcome extended "by the people to the famous general upon that oc- 
casion. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. John George Foight were: Sam- 
uel Berlin, horn in 1837, educated in the common schools, after which he was 



" HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 87 

apprenticed as a compositor. After mastering the printer's trade he worked 
at the case on the Pittsburg Gazette (now Commercial Gazette) and became 
foreman of the composing room. He was married to Margaret Remaley. 
He died of a fever in December, 1871, leaving two sons, Harry S. and Frank 
A., to survive him. Lucinda. married Herman H. Beeson, and shortly after 
her marriage moved with her husband to Columbia City, Whitley county, 
Indiana. Lucinda is now a widow, her children all living near her in Indiana. 
Satiah, married (first) Oliver Purcell, wdio a short time afterwards died in 
Pittsburg, leaving one son. John. Satiah married (second) David Miller, 
and they lived for a time at McKeesport, but now reside near Denmark 
Manor church. John George, of whom later. 

John George Foight. named after his father, was born at Murrysville, 
November 28, 1842. He received a common school education, and by occu- 
pation is a farmer, fruit grower and dairyman. In August, 1864, he enliste' 
in the Two Hundred and Fourth Regiment, Fifth Light Artillery, United 
States \'oIunteers, and served until the close of the war, being mustered out 
of the service July 4, 1865. He was elected a member of the Pennsylvania 
legislature in 1888. He was instrumental in the organization of the First 
National P)ank of Export, of which he is a director. John G. Foight, married, 
in 1867, ^lary Emeline Brinker, a native of Penn township, born in 1847. 
They are both members of the Denmark Manor Reformed church, and polit- 
ically Mr. Foight has always been a Republican. Mary Emeline Brinker was 
a daughter of Josiah and Anna (Kistler) Brinker. Jacob Brinker, her great- 
grandfather, is supposed to have been born in Lancaster count^•, Pennsyl- 
vania. The earliest record of him is his will, recorded Xovember 16, 1798, 
by which instrument it appears he was the father of a large faniih- and 
that he was possessed of about fifteen hundred acres of land, much of it 
located in what was then styled the "Opost Settlement," Franklin township. 
His wife was named Susannah and his children were : George, Jacob, Abra- 
ham, ^largaret, married one Earner; Katren, wife of John Seeley ; Susannah, 
wife of Jacob Barleen. and one daughter (name unknown) who marrieil a 
man named Shaver. Jacob Brinker. her grandfather, lived on the land in- 
herited from his father in Franklin township. It is not known to whom he 
was married. On January 12, 1805, he received a deed from one Coates, an 
attorney for John and Richard Penn, proprietors of Pennsylvania, for three 
hundred and thirty-si.x acres of land in the Manor of Denmark, which land 
his father had purchased from the heirs of Penn, and had given to him by 
his will, but for which the father had never received the deed. His children 
were: Colonel Paul Brinker. Josiah, above named; Esther, married fohn 
Lauffer. of Harrison City; Sarah, wife of Michael Byers, and Lydia, married 
(first) John Kistler. and later, one Fink. Josiah Brinker died in 1888. John. 
Laufifer, mentioned herein, lived to the ripe old age of over a hundred vears. 
The children of John G. and :\Iary E. Foight now living are: Samuel Berlin, 
Paul R., ]\Iary Elizabeth, wife of J. Lo.ean Kemerer; John II., Jesse Brinker 
(named after his grandfather), Annie E., unmarried, at honic"; Harrv W., 
unmarried, at home ; and Charles Curtis, unmarried, at home. 

CHARLES WESLEY BYERLY, who conducts a grocerv and 
queensvvare store in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, is a native of Westmoreland 
county. He was born in East Huntingdon township. Tamiarv 0, 1860, the 
son of John and Harriet ( Suttle) Byeriv. who farmed in" Htmpfield and other 
townships in Westmoreland county. The father died in Greensburg, in Tnlv 



88 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



1894, aged seventy-two years. Their children were Artlisa, died young; 
\\'illiam Irwin, died aged about forty-nine years ; Viola, married Dempster 
Moore, who died in Philadelphia; she died I3ecember, 1903; Margaret, wife 
of Thomas E. Wible, of Greensburg, Pa. ; Martha, died young ; Charles W. ; 
Phebe Ann, married A. O. Jones, of Greensburg, Pa. ; Hattie M., married 
Milton Given, of Greensburg, Pa. 

Charles W. Byerly attended the common schools of his native countv, 
and when a young mair operated his father's farm and a dairy for two years, 
after which he engaged in the grocery and crockery business, which he has 
followed the past eighteen years, commencing about 1887. His place of 
business, on Penn avenue, Greensburg, is one of the model business houses 
of the thriving city. He adheres to the political principles of the Repub- 
lican party. His own business afTairs having fully absorbed his time, he has 
never held public office, except that of school director in Southwest Greens- 
burg borough. He was a member of Comi)any I, Pennsylvania National 
Guard, for five years, holding the office of corporal. He is a member of the 
;\Iethodist Episcopal church of Greensburg, and is comiected with the Wood- 
men of the World, an insurance fraternal order. He married, April 30, 1885, 
Carrie E. Robinson, of Greensburg, Pennsylvania, She is the daughter of 
Daniel and Hannah Robinson. Her father died in 1887. Their children were : 
Nellie, aged twenty years; Marjorie, aged eighteen years; Hannah, aged 
sixteen years ; Henrietta, aged fourteen years : and \lola M., aged seven vears. 

JESSE CLARENCE WELTY is one of the well known and pros- 
perous .farmers of Hempfield township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. 
He is also extensively engaged in dealing in live stock, and is one of the 
influential men of this district. 

John Steiner Welty, father of Jesse Clarence Welty, was a wagon builder 
by trade and carried on a successful business in Frogtown, near Pleasant 
Unity. He was a member of the Reformed church, and a stanch Democrat. 
He married Nancy Kilgore, daughter of Jesse Kilgore, who was one of the 
leading farmers of Hempfield township, and they had eleven children : Eliza- 
beth, died in infancy ; Charles, died in infancy ; Mary, married Murrav Zim- 
merman, son of Henry R. Zimmerman, farmer ancl thresher of Hempfield 
township; Lelah, married Samuel Gordon, of New Alexandria, and has three 
children : Bessie, Ada and Jane ; Margaret, married Harvev Barclav, of Con- 
nellsville, and has two children: Harry and John; John Kilgore, died at the 
age of twenty: Jesse Clarence, of whom later: Richard Steiner, married Kate 
SmHth. daughter of Francis Smith, who is one of the leading farmers of 
Unity township, and has two children, Harry and Mildred; William, died 
in infancy: Robert, died at the age of two years; Bessie, married Ezra W. 
Kepple, who is in the mantel business in Greensburg, Pennsvlvania, and has 
one child, ]\IabeI. 

Jesse^CIarence Welty, third son and seventh child of John Steiner and 
Nancy_ (Kilgore) Welty, was born in Frogtown, near Pleasant Unitv, Penn- 
sylvania, June 23, 1872. He received his education in the common schools 
of the district, and commenced at quite an early age to assist his father on 
the farm, thus gaining practical knowledge of the best means of cultivation. 
Upon attaining manhood he commenced farming operations for himself, which 
has met with unvaried success. In connection with the cultivation of his 
farm, which is a model in its way, he commenced to deal in live stock, and 
now does an extensive business in this direction. He married, Februarv 18, 



HISTORY OF irESTMORELAXD COUNTY. 89 

1897, ^larv Immel, daughter of John and Nancy (Rowe) Immel, of East 
Grecnsburg. Andrew Rowe, maternal grandfather of Mrs. Welty, came from 
Germany "when a boy, settled in Pennsylvania, and married Peggie Hontz. 
Henrv Immel, paternal grandfather of ]\lrs. Welty, was in the meat business 
for a' livelihood. The children of ^h. and Airs. Jesse Clarence Welty are : 
John Franklin, born August 18, 1899; Margaret Nancy, Alarch 23, 190 1 ; 
Jesse Kilgore, March 13, 1903. 

ADAM KELLER BOW]MAN, one of the leading business men of 
\\'estmoreland county and a man prominently and actively identified with com- 
munity affairs, was born in Bell township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
Febru'arv 26, 1854, son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Iline) Bowman. Joseph 
Bowman was born in Bell township in 1825. He was reared on the home farm, 
and on reaching manhood acquired a portion of the old homestead, where he 
resided up to 1868. when he removed to Greensburg, Pennsylvania. Here he 
was connected for a number of years with the mercantile business, which in 1894 
was sold to the Greer Brothers, and since that time led a retired life. Mr. 
Bowman is a Democrat, and for several years held the office of councilman of 
Greensburg. He is a member of the Lutheran church, and was for many years 
an officer of that church. He married Elizabeth Hine, and their children are: 
Simon, of Greensburg; Elizabeth, wife of Lucien Clawson, ex-sherift' and banker 
of Greensburg ; and Adam Keller, of whom later. 

Adam Keller Bowman was reared at home, acquiring his education in the 
Greensburg public schools. In 1870 he entered his father's store, and some 
two or three years later was made a member of the firm,*the firm name being 
changed from J. Bowman to J. Bowman & Sons, Simon Bowman also being 
made a member of the firm. From this time the management of the business 
was gradually assumed by Adam and his brother. Under their management 
the business prospered and grew to large proportions, becoming one of the 
leading dry goods and carpet establishments in Greensburg. In 1898 Adam K. 
Bowman retired from the firm, and engaged in the manufacture of garment 
hangers. One year later he perfected and patented a self-adjusting skirt 
hanger, the sales of which extend all over this and foreign countries. In 1902 
the business had grown to such proportions that more commodious quarters 
were necessary, and Mr. Bowman accordingly erected a three-story factory 
building on Penn .street, in Ludwick borough, where the business is now con- 
ducted on a large and paying scale. Mr. Bow^man's life is an example that may 
well be followed bv the rising generation ; an illustration of what those success- 
bringing qualities, industry, perseverance and strong will, can do in the way of 
attaining for a man a high place in the ranks of successful and prosperous 
people. Mr. Bowman affiliates with the Democratic party, and has served one 
term as a member of the borough council. He is a member of the Lutheran 
church, and takes a lasting interest in the welfare of that organization. In 
1889 Mr. Bowman married Martha Elizabeth Berlin, of Greensburg, and of 
their seven children five are living: Romayne, Joseijhine, IMargcry, Joseph and 
Edward. 

EDWARD HEXRY B.\IR, real estate dealer and member of the 
firm of Bair and Lane, at Greensburg, Pennsylvania, was born March 6. 1859, 
in the village of Congruity, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, the son of 
Henrv Nicholas Hacke Bair and Elizabeth (Keener) Bair. 

The grandfather, David Bair, emigrated from Lancaster counl\-, Pcnnsyl- 



90 



HISTORY OF U'ESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



vania, to Penn township, Westmoreland county, in the early years of the nine- 
teenth century, and died January 26. 1852, aged sixty years and twenty-four 
days. He married (first) Elizabeth Bowers, and (second) Sarah Bender. 

The father of Edward Henry Bair was born in Penn township about 1825 
and died January 11, 1873. He married Elizabeth Eliza Keener, daughter of 
Henry and Susan Keener, and moved to Congruity about 1848. He, with his 
brothers Isaac and Sebastian, were the inventors of what was known as the 
tumbling-shaft threshing machines and was largely interested in the machine 
business at Congruity at the time of his death in 1873. He was prominently 
known throughout the country as a manufacturer of farm machinery, etc. He 
was among the earliest undertakers in the county, and was the first to manu- 
facture broadcloth-covered coffins. He was one of the founders of Trinity Re- 
formed church at New Salem, as was also his wife. In politics he was a 
Democrat. He took a very active part in the public school system, and for 
many years served as a member of the school board in Salem township, and was 
a candidate for county commissioner at the time of his death. 

Mrs. Elizabeth (Keener) Bair traces her ancestry back to the Ubero and 
Frantzs and her great-grandfather, great-grandmother and their daughter 
were captured by the Indians about the time of the destruction of Hannahstown. 
The great-grandfather was murdered at the time, and the two women tal<en 
with the tribe of Indians to a point along the Monongahcla river, near present 
iMcKeesport, and after about six months of captivity escaped and stole their 
way back to their home just north of Greensburg. Mr. Bair's mother was born 
in 1824 and died in 1894 at Congruity, Pennsylvania. 

Edward Henry fiair was educated in the public schools in Salem township 
and at the i-^ew Salem Academy. He relates that perhaps through acquaint- 
ance and sympathy, more than for any other reason, he was made a teacher at 
the age of sixteen years in Salem township. After teaching for three years he 
was elected principal of the New Salem schools and during three summers, in 
partnership with I. E. Lauflfer, had charge of the New Salem Academy. He 
was elected in 1881, principal of the Scottdale public schools, and after two 
years resigned to locate in Greensburg for the purpose of readins: law. Here 
he took charge of the Ludwick schools. Two years later he drifted into the 
real estate business. He passed the preliminary law examination and registered 
with Beacon and Newill (attorneys), but owing to the rapid growth of his real 
estate business, he abandoned further law studies and since then has been 
largely interested in Greensburg real estate. 

For more than a dozen years he has been identified with manv enterprises, 
having promoted the Westmoreland Electric Company : the Westmoreland 
Light, Heat and Power Company ; the Greensburg Southern Street Railway 
Company ; the Westmoreland Realty Company ; the Iron Citv Land Companv ; 
the Atlantic Land Company, and many public enterprises. He is at present 
the senior member of the firm of Bair and Lane : vice-president of the Greens- 
burg Furnace Company : treasurer of the Greensburg and Cambridge Spring 
railway, and a director of the Merchants' Trust Company, besides being largely 
interested in numerous other enterprises in Westmoreland countv. 

In his religion he is identified with the Reformed church of Greensburg, 
and in politics is a Democrat. 'Sir. Bair is a member of Westmoreland Lodge, 
No. 518, F. and A. M. of Greensburg; Olivet Council Lodge, No. 13, LVania 
Chapter, Lodge No. 192: Kedron Commandery, Lodge No. 18, K. T., A. A. S. 
R. Valley of Pittsburg, and Svria Temple A. A. O. N. M. S.. and the present 
secretary of the Greensburg ^Masonic fund. By a vote of the people in the sev- 



HISTORY OF JVESTMORELAXD COUXTV. 91 

eral boroughs, June, 1905, the first of these ambitions was realized, and the 
second one has since made great progress. He was married at Latrobe, Penn- 
svlvania, October 14, 1885, to Esther Mary Suydam, daughter of Joseph L. 
and Mavy White Suvdam. Her father until a very short time before his death, 
at Coatesville, Pennsylvania, was the superintendent of the Wilmington and 
Delaware railroad. Mrs. Bair was educated at the schools of Coatsville and 
Latrobe. Their children were: Paul Suydam, Kenneth Henry, Helen, Edward 
Hart, Esther, and Joseph Lawrence. 

One of the ambitions of Mr. Bair, in a business sense and for general ]nib- 
lic good, is to bring about the consolidation of the numerous boroughs, sur- 
rounding the borough of Greensburg in order that the place may become a city 
and the'leading one in western Pennsylvania, for ideal homes. Another mat- 
ter in which he is greatly interested is that the public school system shall rise to 
such a standard as to admit its graduates to any of the large colleges, without 
additional preparation. It is his" sanguine belief that both of these, his worthy 
ambitions, will be fully realized, and within a short period. 

I. R. SMITH, a successful attorney and enterprising coal operator and 
l-.ianufactiirer of Scottdale. Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, was born 
March 29, 1850, the son of Jesse P. and Sarah (Robinson) Smith, and descends 
I'-om German ancestry. His paternal grandfather came from Germany about 
1790 and settled in Cass township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. He was 
a farmer of the sturdy type and prominent in the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He married a Miss Parnell, in Germany. They had six sons, of whom ]\lr. 
Smith's father was one. His name was Jesse, and he was next to the youngest 
son. 

Jesse P. Smith, the father, was a soldier in the Civil war in the Union 
army under General George B. JMcClellan. He was born in Huntingdon 
county. Pennsylvania, March 9, 1812. He followed farming for a livelihood. 
In religion he was identified with the Methodist Protestant church, and was a 
Republican in his political affiliations. He married Sarah Robinson, daughter 
of \'incent and Susan (Hess) Robinson, all of the same county. They were of 
Scotch parentage. IMr. and Mrs. Jesse P. Smith's children were : Thomas G. ; 
Samuel H. : ^lary S. (Mrs. Cook): J. R., see forward: Eliza Jane: Isaac 
Xewton. 

J. R. Smith, son of Jesse P. Smith, received his education at the common 
schools, and later took an academic course. He was reared to farm labor in 
Todd township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and read law with the well 
known law firm of Brown and Bailey, of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. He was 
admitted to the bar in the county of his native city in 1879, removing to West- 
moreland county in 1 88 1. He was admitted to the practice in tlie supreme 
courts in 1887, and soon after the organization of the superior court, and also 
a member of the United States court. Aside from his professional career he is 
interested in coal mining operations and manufacturing industries in Westmore- 
land county. Pennsylvania, and in the state of West Virginia. T-Ie has a law 
office at Greensburg. J!eing a firm believer in the principles of the Republican 
party, he has always cast his vote with this party. Aside from holding the 
office of school director, he has never sought or held public office. He is a 
member of the Presbyterian church at Scottdale. He was married, October 2, 
1884, near Ligonier. Pennsylvania, to Clara S. Clifford, who received a common 
school and academic education. Her father, C. Myers Clifford, and mother. 



HISTORY OF U-ESTMORELAXD COUNTY. 



Susan (}iIcElro_v) Clifford, are farmers. Their cliildren are: Jessie Anna, 
Clifford AI.. Vincent Robinson, Marquis AIcElroy, all born in Scottdale, Penn- 
sylvania, all unmarried at this time. 

WILLIAM THEODORE DOAI, Jr., an attorney practicing in the 
city of Greensburg, Pennsylvania, was born at that place July lo, 1873, the son 
of William Theodore and Eliza Jane (McCullough) Dom. 

(I) Philip Dom, the grandfather, was a native of Hesse Darmstadt, Ger- 
many. He came to America about 1821, locating at Berlin, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania. In religious faith he was a Lutheran, and in his political views 
was first a Whig and upon the formation of the Republican party became 
identified with that organization. By occupation he was a contractor and 
builder. He aided in building iron furnaces at Wellersburg, Pennsylvania. 
He also helped to construct the National pike road in the Shenandoah valley, 
between Winchester and Romney, Virginia. He became a prominent citizen, 
both in Berlin and Wellersburg, Pennsylvania. He married Margaret Gerhardt, 
a native of Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, a granddaughter of Sir John Jacob 
Hentz, who was the custodian of all the public records of the town of Beuern 
in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany. The Hentzs were very prominent among the 
families of that section of Germany. 

(II) William Theodore Dom. son of Philip Dom, was one of a familv of 
six brothers and two sisters. He was born August 10, 1844, at Wellersljurg, 
Pennsylvania. He was variously engaged as hotel keeper, merchant, coal and 
coke superintendent and banker. He now lives a retired life at Greensburg. 
Pennsylvania. His education was obtained in the public school. The church 
of his choice is the Presbyterian, and politically he affiliates with the Republican 
party, but has never sought office. He married Eliza Jane McCollogh, who bore 
liim three sons — William Theodore, John McCollogh and Welty McCollogh 
Dom. 

Of Mr. Dom's mother's family it may be said that tradition says that Hugh 
Brady (I) and Hannah McCormick, his wife, came from the forks of the Dela- 
ware and settled in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, about 1734. They were 
the parents of nine children. 

(II) Hugh Brady, the fourth son of Hugh and Hannah (McCormick) 
Brady, was born in 1740, and married Jane Yoimg, by whom nine children were 
born, including one named James. 

(HI James Brady, born in 1764, died 1839. He married Rachel Speer, 
and they became the parents of six children, including Jane. James Brady 
removed from the Cumberland valley and settled in Ligonier valley, Westmore- 
land county, Pennsylvania, at an early day, but went to Greensburg to assume 
the duties of sheriff, to which office he was elected in 1794, and resided there 
until his death. He was elected to the house of representatives for a term of 
three years. He was also a member of the state senate, three terms of four 
years each. In 1806 he was speaker of the senate. He was called by Governor 
Heister as one of his cabinet and served as secretary of the land office. The 
Bradys were Presbyterians and James was the first elder of this church at 
Greensburg, of whom there appears to be any record. He appeared as elder in 
the presbytery in 1802. In 1808 he and his pastor were chosen delegates to the 
general assembly. He frequently represented the church in the meetings of the 
presbytery, and from the numbers of committees on which he served in that 
bodv he must have been an active and useful member. He was an elder nearly 



HISTORY OF IVESTMORELAXD COUXTV. 93 

forty \ears. He was a cousin of Captain Samuel Brady and General Hugh 
Brady. 

'(I\') Jane Brady, born T794. died 1873. She married Jacob \\elty, who 
was born in 1791, and died in 1864. They were the parents of seven children. 
The \\'eltys came from Switzerland. 

I. lohn Jacob Welty, born in 1720, married Christina Broff, and they 
were the parents of six children. 

n. Henrv \\'elty, son of John Jacob, was born in 1764. died in T841. He 
married Catherine Steiner, and" they had nine children. 

HI. Jacob \N'eltv, son of Henry Welty, was born 1791, died i8(>4. He 
married Jane Brady (I\'), and they were the parents of seven children, in- 
cluding Eliza Catherine. 

I\'. Eliz? Catherine Welty, daughter of Jacob and Jane (Brady) Welt\-, 
was born in 1819, died 1882. She married John McCoIlogh, born in 1803, died 
in 1884. Thev had si.x children. The McColloghs came from Scotland and the 
name was there spelled ]\lcColloch. 

I. John McColloch"s parents removed from Scotland to the soutli of 
Ireland, where the father died when John was but six months of age. He was 
the only child in the family. The McCollochs were United Presbyterians. 
John came to Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and .settled in Mifflin township, 
"but was subsequently removed to a farm east of Newville. This farm is still 
owned bv the descendants. He was born in 1740 and died in 1808. He married 
and was the father of eight children. 

n. William ^IcCollogh, son of John McCollogh, married Sarah McBride, 
and they were the parents of eight children, including John. 

HI. John McCollogh was born in 1803 and died in 1884. He married 
Eliza Catherine Welty (IV), born 1819, died 1882. They were the parents of 
six children. 

I\'. Weltv McCollogh, son of John and Eliza C. JNIcCoUogh, was born in 
1847, died in i88g. He was a graduate of Princeton College, and in 1886 was 
elected to a seat in congress. He married Ada B. Markde, by whom two 
children were born. 

I\^ Eliza Jane ^klcCollogh. daughter of ;\Ir. and Airs. John McCollogh, 
was born in 1849; married \\illiam Theodore Dom, born in 1844. They were 
the parents of three children — William Theodore, of whom later: John, and 
Welty Dom. 

iV. Anna Weltv ?^lcCollogh. daughtei" of Mr. and Mrs. John IMcCollogh, 
was born in 1862; graduated from the I'ennsylvania College for \\'omen ; mar- 
ried Denna Charles Ogden, bom in i860, and now a prominent attorney at 
Greensburg. 

III. William Theodare Dom, son of William Theodore and Eliza Jane 
(McCollogh) Dom, obtained his education at the excellent public schools of 
Greensburg. his native city, and later attended the Oeensburg Seminary and 
finished at Washington and Jefferson College. In 1894 he registered as a law 
stuflent with his uncle-in-law, D. C. r)gden. and in 1896 was admitted to the bar 
of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. January i, 1904, he formed his pres- 
ent partnership, as a member of the law firm of Ogden & Dom. For about 
one year he served as official stenographer of the Orphans court, and from May 
to September, 1903, was deputy register of wills of the Orphans court of West- 
moreland county, but upon the death of his chief, S. C. Stevenson, he resigned 
to resume the practice of law. Politically he is a Repulilican, and has been 
active in promoting the interests of liis party. He made his first political 



94 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAXD COUXTY 



speech in 1892, and during the McKinley campaign was very active. In 1889 
he stumped the state for his party, when Colonel Barnett was a candidate for 
state treasurer. He has been secretary of the Republican county committee 
several times. He is at present a member of the Grecnsburg borough council 
He is an exemplary member of the First Presbyterian church at Grecnsburg. 
In 1895 he joined the National Guard of Pennsylvania, being a member of 
Company I, Tenth Regiment, and served as company clerk until the Spanish 
war, when he was appointed corporal and was mustered into the service of the 
government at Mount Gretna and accompanied the regiment to the Philippine 
Islands, where he was detailed as battalion sergeant-major under Major Jiierer. 
He also acted for a time as regimental sergeant-major for Colonel Hawkins. 
He was a charter member of the Order of Americus, which has been absorbed 
by the Grand Fraternity. He is a member of Lodge No. 511, B. P. O. E., be- 
ing one of its charter members ; has held various chairs and is now secretary 
of the order. He is also a charter member of Circle No. 2, Homeless Twenty- 
six, and Westmoreland Lodge, No. 518, F. and A. M. Mr. Dom married, No- 
vember 28, 1900, Lela M. Hudson, at (ireensburg, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Dom is 
the daughter of \\"illiam and Mary (Kepple) Hudson, whose ])eople are farm- 
ers. .She was educated in the public schools and is a graduate of Grecnsburg 
Seminary. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Dom are: .Vnna, bom at Grecnsburg, 
Pennsylvania, November 7. 1901 ; Lela. born at the same place. May 3, 1903. 

GEOKGE SLAINE, a steamship agent, court interpreter and notary 
public, is a native of Hungary, born at i\Iarkusfalva. March 23, 1866, the son of 
George and Mary ((iavulish) Slaine. The father was engaged in the farm and 
dairy business. In religion he espoused the Catholic faith, and in politics was 
independent. He received a good common school education and aiiforded his 
children the same. 

George Slaine was educated in the common schools and took a five years' 
course in the Gymnasium College at Iglo, Hungry. He came to America in 
1883, landing in New York City. March ist. He served in the L^nitcd States 
army as a member of the Sixteenth United States Regular Infantry Regiment, 
on the Western frontier, and was wounded and finally honorably discharged 
February 25, i8go, as a non-commissioned ofificer. He was discharp'ed on ac- 
count of ill liealth. He was in the command of Major Chaflfe (now lieutenant- 
general). Politically, Mr. Slaine is a supporter of the Democratic party and 
has served as official court interpreter for Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
for the past sixteen years. Of his religious faith it may be said that he adheres 
to that of the Roman Catholic church, and is a member of several benevolent 
societies. After leaving the arnw Mr. Slaine did clerical work for the deceased 
Imperial and Royal Hungarian Consul, Max Schamberg, at Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, and in 1890 was employed bv John Dunhill, a steamship agent at Greeiis- 
burg, Pennsylvania. Since 1894 he has been engaged in conducting a trans- 
Atlantic shipping office, chiefly for passengers and foreign exchange business, 
issuing drafts, or letters of credit. He was married at Grecnsburg, Pennsylvania, 
June 7, 1892, to Anna C, Hoebing. daughter of Herman and Christina Hoebing. 
■Mrs. Slaine's father was a carpenter by occupation. Their children were : Jos- 
ephine, born October 1.1, 1894, died November, 1896; Rose Amelia, born Octo- 
ber 28, 1896: Vincent R., born April 21, 1898: George H., born September 21, 
1899; Joseph B., born March 20, 1902: Dorothy C. born Tanuarv 28. 1905. 
These children were all born in Grecnsburg, Pennsvlvania. Mr. Slaine has been 





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^^J^^^^/rC^J 



mSTORY OF ]]-ESTMORELA.\D COUXTY. 95 

an uncommonly active, aggressive citizen of his adopted country and has a fine 
education, botli in Enghsh and in several other languages. He has been a 
loval citizen and is a prosperous business man. 

WILLIAM {•. SCHEIBLER. The Scheiblcr family is German. 
The first member of the branch which located in Peimsylvania was George 
Scheibler (I), who came from Germany in 1700 and effected settlement in 
.Montgomerv county. His wife's christian name was Catherine. They were 
])ioneer farmers, and reared two sons and one daughter: George, Catherine 
and Frederick Schiebler. They were of the Zwingle Reformed church faith. 
The son George went to North Carolina and becaiue -judge of the circuit 
court. Catherine remained at home, single. 

( II) Frederick Scheibler, youngest child of the American ancestor and 
his wife, was born 1763, died in 1843, aged eighty years, and was burie.d 
in Hempfield township, in the old schoolhouse cemetery grounds known as 
I'eightners. Thev espoused the Reformed religious creed and were devout 
members of that body. Politically Frederick Scheibler was a firni supporter 
of Tefl:'ersonian Democracy. He owned a farm, and taught school in the Ger- 
man language in the borough of Greensburg in an old log school house. He 
had the "honor of establishing the first bank of Greensburg, and used to drive 
back and forth from his farm nights and mornings while attending to the 
banking business. His early life was an exceptional one for hard experiences, 
hair-breadth escapes and real romance. When but fifteen years of age he, 
being well developed physically, was received as an enlisted soldier in the 
Continental army. He was soon captured and made a prisoner of war by 
the British forces and sent to the military prison on one of the West Indin 
Islands, but made his escape by being befriended by an American sympathizer 
•who conducted a tavern on the island. When he entered the tavern he was 
a dejected, dirty, ragged youth, whose very condition appealed to the sym- 
l^atliv of the innkeeper, who told him unless he would disguise that very 
night the officers from the prison would be there in the morning and doubtless 
recapture him. Consequently it was planned that he be thoroughly cleaned 
and dressed in a good suit of clothes and provided with a wig, or queue, then 
commonly worn. To the queue as a disguise he attributed his escape, and 
he continued to wear the queue up to his death. The officer came to search 
the tavern in the early morning and was informed that no person of the de- 
scription given was there. He then went to the bar of the inn and there 
beheld his prisoner in the role of a neatly dressed bartender, so perfectly dis- 
guised that he was not detected. He, too, was questioned about the escaped 
])risoner of war, but feigned to be entirely ignorant of theper.son sought after 
by the British officer, who finally purchased a drink and drank with the new 
bartender. The sequel of this narrative was that he remained in the employ 
of the innkeeper for six years, during which period he accumulated a good 
sum of money, and then sailed for Xew York, but was shipwrecked ofif the 
coast and clung to the wrecked vessel for forty-eight hours, after which he 
was picked up by a passing boat and landed in Xew York. From that citv 
he walked the entire distance to his home in Montgomery countv, Pennsyl- 
vania, having lost all of his possessions when ship was wrecked except 
two dollars in his vest pocket. His ambition while on the islands was to 
save his money, return home, purchase a fine team of horses and give his 
people a bi? surprise, but the fates decreed otherwise. The family during 
these seven lone vears of absence had never heard from him and believed 



96 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

him dead. Just as he was nearing the home place he met his father and 
brother, who were haying. A small stream had to be crossed by means of 
foot-logs, one of which was on either side of the wagon road. The father 
started on one and the "prodigal son" was about to take the same log, thmk- 
ing his father would know him, but the father then retraced his steps towards 
the other foot-log and they finally passed over the stream on different paths^ 
the son going on to the house in which he was born. His shoes had given 
out and he was barefooted, and his attire covered with dust of travel made 
him present a sorry sight. He seated himself on the door step beside a sister 
who was spinning, and said he by her permission would rest a while. He 
asked many questions and finally called for the "lady of the house," from 
whom he requested something to eat. This was soon provided him. While 
eating he asked the good woman what had become of a lock of hair she had 
taken from his head m childhood, whereupon the mother carefully scrutinized 
her caller and soon discovered her own long lost boy. The timid maiden 
who had been so shy threw ofl: her restraint and embraced her brother. He 
was of a roaming disposition, and after a short stay at home started west- 
ward, and finally "halted in Hempfield township, Westmoreland county, having 
walked from Montgomery county over the mountains. Here he settled and 
married Salome Leichty, of a prominent family, and the greataunt of the 
late Hon. Eli Leichty. She was born in 1763, died February 5, 1839. By this 
union one son was born — John Jacob Sdieibler. Frederick, the father, was 
of the Reformed church, and in politics a Democrat. 

HI. John Jacob Scheibler, only son of Frederick and Salome (Leichty) 
Scheibler, "was born in 1788, in Hempfield township, Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, at a point near the present borough of Youngwood. He died 
October 7, 1861. He was a sturdy farmer, and supported the Democratic 
party. He, too, was of the Reformed church faith. He married Catherine 
Truxel, daughter of John Truxel and wife; she died May 4, 1841, and was 
buried in the cemetery aforementioned. To John Jacob and Catherine 
(Truxel) Scheibler were born: John, Jacob, William, Elizabeth,, Hannah 
and Sarah. John and Jacob remained at home and fell heir to farms for- 
merly possessed by their father. William migrated to Iowa, where he spent 
the greater part of his life and where his descendants reside. 

IV. John Scheibler, eldest son of John Jacob and Catherine (Truxel) 
Scheibler, born April 22, 1810, died October 2, 1887. He married. May 
13, 1830, Mary Sell, daughter of Jacob Sell and wife, Rev. Nicholas P. 
Hacke performing the ceremony. Mrs. Scheibler was born April 4, 181 1, 
died Mav 5, 1883", and was buried in the old cemetery, but the remains were 
removed to the St. Clair cemetery at Greensburg, Pennsylvania. The chil- 
dren born to Mr. and Mrs. John Scheibler were : Simon G., born March 25, 
1832, of Greensburg, Pa.; Sarah, born June 7, 1834, married Jackson Baker, 
of Holton, Kansas; Hannah, born October 16, 1836, married Rev. T. F. 
Stauffer, of Sioux City, Iowa, and is now deceased ; Julia, born January i, 
1839, married Josiah Rumbough ; LTriah Frederick, born March 23, 1841, 
married Mary Sutman ; he died June 7, 1905 ; John S., born January 29, 
1844, married Sally Clarke, of Mount Pleasant, Pennsylvania; she died in 
1881 ; he moved to Abilene, Kansas, where he still resides; Jacob, born 
August 24, 1846, died April 12. 1890: Isaac P. O., born June 23, 1849. died 
single September 8, 1873; William F., born September 28, 1851. of whom 
later; Eli, born January 24, 1854, married Alice Weimer, resident of Hemp- 
field township. 



HISTORY OF irESTMORELAND COUNTY. 97 

V. William F. Scheibler, the second youngest son of John and 2\lary 
(^Sell) Scheibler, born September 28, 1851, obtained a good common school 
education and attended the county normals. He then followed the profession 
of a teacher in the Westmoreland county schools for a period of eleven years. 
He farmed some during this time and taught winter school. In the spring 
of 18S9 he removed to the Fifth ward of Greensburg borough, known as 
"Bunker Hill," where he engaged in general merchandising, which business 
has grown to one of large proportions and which he still comlucts. His 
annual sales have been as high as $35,000. He began in a modest way and 
his good wife attended to the little store, while he "hustled" in the country 
purchasing and trading for live stock and country produce, until the. town 
grew up around him, increasing his trade until his whole time with that of 
several clerks was required to handle the large volume of business. He also 
handled real estate to quite an extent, and became a prosperous business 
factor of the borough. For several years he has been engaged by the officers 
of the Street Railway Company to secure right-of-way along the rural lines. 
In brief his has been an active career, built up by energy and strict integrity. 
While other men have sought ease and trifling pleasures, Air. Scheibler ap- 
plied his every energy in the direction of his business, which has been crowned 
with an almost phenomenal success. He is a Democrat in politics. While 
too busy in the marts of trade to seek out public office, he served his native 
township as school director, and upon moving to the borough of Greens- 
burg, where he has lived and operated the past sixteen years, he was made 
a justice of the peace, serving five years ; also member of the school board. 
He and family are members of Reformed church. 

He married, September 29, 1874, at Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, Cath- 
erine E. Brugh, daughter of Jacob and Catherine Brugh, the ceremony being 
performed by Rev. T. F. Stauiifer. Their children were : Stella L., born 
December 25, 1875, married Flarry E. Blank, an attorney of Greensburg. and 
they have a daughter, Catherine \'irginia, born September 12, 1902. Harrv 
S., born July 27, 1877, married Jessie Overly, of Greensburg, Pennsylvania, 
and their children are : Ruth E., born March 13, 1900, and Helen Reed, born 
October 12, 1902. He is a traveling salesman for the Allen Kirkpatrick Gro- 
cery Company, of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Florence Ethel, born November 
II, 1885, at home. At both the stcjre and the residence of Mr. Scheibler are to 
,be seen the evidence of education and refinement. The family are greatly 
attached to one another, even to the rosy-cheeked grandchildren, who are of 
the seventh generation from the founder of the family in .Vnurica, George 
Scheioler, who landed in a strange land in 1700. 

THE MARTZ P'AMIIA' is of German origin. Charles Martz and 
wife Katharine were the parents of Daniel Martz, who was born in Armstrong 
county, Pennsylvania, January 26, 1820. He was a shoemaker. He married Sara 
Richard, born August 2, 1818. By this union were born: Lucinda (Mrs. Hill), 
born January 25, 1848; Maria (Mrs. Willard Stewart), born September 4, 
1849; James Dougherty, born 185 1 : John, born February 25, 1834: Katharine 
born .\pril 3, 1856, died June 8, 1885: .Mary, (Mrs. UpdegrafT)", lK)rn .March 
18, i860. 

James D. Martz, son of Daniel and Sara (Richard) Martz, born 1851, 
married (first) Margaret Jane .\malong, born June 2, 1857. Their 
children were: Martha Jane, born December 13, 1876; George W., born 
February 22, 1878; Lebens Bigelow, born March 12, 1880; Rovd Ellsworth, 



98 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

born October 6, 1881 ; Anna Maud, born ]\larch 14, 1884; Clara Edith, born 
February 2, 1886. The mother died September 8, 1886, and Mr. Martz mar- 
ried (second) April 3, 1888, Lucy Melinda (Fry) x\lexander, the daughter of 
George and Lovinia Fry. She was born November 10, 1851. By the last mar- 
riage one child was born, Leroy, August 14, i88g. 

George W. Martz, son of James D. and Margaret Jane (Amalong) Martz, 
was born February 22, 1878. He received a good common school education, 
and with his brother engaged in the billiard parlor and restaurant business at 
Greensburg, and is still of the firm of Martz Brothers in the same line of bus- 
iness. In politics he is a Republican, and is numbered among the members of 
the First Lutheran Church of Greensburg. Mr. Martz married, December 24, 
1902, Mary Agnes Ashbough, daughter of William Jefferson and Julia Etta 
(Cunningham) Ashbough. The father was born August 5, 1858, and the 
mother August 5, 1862. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Ashbough were: 
Mary Agnes, born September 26, 1885 ; Rose May, born April 30, 1887; Bessie 
Irene, born February 16, 1892; William Alvin, born September 8, 1894; John 
Milton, born August 21, 1897; Ruth Jenette, born February 6, 1902. The chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. George W. Martz are : Mary Zelma, born October 19, 
1903 : George Everett, born April 26, 1905. 

CYRL'S M. P'L^NK, a prosperous farmer and saw mill operator of 
Greensburg, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, is descended from a family 
which was among the pioneer settlers of the state. 

( I ) Christian Funk, the founder of the Funk family in the United 
States, came from Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and settled in Sewickley town- 
ship, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. He had received a common school 
education, and pursued the occupation of milling and farming. He was a 
member of the United Brethren church. He married, and among his children 
was a son Abraham S. 

(II) Abraham S. Funk, son of Christian Funk, (i), married, and had a 
son Christian. 

(III) Christian Funk, son of Abraham S. Funk (2), was twice married. 
Two sons of the children of the first wife are jirominent ministers in the United 
Brethren church, Abraham, in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and Ross, in Dayton, 
Ohio, where he is also at present publishing agent of the United Brethren Pub- 
lishing House. Several of the sons of the first wife were noted as bei^^ig 
exceedingly stout and of great strength. Among the children of the second 
wife were: David, of whom later: Joseph, and Simon. All of these are de- 
ceased. 

(IV) David Funk, son of Henry Funk (3) and his second wife, was born 
in Sewickley township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, June 25, 1817. He 
was educated in the common schools of the district, and followed the occupation - 
of farming. He was a Democrat, and a member of the L^nited Brethren church. 
He married Hester Gross, born in New Stanton, Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania, daughter of Joseph and Susanna (Zutzk) Gross, both native's of 
Westmoreland county. Joseph Gross lived in New Stanton many years, taught 
school there, kept a general store, was a justice of the peace, and was elected 
clerk of the court of the county. He was one of the founders of the LTnited 
Brethren church in Greensburg, and spent the latter years of his life in that 
town. His wife survived him by but a few years. The children of David and 
Hester (Gross) Funk were: Joseph G., who was killed in the battle of Peters- 
burg, during the Civil war ; Simon K., of Vinland, Kansas ; Cyrus M., of whom 



HISTORY OF ]J-ESTMOREL.L\P COUXTV. 99 

later: Christopher, of Xew Stanton, Pa.; \\iniam, of Cribbs, Westmorehmd 
county : Siisana, died young : JMaHnda E., deceased, was the wife of Cyrus 
Hodgekin : Mary E., wife of Robert F. Albright; Henry Z., of Jeanette, Penn- 
sylvania; Catherine, wife of John Irwin; two died in infancy; and David M., 
of Latrobe, Pennnsylvania. 

{V) Cvrus yi. Funk, son of David and Hester (Gross) Funk, was born in 
Sewicklev township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, December 19, 1846. 
He was educated in the common schools of his native town, and upon leaving 
them turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, in which he has been very 
successful. His farm is a model of neatness and thrift, and as he understands 
farming thoroughly he has made his land very productive. During the Civil 
war he was ready to bear his share in the defence of his country, and served 
as a private in Company E, Captain Clark L. Brant, Two Hundred and Sixth 
Regiment Pennsxlvania \'ohmteers. He entered the service September i, 1864, 
and was honorably discharged June 26, 1865, at the close of the war, at Rich- 
mond. \"irginia. He is a Democrat in politics, and is a member of the United 
Brethren church, in Greensburg, Pennsylvania. He contributes liberally to the 
Home and Foreign ^Missionary Society, and to the Church Erection Society. 

J. K. LONG. Among the active and representative citizens of West- 
moreland county, Pennylvania may be mentioned the name of J. K. Long, who 
was born one mile south of the town in which he now resides, Greensburg, in 
Hempfield township, October 27, 1863. He is the youngest child in the family 
of Samuel and Alary (Scepter) Long, and a grandson of Nicholas Long, who 
was one of the early settlers of Westmoreland county. 

Samuel Long (father) was born in the vicinity of Adamsburg, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, 1822. During early life he learned the trade 
of blacksmith, which occupation he followed continuously up to the year 1881, 
in addition to that of buying and selling coal, which latter line of work he en- 
gaged in for several years. He purchased in 1881, his present farm, which 
is now under a high state of cultivation, and therefore very productive. He 
lias always been an active and earnest worker in the interests of the Democratic 
party, particularly in Westmoreland county, and being a careful student of 
politics his counsel was often sought and followed. He married Mary Scep- 
ter, daughter of Fred Scepter, in 1845. Their family consisted of six children. 

J. K. Long attended the common schools of Hempfield township, thereby 
thoroughly qualifying him for an active, useful life. He accepted, in 1881, a po- 
sition as teacher in the common schools, and continued as such for eight con- 
secutive terms, discharging his duties to the satisfaction of all concerned. In 
January, 1889, he was appointed deputy clerk bv James D. Best, clerk of the 
courts of Westmoreland cfninty. and the duties jicrtaining to this res[)onsible 
position were performed in a highly creditalale and efficient manner, winning 
for him the approbation of his chief. He is a firm believer in the principles 
as laid down by Thomas Jefiferson, and in the politics of Westmoreland county 
he takes a keen and active interest. Mr. Long was married in December, 1889, 
to Rosella Spiegel, a daugliter of John and Elizabeth Spiegel. 

JOHN H. r^lclXTYRE. Few names arc more familiar to the citizens 
of Greenslnirg than is that of John H. McTntyre. He is a son of Jolm and Sarah 
(Wentzell) Mclntyre. and was born April 18, 1875. He received his education 
In the common schools of Hempfield township, finishing his studies at the age 
of sixteen, when he went to learn the painter's trade with his uncle L. P. Went- 



37i:U)ii 



lOO HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

zell. That he was as dihgent and apt to learn in the shop as he had been in 
the school room is proved by the fact that in the course of time he bought out 
his uncle, and has since successfully conducted a paint shop in Greensburg. He 
has displayed much business enterprise and is in all respects a useful and 
worthy citizen. He married Bertha, daughter of Joseph R. and Emma Kling- 
ensmith, and they are the parents of two children : William and Grace. 

^\TLLIA]\I N. DAVIS. One of the county's enterprising business 
men is William N. Davis, of Greensburg, born November 23, 1873, in Arm- 
strong county, Pennsylvania, son of Isaac and Lucy (Remaley) Davis, both 
natives of the same county. 

Until reaching the age of fifteen William N. Davis attended the common 
schools of his native county, and then for two years was engaged in agricultural 
pursuits. At the end of that time he took a position as clerk in a general store 
at South Greensburg, where he remained six years. He then opened a gen- 
eral feed store on Mount Pleasant street, at the Pennsylvania railroad crossing, 
where he has since conducted a flourishing business. He deals extensively in 
everything pertaining to his line of trade. He takes an active interest in every- 
thing relating to the welfare of the community, and supports with his voice and 
vote the principles advocated and u])held bv the Democratic party. JMr. Davis 
married, April 12, lyoo, Laura \. Searight, and they have two children: Oliv- 
erettie Jennie, born August 6. 1901 ; and William Remalia Derry, born July 23, 
1903. Mrs. Davis was born in 1877. in Pittsburg, and is the daughter of Sam- 
uel and Oliverettie (Cunningham) Searight, both natives of that city. 

JOHN WILLIAM MOORE, son of Ebenezer and Nancy B. (Hurst) 
Moore, was born April 16, 1837 '" Rostra ver township, Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania. His paternal grandfather, Robert Moore, moved from Cecil 
county, Maryland, in 1780 and settled there. He married Jane Power, a sister 
of Rev. James Power, D. D., who in 1774 was the first Presbyterian to settle 
and preach in the "Western Wilds." Robert Moore erected a large two-story 
house into which he moved and lived during his life. 

Ebenezer Moore, the youngest of Robert Moore's six children, was born 
August 3. 1793. He moved to the old Blackstone farm in Tyrone township, 
Fayette county, Pennsylvania in 1846, and added to the farm by the purchase 
of one hundred and fifty acres of adjoining land. These two farms were heav- 
ily underlaid with coal, and it was here that the coke interests were started, 
which have since been developed by his sons J. W. and P. H. Moore.- Ebenezer 
Moore was six feet in height, and a man of commanding presence. He was an 
elder in the Presbyterian church, and a Democrat in politics. He represented 
Westmoreland county in the legislature in 1844, and it is an interesting fact that 
he received all the votes except five that were cast in his own township. He was 
married in May, 1833, to Nancy Blackstone Hurst, daughter of James and 
Sarah Hurst, of Mount Pleasant township, Westmoreland count}-, Pennsyl- 
vania. They had six children : one died in infancy ; Sarah Jane, died February 
23, 1858, at the age of thirteen : James H. ; Rev. R. B. Moore, D. D. ; John W., 
the subject of this sketch and P. H. The old house is standing in which the 
father and children were born, and the farm has been in possession of the fam- 
ily for one hundred and twenty-five vears. 

John William Moore received his early education in the common schools 
of his native towaiship and Elder's Ridge Academy. He afterwards took a full 
business course at the Iron City Commercial College, from which he was grad- 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. loi 



uated in 1856. In his early lift: he was extensively engaged in stock dealing in 
Westmoreland, Fayette, and Greene counties. Mr. Moore practically retired 
from that business in 1873. He made an investment in the Connellsville Coke 
industry (at that time just attracting public notice) and formed a partnership 
with James Cochran, Solomon Kiester, and James Hurst for the manufacture 
of coke at the Summit Coke Works, near Broad Ford, Fayette county, Penn- 
svlvania. After six years he withdrew from this firm, purchased the Red 
Stone Coke plant, three miles south of Uniontown, and engaged in the coke 
business with his brother, P. H. Moore. Colonel J. S. Schoonmaker was ad- 
mitted as a partner in 1881, and four years later J. W. Moore withdrew. He 
bought two thousand acres of coal land in Mount Pleasant township in 1S79, 
where he built the "Mammoth Coke W^orks," and put in operation six hundred 
ovens. He increased his coke business in 1889 by the purchase of the "Wynn 
Coke Works, near Uniontown. He sold, August 23, 1889, his entire coke inter- 
est to the H. C. Frick Coke Company for a large sum, and practically with- 
drew from active business. He died February 19, 1893. 

Mr. Moore was married, November 22, i860, to Elizabeth Stauffer, a 
daughter of M. B. and Charlotta Stauffer, of Connellsville, Pennsylvania, and 
they had six children. Mrs. Elizabeth Staufl:'er Moore has a beautiful home at 
Greensburg, and is largely interested in its charities. She also maintains a 
fine winter establishment in Washington, D. C. 

DAMD PORTER HUDSON, an enterprising business factor of the 
city of Greensburg, Pennsylvania, was born ]\lay 4, 1873, in Salem township, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, son of William and Mary (Kepple) Hud- 
son. The paternal grandfather was William Hudson, whose parents lived in- 
Bedford county, Pennsylvania, and moved to W"estmoreIand, settling at Pleas- 
ant Unity, when he was a small boy. William Hudson, Sr., was a farmer by 
occupation. ' He was a supporter of the Republican party from its organization, 
and in religious matters affiliated with the Presbyterians. He married Sallie 
Fisliel, of Saltsburg, Pennsylvania. William Hudson, Jr., was a native of 
AX'estmoreland county, also a farmer and stockman. He married Mary Kepple, 
daughter of Mr. and I\Irs. John Kepple. of Salem township, W^estmoreland 
county. 

David Porter Hudson, son of William Hudson, Jr., and his wife, Mary 
Kepple, received a common school education and later attended the Greensburg 
Seminary. After leaving school he engaged in the real estate business, and 
for three years has been connected with the Westmoreland Savings & Trust 
Company. He is one of the directors of the Westmoreland Grocery Company 
and the Greensburg Finance Cmpany ; one of the organizers and directors of 
the Pleasant Unity National Bank ; and director of the Westmoreland & Sav- 
ings and Trust Company. Politically Mr. Hudson is a staunch supj^orter of 
the Republican party. He is the present treasurer of the borough of Greens- 
burg. He is a member of the First Presbyterian church, and of the B. P. O. E., 
Uodge No. 511. October 25. 1899, he was married to Eva Ammann. daughter 
of Fred and Laura (McDowell) Ammann, of Orrville, Ohio. Mrs. Hudson re- 
ceived a liberal erlucation at .Mount I'nion College of Alliance. Ohio. 

\VILLTAM THOMAS WELTY. who was one of the leading factors 
in the business circles of Westmoreland county, and a man who was always 
held in high esteem by his friends and business associates, was born at Delmont, 



I02 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

Westmoreland count)-, Pennsylvania, June 5, 1862, a son of John H. and Mar- 
garet J. (Craig) Welty. 

Daniel Welty, grandfather of William T. Welty, was bom in Greensburg, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, September 13, 1806. He was an active 
member of the German Lutheran church, with which he was connected from 
his childhood to 1847, when he became one of the organizers of the English 
Lutheran church. He held office in this church for a long period of time, and 
during his membership, which continued until his death, the communion roll 
showed him absent but twice, and on both of these occasions he was unable to 
attend owing to illness. Mr. Welty married Barbara Bierer, and twelve chil- 
dren were born to them, seven of whom survive : Daniel, resides in Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania ; Ehzabeth, wife of Rev. Samuel Aughey, geologist, late of Lin- 
coln, Nebraska ; Frank E., of Pittsburg ; Thomas J., of Washington ; Robert 
F., of Turtle Creek; Susan, wife of Rev. V. B. Christy, Ellerton, Ohio; and 
Clarissa, of Ada, Ohio. Daniel Welty married for his second wife Sarah A. 
Craig. His death occurred December 8, 1874, when he was sixty-eight years of 
age. His widow survived him several years. William B. Welty, son of Daniel 
Welty, participated in the Civil war. He was a member of the Flag Company, 
and fell in the battle of Antietam. In the same company were nine cousins, all 
of whom were wounded and one of whom later succumbed to his wounds. 

John Henry Welty, the second child of Daniel Welty, and father of Will- 
iam Thomas Welty, was born in Pleasant Unity, Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania, September 25, 1834. He was reared at home, and early in life was 
an assistant in his father's store in Hannahstown, and later was employed for 
a year in the store of Lewis Trauger, of Greensburg, Pennsylvania. His ex- 
perience in these stores gained for him much valuable information relative to 
the mercantile business, which was of inestimable aid to him in later years. He 
subsequently engaged in the general mercantile business for himself in Delmont^ 
Westmoreland county, there conducting an eminently successful and prosperous 
business for ten years. At the expiration of this time he removed to Allegheny, 
Pennsylvania, where he became a member of the firm of Welty Bros., in the 
carpet business, retaining his connection with this firm for four years. In 1886 
he moved to Greensburg, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, where he en- 
gaged in business, and was for a number of years one of the best known and 
highly res])ected merchants of that town. Mr. Welty was a consistent member 
of the Lutheran church for forty-five years. November 10, 1858, he was united 
in marriage to Margaret J. Craig, daughter of James and Jane (Brown) Craig, 
of Hannahstown, Pennsylvania. Her father was one of the well known fann- 
ers of that section. Their children were : Duella M., widow of J. ]\L Bortz, of 
Greensburg ; Jennie, Blanche. Martha and William Thomas Welty. All of these 
children are deceased excepting Duella M., who resides in Greensburg. John 
H. \\'elty died July 20. 1901, after a useful and well-spent life. 

William Thomas Welty, the second child and onlv son of John H. and 
Margaret J. (Craig) Welty, was but a boy when his parents moved to Pitts- 
burg where they remained a short time. They then returned to Hannahstown, 
where William T. was reared. His early educational training was acquired in 
the common schools of this tow-n and later at Greensburg Academy. In 1883 
then in his twenty-first year, he went to Greensburg, Pennsylvania, to enter into 
the employ of Mr. Lewis Trauger, then one of the prominent dry-goods mer- 
chants of that town. His genial disposition soon won for him a host of friends 
in his newly adoi>ted residence, and for fifteen years he held a responsible po- 
sition in Mr. Trauger's business. In 1898 Lewis Trauger died, and Mr. Welty 



HISTORY or U'ESTMORELJXD COUXTV. 103 

purchased tlie entire stock of goods. This seemed a large undertaking, hut it 
was one in which he prospered even beyond his own expectations, and in 190 1 
he purchased the building in which he transacted his business. He enjoyed the 
contidence and respect of his fellow-townsmen, won for him by the upright and 
general fair dealing which characterized all his business transactions. Mr. 
\\'elty was one of the leading members of the Zion Lutheran church, was for 
over twenty years a member of the church choir, was a deacon of the church for 
several years, and was always prominently and actively identified with Sunday 
school work. He was a member of the I. O. of H. and the J. O. U. A. M. 

April 27, 1893, j\Ir. Welty was united in marriage with Ada S. Thomas, of 
Westmoreland county, daughter of Abraham \\'. anil Sarah ( Henry ) Thomas. 
Her father. Abraham W. Thomas, was born in Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania, June 18, 1839, a son of John and Catherine Thomas. He is a member 
of one of the old families of Westmoreland county, and has always been held in 
high esteem by his fellow-citizens. Until recent years his life was spent on his 
farm three miles east of Greensburg, but he is now a resident of Greensburg. 
When the great Civil war was in progress I\Ir. Thomas enlisted, September 14, 
1863, in Companv H, Seventy-sixth Regiment, serving until the close of the 
war when he was honorably discharged, July 18, 1865. He is a member of the 
G. A. R. In religious matters he affiliates with the Reform church, in the affairs 
of which he was always interested. Mrs. Welty's mother, Sarah (Henry) 
Thomas, was born in Hempfield township, daughter of Nathan and Sarah 
(Miller) Henry. Her death occurred in March, 1894. The sudden and unex- 
pected death of Mr. W'elty, which occurred September 24, 1903, was a great 
shock to all of Greensburg, his death being caused by a clot of blood in an artery 
leading to the heart. The evening previous to his decease he had been about his 
work as usual. By his death the community lost an honorable citizen, and a 
man whose character remained unblemished to the last. ;\[rs. W. T. W^elty how 
resides in Greensburg with her daughter and only child, Margaret L. Welty. 
She is an intelligent and accomplished woman, an active church worker, and 
prior to her husband's death was a member of the church choir and a teacher 
in the Bible class of the church. 

W ILLIAM A. R( )DEHA\'ER, one of the enterprising business men 
of Westmoreland county, was born in Preston county. West Virginia, March 
14. 1867, and was the son of George and Sevilla (Kelly) Rodehaver, one of 
nine children, five of whom survive: William A., Freeman, Greensburg; 
Amanda, wife of Rufus Kisner, of W'est Virginia : John, in the lumber busi- 
ness in West \'irginia : and Emma, wife of Floyd Ringer, of West \'irginia. 
^\'illi^m A. Rodehaver's wather was born in Preston county. West Virginia, 
m Xovember, 1840. He is of German descent, and was reared on the home 
farm. During his young manhood he learned the trade of a miller, and worked 
as a journeyman miller for a number of years, later purchasing a mill which 
he still owns. He served three years and six months in the Civil war as a 
bugler, and is a member of the G. A. R. His wife, Sevilla (Kelly) Rode- 
haver, was born in Preston county. West \'irginia. and was of (lerman de- 
scent. She died in the early eighties, and Mr. Rodehaver married Clara Wat- 
.son, by whom four children were born, three of whom are still living: Etta, 
Ada and Earl. 

William A. Rodehaver wss reared at home and educated in the common 
schools of his native place. When about eighteen years of age he commenced 
work at the carpenter trade with his father. About two vears later lie entered 



I04 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

into the shoemaker's trade, which he followed for several years. In January, 
1889, he removed to Greensburg, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, where 
he entered into the employ of the firm of Kelly & Jones, and while there learned 
the trade of moulder. He retainetl his connection with this firm until 1896, and 
for the four succeeding years he was variously engaged. Since 1900 he has 
followed carpentering and building, in which occupation he has been very suc- 
cessful. Mr. Rodehaver is an excellent citizen, industrious and energetic, and 
is one of South Greensburg's representative men. In political affairs he helps 
support the Republican party. He has served one year as street commissioner, 
one year as assessor, and is at present a member of the borough council. He is 
a member of Greensburg lodge. No. 366, K. G. E. He married, March 19. 1890, 
Minnie ISlackson, daughter of Jacob and Rebecca (Shircy) Blackson, both of 
whom are still living and reside in Unity, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. 
One child was born to Mr. and Mrs. Rodehaver, Ethel May, bijrn January 9, 
1891, and died October 11, 1891. 

HENRY LOMESON KEAGGY is well known in Westmoreland 
county, as well as that entire section of Pennsylvania, having been for many 
years employed on the railroads in various capacities, and is at the present time 
( IQ06) manager of the Brothers large estate. The family which he represents 
came originally from Switzerland, but have been settled in America for a 
number of generations. 

(I) John Keaggy, father of Henry Lomeson Keaggy, was born in Switzer- 
land, and came to the United States about 1825. He was a stone mason by oc- 
cupation, and died in 1843. He married Margaret Lomeson, born in Indiana 
county, Pennsylvania, 181 1. died in Allegheny City, 1893. She was the daugh- 
ter of John and Ann (Fulkerson) Lomeson, the latter born in Danville, Penn- 
sylvania. John Lomeson (grandfather) built a grist mill at Cherry Run. They 
had si.x children, none of whom are now living and among whom were: Will- 
iam, was a farmer and died in Armstrong county ; John, was a farmer and died, 
in ]Michis:an : Jerry, died near Homer. Indiana county, Pennsylvania ; Henrr, 
who studied medicine, became a prominent physician, and amassed a fortune, 
which he left to a nephew. Dr. J. B. Keaggy, who lives in Allegheny City, is 
married but has no children. 

John and Margaret (Lomeson) Keaggy had six children: William, mar- 
ried ; Margaret, married ; Lucy, deceased, married Erastus Gray, who was a 
railroad engineer and was killed by falling in front of his own engine at Bar- 
docks, on the old Pittsburg & Connellsville Railroad : David, married ; Henry 
Lomeson, of whom later ; and John, married. 

(II) Henry Lomeson Keaggy, third son and fifth child of John and Mar- 
garet (Lomeson) Keaggy, was born in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, March 
25, 1845. He was raised on the farm, receiving a common education, and at the 
age of fifteen years enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Seventh Regi- 
ment, Pennsylvania \'olunteers, December, i860. He served with the Army 
of the Potomac until September, 1862. He was in six battles and displaved 
bravery and courage remarkable in one so young. He was wounded in the first 
battle at Fredericksburg, and was sent to the hospital where he lay for two 
months and was then sent home. He commenced working on the Pittsburg and 
Cleveland Railroad in the capacity of brakeman, and worked his way up 
through the various positions of conductor and train dispatcher until 1899, 
when he assumed the management of the Brothers' estate, at Greensburg, 
W'estmoreland county, Pennsylvania. He is considered a very eflficient and cap- 



HISTORY OF jrESTMORELAXD COUXTV. lo: 



.able manager and his services are highly satisfactory to his employers. He 
married Margaret Kissig Parke, born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, June 
19. 1865, daughter of Robert Alatthias Parke, a Alethodist preacher, who built 
the first church in Allegheny City, preaches there, and defrays all the expenses. 
Robert M. Parke had a family of five children, two sons and three daughters, 
•of whom but two are now living : Margaret Kissig, wife of Henry L. Keaggy, 
and Helen. 

EMOR i\I. GARWOOD is one of the prominent business men among 
the younger generation of Greensburg, and is the first of his family in \\'cst- 
moreland county. For over a century the Garwoods have been land-owners 
and prominent citizens of Fayette county, the family estate being about three 
miles south of Brownsville, in Luzerne township. The original ancestors of 
the Garwood family came from England and settled among the Quakers in the 
eastern part of Pennnsylvania. (Jbed Garwood removed from Cumberland 
county to Fayette county, purchasing four hundred acres of land in Luzerne 
township. Xovember 16, 1783. His son Obed succeeded to this land and 
lived and died in Fayette county. Benedict Garwood, his son, brought up a 
large familv on the old homestead in Fayette county, and George, the young- 
est son, was born there in 1839. Georg^e Garwood was married to Rachel M. 
Haney, a native of Fayette county in 1862. He died Septem- 
ber 28, 1903, and his widow survived less than a year, dying June 25, 1904. 
They had nine children, named respectively, Edith F., Charles S., Emor M., 
see forward ; Albert G., Frank E., Harry Clyde, Nathaniel E.. Bessie M., 
and Evelyn L., the latter being the wife of W. S. Rial, of Greensburg. 

In September, 1887. Emor M. Garwood left the farm and going west 
began business for himself in Streator. Illinois, where he was engaged as book- 
keeper for Powers Brothers, a large hardware firm. He was afterwards assistant 
cashier of the freight department of the Chicago, Burlington and Ouincy rail- 
road at Streator. Leaving Illinois in 1889, he came to Uniontown, Fayette 
county, and shortlv afterward removed to Westmoreland county, where he 
became proprietor of the Hill House in Scottdale. In October. 1900, he 
located in Greensburg as manager of the Monahan Hotel, and in 1902 ]nir- 
cliased the Zimmerman House, which has since been singularlv successful under 
his management. He married. July 26, 1887, Katharine Chalfant Cline, daugh- 
ter of T. H. and Elizabeth Cline, of P.rownsville. Thev have had three chil- 
dren, but one of whom. Marie Chalfant, is living. They are members of 
•Christ's Episcopal Church, of Greensburg. The Garwoods have been ReDubli- 
cans since the birth of the party in 1856, and prior to that were Whigs. Emor 
M. Garwood has always been an active worker in the Republican party, casting 
his first vote for Benjamin Harrison in 1888. Though an earnest worker in the 
ranks, he has never sought oiTicial position. He is now. however, prominently 
spoken of as a candidate for sheriff of Westmoreland county, in 1907. and his 
■energy, prompt business principles and substantial character eminently fit him 
for the position. 

J.^MES CARROLL. A tvnc of the successful self-made business 
man is found in James Carroll, of Greensburg. Mr. Carroll's fatlicr. Joseph 
•^arroll, was a native of Allcghenv county, Pennsylvania, where he passer! his 
life PS a farmer. He married Catherine ?\lclliianev. and their children were: 
r)livcr L., deceased: Tames, of whom bter: William, deceased: TT;innah de- 
■ceased : and Mary, widow of E. J. McEllee, of Mount Pleasant. When little 



io6 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

more than infants Air. Carroll's children were left fatherless, and their mother 
sold the farm and moved to Elizabeth, Allegheny connty. 

James Carroll, son of Joseph and Catherine (Mcllhaney) Carroll, was born 
November 14, 1848^ in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and was but eight 
years of age when his father died and his mother moved with her children 
to Elizabeth. He was educated in the common schools of that city, and about 
his fifteenth year apprenticed himself to the trade of carpenter in Pittsburg, 
where he remained until 1878, working at his chosen calling. He then went to 
Mount Pleasant where he worked for eight years as a carpenter and builder, 
and about 1886 moved to Greensburg where he has since been engaged in build- 
ing. He is a Republican in politics, and is a member of the United Presbyterian 
church. Mr. Carroll married in 1872, Elvira J. Hart, of Indiana county. They 
were without children. In 1894 Mrs. Carroll died and Mr. Carroll has since 
remained a widower. 

JOSEPH THOMAS. One of Greensburg's most successful citizens 
is Joseph Thomas. The parents of Mr. Thomas were both natives of Germany, 
having been bom on the banks of the Rhine. William Thomas, his father, 
was a carpenter and cabinetmaker. He married Mary y\nna Auen, and six chil- 
dren were born to them, three of whom survive : William, a florist at Sharon, 
Pennsylvania; Joseph, mentioned hereafter; and Agnes, wife of Frederick 
IMuehlenbeck, of Tarentum, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. In 1881 Airs. 
Thomas died, and in 1890 her husband followed their children to the United 
States, where he passed away in 1892. 

Joseph Thomas, son of William and Mary Anna (Auen) Thomas, was born 
June 9, 1869, in Prussia, on the banks of the Rliine, and as early as his four- 
teenth year apprenticed himself to the trade of a florist. Previous to this time 
he had attended the public schools, and while learning his trade completed his 
education at the evening schools. In 1888 he came to the United States and 
accepted a position as landscape gardener for R. P. Duff, of Pittsburg. Later he 
worked in the same capacity for Mrs. McMasters, of Turtle Creek, and in 1890 
became foreman for A. W. Smith, the well-known florist of Pittsburgh. This 
position he retained about eighteen months, and was then engaged as gardener 
and florist by St. Xavier's Academy of Westmoreland county, where he re- 
mained four years. He then went to Greensburg and for six months was em- 
ployed by D. M. Sheerer. At this stage of his career Mr. Thomas engaged in 
business for himself as a florist and landscape gardener. He leased the Barclay 
lot on North Main street for seven years and there erected his greenhouses. In 
September, 1902, he purchased a portion of the Belvedere farm, two and one- 
half miles northwest of Greensburg, where he built extensive greenhouses and a 
substantial residence. His business, meanwhile, increased rapidly and he now 
stands at the head of his line of enterprise in Greensburg, having a salesroom 
in the Wealty building, on Ottoman street. He is a Democrat in politics, and 
is a member of the Roman Catholic church. Mr. Thomas married in 1892, 
Henrietta Pickert, and seven children were born to them, six of whom are now 
living: Agnes, Marie, William, Frederick, Joseph and Robert. In 1902 Airs. 
Thomas died. In 1903 Mr. Thomas married Susanna Clements, bv whoni he is 
the father of one child, Henrietta. 

HARRY D. COSHEY, of the Henry S. Coshey undertaking and 
livery establishment, of Greensburg, Pennsylvania, was born at Greensburg, 
June 3, 1861, one of the five sons of Air. and Airs. Henry S. Coshey. 



HISTORY OF irESTMORELAXD COUNTY. 107- 

The Coshey family is French. Harry D. Coshey's paternal great-grand- 
father came from France to America at an early day and settled in Millersdale,. 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. He married jMiss Seigfert, by whom one 
child was born, Samuel. She lived to the advanced age of ninety-liiree years. 
The ancestor, Coshey (i), was killed by the falling of a tree, while felling tim- 
ber in Westmoreland county. 

(II) Samuel Coshey, grandfather of Harry D. Coshey, married Elizabeth 
Heasley of this county, who died when eighty-four years of age. He died, 
aged si'xtv-two years. ' They were the parents of ten children : Joseph, died in 
1904, aged seventy-six years; Jacob, Cybilia and Louis, died young; Lebious, 
Lvdia Ann, Henrv S., Ellen, William and Robert, now living. 

(III) Henry's. Coshey, the father of H. D. Coshey, was born February 
18, 1836, four miles from Greensburg. In 1858 he married Elizabeth Everett, 
daughter of John Everett and wife. Anna (Everett) Coshey, died August 24,^ 
1903. aged seventy-two. years. Henry S. Coshey and wife were the parents 
of live sons: Charles, Harry D., John, Edward and William, all of whom, 
are married and all associated with their father in business. The father learned 
the cabinet making trade, and from 1853 to 1858 was employed by others at 
this trade and had much to do as an undertaker. He embarked in business for 
himself in 1858, and continued as a furniture dealer at Greensburg until 1879, 
when he sold the stock and engaged in undertaking and general, livery business, 
in the same city and is still in business, assisted by all five of his sons. In his 
experience as an undertaker, covering more than a quarter of a century, and. 
located in the same block for nearly all this period, he has cared for the remains 
of about ten thousand people. In 1905, with an expansion of the undertaking, 
and livery business, Henry S. Coshey required more room than that affordetL 
by his own pioneer quarters, hence bought the ground at the corner of Penn- 
sylvania avenue and Tunnell street, and erected thereon a spacious brick build- 
ing. It is ninety by one hundred and twentv-five feet on the ground, and three 
stories high. A suite of rooms for undertaking offices and morgue are on the 
first floor, convenient to the street. It is one of the finest business houses in the 
city. Mr. Coshey's livery business is large. He keeps twenty-five horses, for hire,, 
and boards from fifty to seventy-five more. He has ten closed carriages for 
funeral occasions, and three hearses. He counts his patrons by the thousand. 
Beginning in 1858, Mr. Coshey has been a reliable, trustworthy man, who has 
become widelv known in Westmoreland county. Mr. Coshey received a com- 
mon school education and learned the trade which was the foundation of his 
successful business career. The Cosheys, as a rule, are meniljcrs of the Re- 
formed church, and in politics are Democrats. 

(IV) Harry D. Coshey obtained a fair common school training, and 
early engaged in business with his father, and is now in company with his 
brothers, relieving their venerable father of a lifelong responsibility in business 
affairs. He marriefl Carrie Smith, of Greensburg, Pennsylvania. 

CYRUS T. LOXG, among the leading surveyors and most thoroughly 
accurate civil engineers of western Pennsylvania, as well as an ex-county sur- 
veyor of Westmoreland county, w'as born three miles north of Mount Pleasant, 
in Mount Pleasant township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, November 
22, 1840, the son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Tedrow) Long. The American 
ancestor of the Long family was Jacob Long (grandfather), \i'ho was born in 
Wurtemberg, Germany, in 1759. He emigrated to America, served as a team- 



io8 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

ster in the war of the revohition, and came to Westmoreland county in 1803. 
He purchased a farm of one hundred and seventy-five acres near Mount Pleas- 
ant, and died in 1841, at the age of eighty-two years. He had four sons and 
one daughter, all long since deceased. 

Jacob Long (father of Cyrus T. Long) was born in Caernavon township, 
Lancaster county, Peinisvlvania, November 19, 1797, and came with his parents 
to \^'estmoreland county when but six years of age. He was a highly success- 
ful farmer ; a Republican in politics, and a staunch member of the Evangelical 
Lutheran church. In manners, he was a quiet, unassuming man, and died 
September 26, 1871. His wife was Elizabeth Tcdrow, youngest daughter of 
Mr. and Airs. Henry Tedrow, of Fayette county, Pennsylvania. They had two 
children : Cyrus T.[ and Nancy, who married William G. Kell, now deceased. 

Cyrus T. Long received his education in the common public schools, and 
at Sewickley Academy which he attended two and one-half years, when it was 
imder the charge of IVofessors L. Y. C.raham and W. A. Raub. He made a 
specialty of mathematics during his academic course, yet made much jjrogress in 
Greek and Latin studies. He began reading law with Hon. Henry D. Foster 
in 1839, and four vears later went to Johnstown, Pennsylvania, where he com- 
pleted his legal studies with his cousin, Cyrus L. Pershing, who subsequently 
became judge of one of the easteru Peimsylvania counties. In September, 1864, 
Mr. Long was .admitted to the bar of Cambria county, Pennsylvania, and in 
August, 1865. to the bar of Westmoreland county, but he soon forsook that 
prokssion foV what seemed to be more to his natural liking— surveying, which 
profession he had commenced in his boyhood days. He was elected county 
surveyor in Westmoreland county in 1871, and re-elected in 1874. For a score 
of years and more he has been employed by individuals and large corporations 
to do their surveying. He is thoroughly competent in this line, and possesses 
a fine library on the subject, as well as a fine collection of the best standard 
books in literature and science. The universal opinion in this part of the state 
is that he has few equals and no superiors, as a practical engineer and surveyor. 
He married, Julv 8, 1872, Barbara S. Durstine, daughter of Henry Durstine, 
near :\Iount Pleasant. Their children were: i. John D.. born February 12, 
1874; a graduate of Washington and Jeflferson College, with a de- 
gree of Doctor of IMedicine from the University of Pennsylvania. 
For the last four years he has been practicing in the United 
States service at T\l'anila, Philippine Islands. 2. Henry D., born 
March 13, 1876, a medical doctor, who graduated from Johns Hopkins 
University, and now located at Ellis Island, New York, in the service of the 
L^nited States government. 3. Edwin C, born April 13, 1878, attended Wash- 
ington and Jefferson College, but left prior to graduation. When the Spanish- 
American war came on, he enlisted from the college he was attending, as a 
private soldier for one year and was promoted to second lieutenant and served 
as such two vears in the Philippine Islands, came home and was promoted to 
first lieutenant, and is stationed at San Francisco, California. He was appointed 
by President ]\IcKinley. 

Mrs. Long died the last week in December, 1894, greatly mourned_ Ijy a 
well reared family. Mr. Long is still vigorous, and attends to the duties of 
his profession with the same skill and industry, as would one a score of years 
younger. Politically he is a Democrat, but he hqs never taken to campaign 
work, preferring to attend strictly to the calling of his life in which he is a 
master. He has had an active career in his profession, and there are many 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 109 

results of his work in western Pennsylvania. He is a member of the Presby- 
terian church at Greensburg, his home. 

LEONARD J. DUFF. Greensburg recognizes in Leonard J. Duff 
one of the most active and public-spirited of lier citizens. He is a son of John 
Duff, born 2\larch 12, 1810, in Unity township, and married Elizabeth Temple, 
born October 4, 1821, in Westmoreland county. They had children: \'incent 
P., born 1840; John A., born 1842; Agnes, born 1844; Susan, born 1846; Selie, 
born 1849; ^^ary, born 1852; Rosa, born 1854; 2\laggie, born 1856; and 
Leonard J., mentioned hereafter. This large family has lurnished to the com- 
munity many good citizens. 

Leonard j. Duff, son of John and Elizabeth (Temple) Duff, was born 
February 12, 1859, in Unity township, and obtained his education in the com- 
mon schools. He takes an active part in public affairs, and the confidence with 
which he is regarded by his neighbors is sufficiently indicated by the number 
of offices to which they have elected him. He has served four years as supervi- 
sor, the same length of time as township clerk, and is now serving a term of 
three years as auditor. His political affiliations are with the Democrats. He is 
a member of the Roman Catholic church. ]\Ir. Duff married in 1880, Sarah 
Foust, and they have children: Isabel J., born August 16, 1881, wife of Harry 
Lopes; Joseph AL, born July 6, 1883, married Dora AL Shirey ; John A., born 
Alarch 6, 1886; j\Iary A., born January 15, 1890; and Clarence E., born Alay 
30, 1893. The parents of Mrs. Duff were Joseph and Susan (Shaffer) Foust, 
and they had children: Elizabeth, born December 2, 1846; Mary, born April 
6, 1848 ; Julia, born June 20, 1850 ; Susan, born January 26, 1852 ; Sarah, born 
April 2, 1854, and became the wife of Leonard J. Duff, as mentioned above; 
Shaffer, born January 11, 1857; John, born April 13, 1859; and Christian, born 
October 5, 1861. Mrs. Duff is a member of the Lutheran church. 

FAREWELL SKIDMORE. One of the successful men of Greens- 
burg is Farewell Skidmore. He was born October 6, 1848, in Sheffield, Eng- 
land, and is the son of Edward and IMary (Sayles) Skidmore. 

Until reaching the age of thirteen. Farewell Skidmore attended the com- 
mon schools, and then learned the steel smelter's trade. He emigrated, in 1872, 
to the United States, landing in New York on the first day of May in that year. 
He went to Lewistown, Pennsylvania, where he mained three years, and then 
moved to Pittsburg. In that city he was employed for seventeen years in An- 
derson and Wood's Steel works, prospering to such a degree that at the end of 
that time he was able to purchase property in Greensburg, whither he removed. 
He set out a grape vineyard from which be manufactures fourteen varieties of 
wine for which he finds a market in various states of the union, and he also deals 
largely in fruit of all kinds. He married, March 6, 1869, Catherine Melvin, 
and their children were: Mary Ann, born December 29, 1869, died April 9, 
1871 ; Ada, born January 29, 1871 ; Mary, born June 21. 1872, died August i, 
1873; Farewell, born February 10, 1874, died August 17, 1874; Charles, 
born in 1874, died same year ; Farewell Earnest, born June 28, 1875 ; and Lillie, 
born in 1879, died same year. Mrs. Skidmore was the daughter of Thomas ancl 
Mary Melvin, and was born May 10, 1848, in Sheffield, England. Her husband 
and family suffered the affliction of losing her by death Octolx-r 2t^. 1902. 

WILLIAM A. HENSEL. son of Jacob P.. and Mary A. 
(Bash) Hensel was born in Loyalhanna township, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, November 6, 1859, and is descended from German 



•J JO HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

•ancestors who were early settlers in this county. After completing the course 
in the common schools William A. Hensel attended Delmont Academy two 
years. Leaving school at the age of eighteen he taught two terms in Delmont 
and nine terms in the country schools. Following this he was a clerk in a store 
for two years. In 1890 he was elected county editor for three years. After 
completing that service he engaged in the agency business, which he still car- 
ries on. The only society of which he is a member is the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles. He married, August 16, 1883, Margaret J. Thomas, daughter of Major 
Cyrus and Eliza (Ernest) Thomas, born March 6, i860, in Hempfield township. 
They have children: Bertram T., deceased; Cyrus Taylor, deceased; Mable E., 
Sarah ~Sl., and Mary A. 

DAVID M. DENMAN. One of Greensburg's most respected citizens 
is David M. Denman, a son of John and Harriet (Hogland) Denman, born 
July 9, 1833, in Herkimer county, New York. 

David M. Denman received his education in the common schools of his 
native state, and at the age of fifteen began to learn the carriage-maker's trade, 
which he followed for eight years. He then engaged in farming and for eigh- 
teen years devoted himself to this occupation. He kept forty-five cows and car- 
ried on a large dairy business. Deciding finally to relinquish his agricultural 
labors he sold the farm and moved to Greensburg, where he engaged exten- 
sively in the shoe business, conducting a factory and two stores. In 1895 he 
sold the factory and now conducts but one store. He is a Republican in poli- 
tics, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Greensburg. Mr. 
Denman married in 1858, Emma Whiteman, born February 15, 1838, in Spring- 
field, Otsego county. New York, and their children are:'i. Frederick B., who 
lives at Butler, married Julia Bard and has four children: Nelson, Thomas, 
Hancock and John. 2. Everet N., who has always followed the shoe business, 
and is now engaged with his father in Greensburg, married Mary Kuhns, and 
has three children : Rachel K.. David M. and Mary E. 3. Minard R., married 
Metta Roberts, of Moundsville, West Virginia, and has one child, Adelaide. 4. 
Elgirtha. unmarried, and resides at home. 5. Ethel B., wife of J. Frank Beatty, 
■and mother of two children, Elizabeth and Frank. 

JOSEPH FRANKLIN KLINGENSMITH. One of the well-known 
men of Hempfield township is Joseph Franklin Klingensmith. He is the son 
of Joseph Klingensmith, who was born in 1800, in Allegheny township, and 
married Catharine, daughter of Michael Frey, of Unity township. Their chil- 
dren were: Joseph Franklin and Levi Kemp Klingensmith. Mr. Klingensmith, 
the father, died in 1886, in Hempfield township. 

Joseph Franklin Klingensmith, son of Joseph and Catharine (Frev) Kling- 
ensmith, was -born June 20, 1858, in Hempfield township, and received 'his prim- 
ary education in the public schools. He afterward studied for two years at 
Greensburg Seminary, leaving in 1880 in order to devote himself to his chosen 
pursuit of agriculture. In 1890, in partnership with William S. Turney of 
Greensburg, he embarked in the ice and commission business in that town, 'the 
firm being known as Klingensmith & Turney. They were the first to enter 
upon that line of business in their section of the county. Later in the same year 
he purchased the "Gilchrist farm" in Hempfield township, two miles west of 
Greensburg, and decided to lead thenceforth the life of a farmer and stockman. 
Intrusting the care of the interests of the firm to Mr. Turney, he has since de- 
voted himself with marked success to farming and dairying. 'Mr. Klingensmith 



HISTORY OF JJ-ESTMORELAXD COUXTV. jji 

married, October 12, 1882. at Greensburg, Pennsylvania, Margaret M.. daugh- 
ter of John and Alary RntT, of Hemptield township, and they are the parents of 
the following children: Irene Estella, John Mac, Levi Franklin, Mary Naomi 
and Alargaret Josephine, all living. 

B. FRAXKLIX \'OGLE, one of the editors and proprietors of the 
IJ'cstiuorchind Democrat, was born in Greensburg, \\"estmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, May 10, 1854, and is the youngest son of Augustus and Mary 
Ann \'ogle. 

His grandfather, Augustus \ogle, lived and died in Germany, where he 
was in active military service for tifty-six years, during the greater part of 
which he held the high rank of chi^f-of-staff in the army of the Grand Duke of 
Hesse. On his retirement from the army he was signally honored by a ban- 
quet given by the king, who also presented him with a silver tankard on which 
was engraved a befitting inscription as a token of esteem. 

Augustus Vogle (father) was born in the city of Darmstadt, Germany, Oc- 
tober I, 181 5, and was educated in the military institutions of that country. 
Shortly after his graduation he was placed in command of the military post 
at Mayence, on the Rhine, a strongly fortified station of much importance on 
the border between France and Germany. He held the rank of captain, and had 
flattering prospects of high advancement, but owing to some differences with 
his superior officers, and being a firm believer in the Republican form of gov- 
ernment, he resigned his position and cam.e to the United States in 1839, being 
tiien twenty-four years of age. Coming to \\'estmoreland county almost di- 
rectly, he engaged in the tanning business at Greensburg, and soon invented a 
process which so facilitated the art of tanning that results formerly requiring 
nine months were attained in one-fifth of that time. His new process was 
adopted widely throughout the country, and the art of tanning was practically 
revolutionized. He was successfully engaged in the tanning business until his 
sudden death, which resulted from drinking ice water while heated by work ; 
lie died March 9, 1856. Mr. Vogle was a man of literary taste and ability, and 
left behind him a number of sketches and short poems, some of which gave evi- 
dence of much merit. He was one of the founders of Odd Fellowship at 
Greensburg, having organized the first lodge of that place. Decided in his con- 
victions, strong and impulsive in disposition, upright in character and bright 
in intellect, he was a man whose influence for good was felt, and whose im- 
press was necessarily left on his generation. He was a typical blue eyed Ger- 
man, a pronounced Democrat, and an active member of the Lutheran church. 
His wife was Mary Ann, a daughter of Michael Winsheimer, by whom he had 
five children. The Winsheimers originally came to this country from near 
Nuremberg, Germany, at an early period in the historv of Westmoreland 
county. Mrs. Mary .\. Vogle died at lier home in Greensljurg, September 12, 
1892. in the sixty-seventh year of her age. 

B. Franklin \'ogle, a "worthy son of an illustrious sire," received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of Greensburg, and began active life as a printer, 
learning the trade in the office of the Democrat, edited at that time by Edward 
J. Keenan. a distinguished lawyer and noted politician. After comi)lcting his 
trade he and a com.pany of others purchased the equipment of Frank Cowan's 
paper and established, in September. 1875, The Democratic Times, which had 
an existence of two years, Mr. Vogle being the real, and E. J. Keenan, Esq., the 
apparent editor, because of the almost continuous illness of the latter during 
that time. Mr. Vogle became, in 1877, the editor of The Oil Times, owned bv 



112 HISTORY OF iri'.STMORELAND COUNTY. 

James F. Campbell, and published in the aetive oil field town of Edenburg, 
Clarion county, Pennsylvania. A year later he became city editor of Tlic Daily 
Breeze, of Bradford Pennsylvania, which was afterwards merged into an es- 
tablished paper of that place, The Daily Era, of which journal he was for 
three years city and managing editor, and was at the same time the represen- 
tative of the Associated Press for the northern oil region. During that period 
Mr. Vogle was. likewise the special correspondent of that busy petroleum cen- 
tre of several of the leading newspapers of New York and Philadelphia. Mr. 
Vogle removed to Pittsburg early in 1882, and was employed on the staiif of 
The Leader of that city, and also did considerable work for several of the morn- 
ing papers at the same time. He returned to Greensburg in November, 1882, 
and in company with T. R. Winsheimer purchased The Westmoreland Demo- 
crat, wdiich they have ever since edited and published. The Democrat is a live 
weekly Democratic' journal, and circulates largely among the old families of 
the county, being the second paper founded west of the Allegheny mountains, 
having been established on May 24, 1799. Mr. Vogle was the author of an in- 
tesesting and beautifully illustrated history of Greensburg, published by \'ogle 
and Winsheimer in 1899, the centennial anniversary of the incorporation of 
Greensburg as a borough. Mr. Vogle was elected a director of the Greensburg 
school district for terms covering a continuous period of ten years. From June, 
1890, to June, 1900. He was also chosen and served as president of the school 
board for several years. At the regular annual meeting of the Pennsylvania 
State Editorial Association, held at Harrisburg, in January, 1903, Mr. Vogle 
was honored by election as president of the association for the ensuing year. 
He married, June 10, 1901, Minnie Jane Frederick, daughter of John C. Fred- 
erick, fisq., and Mrs. Martha Oliver Frederick, of Irwin. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Vogle has been born a daughter, Alice Augusta Vogle. 

WILLIAM BORLAND NEEL, one of the successful and progres- 
sive business men of the country, was born near Mount Pleasant, Westmore- 
land county, Pennsylvania, January 4, 1826, the only son of Samuel and Rachel 
( Borland)" Neel. He is of pure Irish descent, his ancestors on both sides having 
been natives of north Ireland. The progenitor of the Neel family in America 
was John Neel, who left his native land, sailing for American shores, and lo- 
cated in Dauphin county. He married, and had chijdren : John, William, Rob- 
ert, James, Margaret Cochran, Jane Clark, Eleanor Simpson, and Agnes Flem- 
ing. His death occurred October' 7, 1792, in Dauphin county. Two of his 
sons, John and William, crossed the Allegheny mountains about 1770 and set- 
tled near Mount Pleasant, where they were married to two sisters of Samuel 
Warden, who was residing on the Warden farm one mile west of the present 
borough of Mount Pleasant. 

John Neel, son of John Neel, senior, and grandfather of William Borland 
Neel, was an elder of the Presbyterian church and one of the six who held the 
first meeting of Redstone Presbytery, at Pigeon Creek, Pennsylvania, Sejatem- 
ber 10, 1781. He married. May 23, 1775, Margaret Warden, and their children 
were: Robert, John, Samuel, Eleanor Vance, Margaret, Andrew, Martha Tittle 
and Mary Thompson. 

Samuel Neel, third son of John Neel, Jr., was born in 1785, and was by 
occupation a farmer. He inherited a portion of the home farm and this he 
operated and lived upon until his death. He was industrious and prosperous, 
having in his possession a tract of land comprising one hundred and seventy 
acres located near Mount Pleasant. His political belief was in accordance with 




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HISTORY OF JVESTMORELAXD COUNTY. 113 

the old line Whigs, but after the formation of the Republican party he joined 
that organization. Like his father he was an elder in the Presbyterian church. 

He married, April i, 1812, Ruth Jack, and their children were: Lucinda 
Lytle, and Rev. J. J. Neel, who died February 10, 1852, aged thirty-three years. 
Ruth (Jack) Neel died in 1819, and Mr. Xeel took for his second wife, Rachel 
LJorland, June 25, 1822. She was the daughter of Samuel Borland, who emi- 
grated from Ireland to America settling in "The Manor," Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in farming. He was an officer in the 
Revolutionary war. At the close he married Mrs. Lidia Gregg, at her father's 
home, Winchester, Virginia. They made their home for a few )-ears in Bed- 
ford county, Pennsylvania, before moving to Westmoreland county. He was a 
Presbyterian and married Lydia Gregg, who was born in Winchester, Virginia, 
removing from there to Bedford, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Neel had chil- 
dren : William Borland, of whom later ; Lydia G. ; Ruth Shields : and Margaret 
A., who died November 28, 1884. Samuel Neel died October 28, 1862, at the 
advanced age of seventy-seven years, after a useful and well spent life. His 
wife survived him ten years. 

William B. Neel acquired what education the subscription schools of those 
days afforded, and was reared to agricultural pursuits. Immediately after leav- 
ing the s.chool room he engaged in farming, which occupation he has followed 
ever since, ever being attended with the greatest success in this line, and has 
now in his possession four hundred acres of valuable and fertile farm land, and 
also town property. In about 1859 he engaged in the stock droving business, in 
partnership with William J. Hitchman, continuing in this business for about 
twenty years. :\Ir. Neel was also largely identified with the coal and coke bus- 
iness of East Huntingdon township, and purchased extensive coal lands in West 
Mrginia which he still has in his possession, but which have not vet been de- 
veloped. He was also connected with Mr. Hitchman in the banking and real 
estate business for many years. He was one of the organizers of the" First Na- 
tional Bank of Mount Pleasant in 1865, and is still a director in that institution. 
In politics he is a staunch Republican, and takes the deepest interest in the wel- 
fare of that organization. He is also largely interested in educational pursuits, 
and served in his township for over ten years as school director. In matters' 
of religion Mr. Neel adheres to the principles of the Presbvterian church, the 
denomination of his forefathers. He has been elder of hischurch since 1862, 
and represented the Red Stone Presbytery in the general assembly at Chicago 
m 1877, and again at Saratoga Springs in 1890. Mr. Neel is one of the repre- 
sentative men of :\Iount Pleasant, a leading factor in business circles of that 
place, and a man who by his liberal views, commendable industrv, patient per- 
severance and genial, hospitable disposition, has won the confidence of his busi- 
ness associates and endeared himself to a host of warm and admiring friends. 
A\illiam B. Neel married Nancy J. Hurst, daughter of Nathaniel Hurst, a 
prominent citizen of Fayette county, Pennsvlvania. Their children were : John 
].. a civil engineer, of Greensburg, Pa. ; Samuel, a farmer and contractor, of 
W estmoreland county ; Rachel ; Ella May ; and Sarah H. 

ALEXANDER POOL, of Greensburg. son of William and Eliza 
(Seanor) Pool, was born July 29, 1841, in Hempfield township, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania. His grandfather Pool was a native of Germanv and 
sett ed in America many years ago in Westmoreland countv, where he married 
Polly McAfee, of Irish descent. William Pool and Eliza Seanor were born in 
Hempheld township. 
2—8 



114 HISTORY OF JTESTMORELAXD COUNTY. 

Alexander Pool got such education as the schools of Hempfield afiforded 
fifty years ago. At the age of twenty-one he enlisted in Company JJ, Une Hun- 
dred and Forty-Second Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served 
two years and eleven months. While in the service he was sick two months, and 
was subsequently put on duty in the hospital for four months. After his return 
from the war he went to the oil fields of Pennsylvania where he worked at well 
drilling. Returning to his native township he worked one year for his uncle, 
Samuel Pool on a farm. He followed farming for himself until 1874 when he 
engaged in the mercantile business at Hunkers ten years, then engaged in the 
insurance business for three years. He then purchased a tract of timberlind, 
and for two years was in the lumber business. In 1888 he purchased his pres- 
ent property, being the first lot sold in south Greensburg. He followed team- 
ing one year, then entered the employ of Kelley and Jones, as inspector, remain- 
ing about thirteen years, and one year in the employ of the Hempfield Foun- 
dry -Company. He then retired, and is now enjoying the fruits of his many 
years of industry. Mr. Pool was elected, February 20, 1906, tax collector for 
three years. He married December 25, 1866, Mary Jane Evans, born in Stark 
county, Ohio, April 23, 1837, daughter. of Henry and Hannah (Jones) Evans. 
Their children are: William H., bom October 20, 1867, married Ida Barnhart, 
and they have one child, Vern Pool; 2. Linda May, born June 5, 1868, married 
F. H. Liyers, and their children are: John A., Herbert, Harry, Winifred, Mary, 
Anna and Clift'ord. 

ROBERT A. RANKIN. The Rankin family, of which Robert A. 
Rankin is a member, came to Westmoreland county from Allegheny county 
in 1866. Robert Rankin, the grandfather of Robert A. Rankin, came with his 
family from county Derry, Ireland, in 1837, and settled in Allegheny county. 
The tradition is that four brothers had lived about four miles north of Lon- 
denderry, and that two of them came to America, from one of whom Robert, 
mentioned above, was a descendant. 

John Rankin, Jr., the oldest son of Robert Rankin, was born October 21, 
1821, and came to America as a member of his father's family, as above indi- 
cated, when he was sixteen years old. He was brought up on the farm and in 
his early years learned the tanner's trade, which he abandoned to resume farm- 
ing, to which vocation he has given his entire life. He married in 1845, Eliza 
Jane Kelley, of Allegheny county, a daughter of Samuel Kelley. She died in 
March, 187Q, and was buried in West Newton cemetery. They had nine chil- 
dren : Margaret C, intermarried with J. E. Cunningham, who lives in Ros- 
traver township : Mary E., intermarried with A. G. Cunningham, who lives in 
Johnston county, Missouri ; Martha Jane, intermarried with J. H. Smith, who 
lives in Rostraver township: Samuel Stewart, deceased; Robert A., referred to 
hereafter ; Eliza Ann, unmarried and living at their home ; John C, intermarried 
with Annie Culbert : \^''illiam J., intermarried with Mollie Stevens, who lives 
in Rostraver township; and Sallie B., intermarried with John Rader, who lives 
in McKeesport. John Rankin, Jr., their father, although now past four score 
years and four, is yet living and in good health on the old homestead in Ros- 
traver township. 

-Robert A. Rankin was born May 8, 1857, and brought up as a farmer. He 
entered the common schools and later spent three years in Jefferson Academy, 
Cannonsburg, Pennsylvania, after which he returned home and engaged in 
farming. He was thus engaged until i88q when he was appointed clerk in the 
prothonotary's office under John Rial. In June, i88g, he married Margaret 




(K^4-^^ ^^ 



HISTORY OF U hSTMOKELAND COb'XTV. 115 

Uelle l-"inle\-, of Rostra ver township, a daughter of Thomas G. and EHzabeth 
T. Finley. ' Her ancestors were early settlers in the county. Her great-grantl- 
lather was Rev. lames Finley, who assisted in organizing and was the first 
pastor of the oklRehobeth Church in Rostraver township, a church so noted 
m W estmoreland history. Among her family were other noted men : Rev. 
Samuel Finlev, president of Princeton College in 1776; and Samuel Finley 
Breese :\Iorse, the inventor of the electric telegraph. Robert A. Rankin was 
also clerk in the prothonotary's office under R. A. Hope, and was deputy pro- 
thonotarv under Lewis Thompson. He was elected prothonotary of Westmore- 
land county in November, 1897, and filled the office in 1898, 1899 and 1900. In 
April, 1900, on the organization of the Westmoreland Savings & Trust Com- 
pany of Greensburg, he was elected assistant secretary and treasurer of the in- 
stitution, and filled that position until September, 1903, when the governor ap- 
pointed him register of wills and clerk of the Orphans' court to succeed Samuel 
C. Stevenson, deceased. At the close of his term of appointment he was 
elected to the same position in 1905 by a majority over his opponent of 7823 
votes. He has been president of the First National Bank of \\'ebster since 
its organization, and all these positions he has filled with credit to himself and 
friends. Since coming to America the Rankins have been energetic and active 
in politics. The older members of the family were Whigs, who became Re- 
publicans upon the birth of that party. Robert A. Rankin has been twice elected 
chairman of the Republican committee, in 1900 and 1901, in which campaigns 
the partv was successful, the majorities reaching from 4000 to 6000. For the 
last sixteen vears he has been a resident of Greensburg. Both he and his wife 
were communicants of the old Rehobeth Church in Rostraver township before 
coming to Greensburg, since which time they have been members of the West- 
minster (Presbyterian) Church of Greensburg, of which Mr. Rankin has been 
a trustee and treasurer for many years. 

JOHN GUY, a well known citizen of Greensburg, Pennsylvania, and 
the possessor of a large farm which is justly prized for the size, variety and. 
quality of its products, is a descendant of good Irish stock, as are many of the 
sturdy farmers of that vicinity. 

\\'illiam Guy, father of John Guy, was born in Ireland, in 1794, and emi- 
grated to the United States in 1820, locating in Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania. William Guy became identified with the Democratic party, and was 
a member of the Episcopal church. He was a weaver by trade, but took up the 
occupation of farming in Hempfield township, Pennsylvania. He married 
(first) in Ireland, and had two children: .\ daughter who remained in Ireland 
when her father came to America: Richard, born November i, i8r6, who came 
with his father to .America, and died in 1873. Richard Guy married Catherine 
.-\llshouse, of Hempfield township, and the\- were the parents of seven children, 
as follows: Mary, Samuel, Henr>-, Hester, Josephine, Sarah, and Frank, who 
lives in Kansas. W'illiam Guy married ("second) in 1824. Sarah Frazer. of Se- 
wickley township, Pennsylvania, and they had ten children, as follows: i. Eliza- 
beth, born February 6, i82r). married Ro1)crt McCiill, of Hemj)field townshiji, 
Pennsvlvania. and had five children : I'rank, Elizabeth. .Alexander. .Annie, and 
Irwin. Airs. AIcGill died in 1875. 2. James, born September 9, 1827, married 
Alattie Rortz, and had the following children : William. .Sarah, i^ichard, Joseph, 
James. .Andrew, Irwin, Jennie, and Adelia. 3. Susanna, born April 27, 1829, 
married Jonas Bortz, and they were the parents of nine children, four of whom 
died within a period of three weeks of diphtheria. Their only children now 



Ii6 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



living are: Albert, Annie, and Elizabeth. 4. William, born April 8, 1S31, 
married Hannah Kepple, and had one child, Henry j\l., a carriage and wagon 
manufacturer in Greensburg, Pennsylvania. 5. Jacob, born June 7, 1833, mar- 
ried (first) Catherine Long, and they had one child, Elmer, a carpenter. Jacob, 
married (second) Catherine Kistler, and they had the following children: Aiil- 
ton, Cora, Lydia, Sarah, Grace, Ettie, Jesse, Robert. 6. Sarah Jane, born 
^larch 10, 1836, married \Villiam Nipple, and had five children: Alary, Edward, 
Oliver, Ellen, Emery. 7. John, of whom later. 8. Henry, born April 5, 1841, a 
stone mason by trade, and has helped to build many of the most important of 
the public buildings in Greensburg, Pennsylvania ; among these may be men- 
tioned the old Greensburg Academy, the Greensburg Seminary, the Masonic 
Hall, and others. Mr. Guy is a member of the Second Lutheran Church of 
Greensburg, and is a Democrat. He married, November 19, 1868, Mary Anna 
Small, daughter of John Small, who was a farmer of Hempiield township. Mr. 
and Mrs. Henry Guy were the parents of three children: Ella L. Melissa, John 
and William. Ella L. Melissa was born July 10, 1869, married Frank Shuey, a 
farmer of Hempfield township, and they had three children : Elsie, Edna and 
Charles. John was born April 23, 1873, married Susan Allshouse, a daughter 
of Reuben Allshouse, of Berry. They had one child, Helen. John Guy lost his 
life as the result of an explosion in the Edgar Thompson steel works at Brad- 
dock, December 26, 1904. William was born March 29, 1876, married Sarah 
Shuey, a daughter of John M. Shuey, a farmer and thresher of Heiupfield 
township, g. Anna, born June 21, 1843. She married (first) William Keppler, 
and they had two children : Margaret Sarah and John. Mr. Keppler died in 
1870, and his widow married Elijah J. Bricker and they have one child, Harry 
Bricker. 10. Agnes, born March 5, 1846, married Henry Piper, of Jeannette, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and they have three children, as follows : 
Emma, George, and Willliam. 

John Guy, fourth son and seventh child of William an<l Sarah ( Erazer) 
Guy, was born in Hempfield township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
February 27, 1839. He was brought up on his father's farm and received a 
good education, attending the common schools. He then learned the trade of a 
mason and plasterer, and has followed this occupation all his life in connection 
with the cultivation of his farm, which is very extensive. For some years, 
however, his time has been devoted almost exclusively to the farming industry, 
as was made necessary by the increased size of the crops, which was due to his 
progressive methods. Mr. Guy is always on the lookout for new and improved 
farming machinery and methods, and is ready to give them a fair and practical 
trial. As a result of this his farm is in excellent condition, and the yield of all 
crops — wheat, corn, oats, potatoes, etc. — is abundant beyond measure. His 
farm consists of a choice tract of forty acres. Mr. Guy is always ready to lend 
his assistance to any movement which will tend to the improvement or advance- 
ment of the community in which he lives. He married in 1862, Mary Elizabeth 
Kelly, daughter of John Kelly, a farmer of Hempfield township, I-'ennsvlvania. 
Mr. and Mrs. Guy had one child, Ida, who died in 1875. 

HENRY M. GUY. only child of \\'illiam and Hannah (Kepple) Guy, 
was born November 23, i860, in Hempfield township, Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, and is a well known carriage and wagon maker of Greensburg, 
Pennsylvania. Mr. Guy is of Irish descent, and a full account of his ances- 
try is given in the jireceding sketch. William Guy, father of Henrv M. Guv, 
was born April 8, 183 1, was reared on a farm, educated in the common schools. 




^. oJ^jk^ 



-e/r^ 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 117 

engaged in farming and in connection with this pursuit, engaged in carpenter 
work with his brother Richard. He followed farming and carpentering in 
Hempfield township until :\Iarcli 25, 1880, when he removed to Greensburg. He 
is a member of the Zion Lutheran church, and in politics is a Democrat. He 
married Hannah Kepple, and they had one son, Henry J\I. 

Henrv ^l. Guy received his education in the public schools of Hempfield 
township, and at the age of seventeen years closed his school life. He re- 
mained on the old homestead and acted as assistant to his father in the manifold 
duties of farm life. He continued this for about one year, and in the spring of 
1880 moved to Greensburg and entered into a business engagement with the 
Pennsvlvania Railroad Company for one year. He then came to the conclusion 
that the wagon making field held out better prospects of success for the future. 
He engaged in this line of business, and has now ( 1906) continued it for a per- 
iod of twenty-four years, with an unvaried degree of success. He is a member 
of Camp Xo! 18, W. W. He married, ?ilay 30, 1891, Anna M. Johnson, daugh- 
ter of John and ilartha (Anderson) Johnson, bom in Unity township, near 
Youngstown, Pennsylvania, November 4, i860. JNIr. Guy is a member of the 
Lutheran church, and }ilrs. Guy of the Reformed church of Greensburg, Penn- 
sylvania. 

SA:\IUEL DILLINGER, a leading man of affairs in the early de- 
velopment of \\'estmoreland county, was a native of Pennsylvania, born in East 
Huntingdon township. Westmoreland county, October 28, 1810. He was of 
German descent in both parental lines. Daniel Dillinger, his father, was born 
in the eastern part of Pennsylvania, August 6, 1787, and while yet a boy crossed 
the Allegheny mountains and located in Westmoreland county, near Bethany. 
Here he was brought up on a farm, and when he arrived at manhood married 
Mary Myers, a daughter of Samuel Myers. Their children were : Samuel, 
Christian. Joseph, Jacob, Abraham. Daniel, Elizabeth (married Alexander 
Myers), Sarah, (married Michael Sheets), and Mary, married John Billheimer. 
Daniel Dillinger lived in the vicinity of Bethany until his death, which occurred 
February 9. 1847, ^t the age of fifty-seven years, his widow surviving him 
twenty-six years. After her husband's death she lived with her son Samuel, at 
the home farm, where she died June 19, 1871, aged eighty-one years. The 
husband and wife were buried in the Mennonite cemetery, at Alverton, West- 
moreland county. 

Samuel Dillinger, eldest child of Daniel and Mary (Myers) Dillinger, was 
brought up on the parental farm, and received but a limited education. Early 
in life he was employed by Martin Stauffer, near Jacolj's Creek, where he 
learned the business of distilling. He married Sarah Loucks in 1831, and soon 
after they purchased and located on what is now known as the "Home farm," 
near Alverton. Their children were : Annie, married Joseph Hixson ; Mary, 
married Abraham Sherrick : Catherine, married Moses Hixson ; Sarah, married 
Jacob C. Fox: John L., married Mary Mclntire; Elizabeth L., married C. T. 
Hanna; Eliza L.. married A. A. Plasson ; Daniel L. ; and .Samuel L., married 
Katie Hutchinson. 

Samuel Dillinger followed the business of farming, buying and selling cat- 
tle and horses, etc. He had for some years a large Conestoga wagon with six 
horses, with which he traversed the National Pike, transporting merchandise 
between the cities of Pittsburg and Baltimore. He subsequentlv engaged in 
contract work, building school houses and churches, and other edifices. He was 
an untiring worker for the free school system, and was an efficient memlKT of 



ii8 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

the board of school directors for man}- years. In his prosperity he added liy pur- 
chase additional farms adjoining his "Home farm," vmtil he owned upward of 
six hundred acres in one body, all of which was underlaid with Connellsville 
coking coal. In addition to his farming interests, about 1850 he purchased a 
custom grist mil! in old Bethany, and soon afterward erected in connection with 
the mill a distillery, both of which he operated successfully for about thirty 
vears, until 1881, when they were entirely destroyed by fire. The following- 
year, with his two sons, Daniel L. and Samuel L., he built a new distillery at 
Ruff"s Dale, in Westmoreland county, which until his death was successfully 
operated under the firn-i name of S. Dillinger and Sons. The business has been 
continued by his sons up to the present day, and is one of the largest and best 
known in the state of Pennsylvania. It has a daily capacity of five hundred 
bushels of grain, or a product of fifty barrels, and has six warehouses with a 
combined storage capacity of fifty-five thousand barrels of whisky. With his 
sons, in 1872, he erected a number of coke ovens at Hawkeye, and in 1879 
extended the coke business by the erection of additional coke ovens at Tarr and 
Pennsville, and later with the McClure Coke Company at Alverton, the latter 
being known as the Donnelly plant. Dillinger and Sons are therefore entitled 
to rank among the pioneer coke operators of Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Dillinger's activities were also extended to important interests in other 
directions. He was one of the projectors of the Southwest Pennsylvania Rail- 
way in 1871, and served upon the directorate for some years. As a business 
man he was distinguished for the order with which he conducted all of his af- 
fairs, for his firmi-iess and decision, promptness, great energy and punctuality. 
He was gentle to his employees, and straightforward in all his dealings. As a 
citizen he was what his character would indicate as a business man, and which 
commanded for him the highest respect of his fellow citizens. He was public 
spirited and zealous in politics. During the administration of President Buch- 
anan and prior to that time, he was affiliated with the Whig party. While he 
was opposed to slavery, he was also opposed to confiscation and the Civil war, 
believing that slavery would terminate its own existence by the education of the 
people to the fact that it was wrong, and that this course would at the same 
time better prepare the slaves for their freedom. In this, like all his other mo- 
tives, he was conscientious in what he believed, and naturally united with the 
Democratic- party. He was never an aspirant for political office, but always ad- 
vocated the nomination of the one whom he thought to be best qualified for the 
position. He was an honest man, and never feared to express the convictions 
of his conscience. He was a constant friend and neighbor, and was ever ready 
and willing to lend a helping hand to the weak and erring or downtrodden. His 
last illness was paralysis coming upon him suddenly, and from which he never 
regained consciousness. He died August 25, 1889, at the age of seventy-nine 
years. He was buried in the Mennonite cemetery, at Alverton. His bereaved 
widow, Sarah, to whose energy, faithfulness and frugality a large portion of 
his prosperity may be attributed, survived him about nine years, during which 
time she made her home with her son, Daniel L. Dillinger, at Greensburg, 
Pennsylvania. She died August 19, 1898, in the ninetieth year of her age. 
She w-as buried by the side of her husband in the Mennonite cemetery, at Al- 
verton, Pennsylvania. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON HOWELL, one of the progressive busi- 
ness men of Greensburg, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, engaged in the 
heating, ventilating and tinning trade and kindred branches, is a representative 
in the present generation of an old Westmoreland family. 



HISTORY OF JVESTMORELAXD COUNTY. 119 

William Howell, father of George Washington Howell, was born in West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania. He was for many years a farmer, and then 
engaged in the occupation of transporting coal on boats down the Ohio river. 
He was thus engaged at the time of his death. His bodv was found floating 
in the ^lonongahela river, at Port I'crry. February 12. 1857. His pockets had 
been turned inside out, and a murderous blow on the side of his head left little 
doubt as to the manner and cause of his death. He married in 1847, Elizabeth 
Michaels, born in 1832, daughter of John and Mary Alichaels, of Westmore- 
land county. They had three children that grew to maturity : Josiah, George 
Washington, of whom later: Julia. In 1859 Mrs. Howell married John ^le- 
haffey, and had three children : Thomas, James, .\nnie. She was a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church of Greensburg. Pennsylvania, and died Febru- 
ary 26, 1905. 

George Washington Howell, second son and child of William and Eliza- 
beth (Michaels) Howell, was born in Braddock's Field, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, November 30, 1852. He was the first child born in the house 
which stood close to the spring where, tradition says. Braddock took his last 
drink and where Washington took command. In memory of this he was given 
the name of George Washington. He was reared and educated partly in Alle- 
gheny and partly in Westmoreland county, attending the common schools of 
Wilkinsburg in the former county, and those of Cavettsville in the latter. In 
1871 he went to work for James F. Ryan to learn the tinsmith trade. He fol- 
lowed this business all his life, having made it a profitable one. He' worked in 
Pittsburg and Wilkinsburg. Allegheny county, and in Greensburg. Westmore- 
land county, being foreman for the following firms in the hardware business : 
Shields & Mechling; Turney Brothers; and D. W. Bortz & Brothers. In 1899 
he established himself in business in the same line, making a specialty of tinning 
and heating by means of hot air. He has made a decided success, being very 
methodical and systematic in his manner of conducting his business, and in the 
execution of orders entrusted to him. His political faith is pinned to the Dem- 
ocratic party, of which he is a staunch adherent. He is a member of Zion Re- 
formed church. He is also a member of the following organizations : Greens- 
burg Council, Xo. 44, R. A., and J. O. U. A. 'SI. He married (first), June 26, 
1873, Jennie Alexandria, born March 20, 1852, in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, 
daughter of Thomas and Sarah Alexandria. Mrs. Howell was a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church of Greensburg. Pennsylvania, and died there 
February 27, 1887. The children of George W. and Jennie (Alexandria) 
Howell were: Frank ^^■illian1, born March 29, 1874; Clyde ^Nlarsells, June 28, 
1880; Mabel Lorcn, .\pril 24, 18S2. Mr. Howell married (second) Julv 19, 
18S8. Emma C. Smith, born January 30. 1859, in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, 
daughter of John and Xancy Smith, of East End. Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
John Smith, born in Reading, February 9, 1826, died July 11, 1885, was a tailor 
by trade and followed that occujjation for a number of years in Greensburg be- 
fore removing to East End, Pittsburg, in 1881. His wife, Nancy Smith, born 
December 31. 1824, died April 29, 1883. By his second marriage Mr. Howell 
had three children : George Wilber. born January 8. 1896 : Clarence Smith, De- 
cember 4. 1897: Mary Edna, Xovembcr 2. 1899. 

JAMES LAYTOX RUFFXER. Among Greensburgs busy busi- 
ness men is James L. Ruffner. who represents the "Singer." Illinois and Do- 
mestic Sewing Machine Companies in this part of Pennsylvania. 

His grandfather, Simon Peter Ruffner, (I ) of German descent, was among 



120 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



tlic very early settlers in Derry township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. 
He died aged about sixty years. His wife was Jane Layton, who was of an 
Irish family at the village of Derry. The children born to Simon Peter and 
Jane (Layton) Ruffner were: Nancy, married Daiiiel iMurray ; John, married 
Catherine Geary ; Sarah and Mary (twins) ; Sarah married Charles Larkins and 
Mary married Joseph Miller; James, of whom later. 

II. James Ruffner (father), born September 9, 1835, in Derry township, 
died March, 1904, in same township. He was a prosperous farmer and at his 
death owned several big farms. He was in politics a Democrat, and belonged to 
the Roman Catholic church as did also his family. He served as supervisor of 
Derry township. He married, November 25, 1856, Elizabeth Bridge, born Oc- 
tober 24, 1835, the daughter of John and Elizabeth (Stahl) Bridge, of German 
descent. She died suddenly of heart failure, June 30, 1904, and is buried be- 
side her husband in the Catholic cemetery at Blairsville, Pennsylvania. Their 
children were: Catherine Jane, born August 20, 1857, niarried Albert Short; 
James Layton, born December 27, i860, of whom later; Annie Elizabeth, born 
June 17, 1862, married Samuel Connor, of Derry township; John E., born De- 
cembiT 26, 1864, married Zora Enfield; Mary, born September 2, 1866, married 
Charles F. Ehalt, hotel proprietor at Greensburg, Pennsylvania ; Elizabeth and 
Peter, died in infancy; Margaret and Agnes (twins), born June 9, 1872; Mar- 
garet, married William Kilgore, and Agnes married John W. Luther ; Sarah 
Gertrude, born September 3, 1875, married Harry Fisher, of Derry township. 

III. James L. Ruffner, born December 27, i860, son of James and Eliza- 
beth (Bridge) Ruft'ner, II, received a common school education in Derry town- 
ship, Westmoreland count)-, Pennsylvania, and later attended the academy at 
Blairsville, Pennnsylvania. After leaving the school room, full of laudable am- 
bition, he engaged with the Singer Sewing Machine Company as salesman. 
First he was stationed at Greensburg, Pennsylvania, but after one year was sent 
to LTniontown, Pennsylvania, where he managed the agency for the well known 
company for a period of fifteen years. He then returned to Greensburg, 
where he has been located the past eight years. Besides his Singer sewing ma- 
chine business he has been active in many other lines. Since 1902 he has been 
a wholesale agent for the Illinois Sewing Machine Company, wdiose factory is 
at Rockford. Illinois. While never neglecting his duties in the role of whole- 
sale and retail machine salesman, he has dealt in real estate and been connected 
with building and loan companies both here and in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. 
He was the manager for the Washington National Loan Association 
of Washington. District of Columbia, for three years. He also 
helped organize and build two large brewing- plants, one at Ha- 
gerstown, Maryland, and one at Shire Oaks, Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, both of which became successful and which he has 
disposed of some time since. He has erected several residences and now owns 
the commodious one in which he lives at No. 637 East Pittsburg street, Greens- 
burg, Pennsylvania. He also owns the Commercial Hotel property at Scott- 
dale, Westnioreland county. During the winter of 1905-6 he went to Florida 
anil there spent some two months, during which time he invested in a fine 
O'-ange grove near DeLand, Volusia county, Florida. He also has in embryo 
the erection of a brewing plant at Jacksonville, Florida. 

Politically Mr. Ruffner is an independent Democrat, always supporting the 
best man, but everything being equal votes the Democratic ticket. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Ruffner are members of the Greensburg Roman Catholic church. 

He married, June 2. 1887, Annie E. Ehalt, daughter of Jacob and Lydia 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY . 121 

Ehalt, of Greensburs- Their children are: Charles E., born February 29, 
1S88:' Tames Lawrence, born January 17, 1890, died aged one year and a half; 
Elizabeth Lvdia. born Julv 29, 1893 ; Victor Leo, born July 23, 1895 ; a son and 
dauirhter (twins), borii February 22, 1898, died in infancy; John Elmer, born 
February 21. 1899; Ralph Benedict, born August 22, 1901 ; Philip, born ]May 
30, 1904, died June 14, 1904; Anthony Chrysostom James Regis, born Oc- 
tober 31, 1905. 

• CHALMERS RAMALEY, one of the successful men of Pennsyl- 
vania, and a resident of Greensburg, \\'estmoreland county, was born June 6, 
1873, the son of Jacob and Susanna R. (Cutchell) Ramaley. Jacob Ramaley 
was born atout 1829. He was by occupation a millwright, and in the practice 
of his trade contributed liberally to the development of the milling industry in 
Westmoreland county. He married Susanna R. Cutchell, daughter of Parmenus 
Cutchell, and their children were: :\Iurray, P. A., Dr. E. R., I\L J., Ida M., 
IMolly B.. Blanch ^L, and Chalmers. 

Chalmers Ramaley is one of the energetic and prosperous business men in 
the county. He is an architect of ability, and owns a sawmill, several excellent 
farms that are worked for him by tenants, and other farms that he buys for the 
standing timber, after the removal of which he sells them and buys others, in 
the regiilar course of his business. Air. Ramaley is now building a large barn, 
one of the best in the county in point of construction, as it will also be in appoint- 
ments when finished. Its location will be convenient to the farms he owns, and 
will comfortably house the dozen or more working horses and the other farm 
products. Mr. Ramaley contemplates the building of a house for his family 
which though simple in architecture, will be one of the finest residences in the 
county. On the hill near the ground upon which this house is to be erected is 
a spring of excellent w^ater. It is high above the house and barn, and Mr. 
Ramaley will build a reservoir to supply them with water and to furnish power 
for electric lighting and such light machinery as will make housework and the 
feed and care of stock most convenient. Mr. Ramaley married, February 8. 
1900. Xora M. Young, daughter of Xorman C. Young, and their children are : 
Susan, born September 14, 1901 ; Chalmers E., February i, 1902: and Simon 
Stack, March 27, 1904. 

JOHN HARGNETT was descended from a family that had settled 
in the L'nited States before the Revolution. He was of the third generation 
in descent from the pioneer ancestor who came from Germany. 

(I) Jacob Hargnett, the grandfather of John Hargnett. and the founder 
of the Hargnett family, was born in Germany, December 23, 1736. He was still 
a young tnan when he came to America and settled near Hagerstown, Mary- 
land. He remained there a few years and then removed with his family to 
Westmoreland county, where he took up land in the Ligonier valley about 1770. 
The hostility of the Indians, however, compelled him. as it had many other 
pioneers, to abandon tliis home in a very short time. Tie accordingly returned 
to Maryland, where lie lived for the next eight years. When peace had in some 
deerree been established on the western border, he returned to tlic Ligonier 
valley and asfain settled on lands he had previously occupied. This was situ- 
ated about two miles southwest of Fort Ligonier, and is yet in the possession of 
some of his descendants. At that time the fort was garrisoned and served as 
a place of refuere for all pioneers ^yithin reach of it in times of Indian invasions. 
Mr. Harsrnett lived on this farm until his death, which occurred at tlie advanced 



122 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



age of ninety years, in 1826. His widow, Barbara, survived him but one year, 
and they are both buried in the Brant cemetery near their former home. I'heir 
children were : Frederick, Ester and Sarah.- 

(II) Frederick Hargnett, son of Jacob (i) and Barabra Hargnett, was 
born in Hagerstown. Maryland, in 1774, and was brought to Ligonier when his 
parents removed to that section. He was a farmer by occupation, and suc- 
ceeded to the land taken up by his father. In 1803 he married Catharine Tosh, 
and they had eight children: Jacob, born in 1805; Henry, born July 10, 1807; 
Christina, born March 20, 1809, intermarried with Jacob Miller; John," born 
April 13, 181 1 ; Ann, born August 7, 1813, intermarried with Samuel King; 
David, born August 17, 1818; Elizabeth, born September 21, 1821, intermarried 
with Peter Myers; Sarah, born January, 1824, intermarried with J. M. Rren- 
iser. All of the above family of Frederick Hargnett are dead. In politics 
Frederick Hargnett was a Democrat, and in religious faith a member of the 
German Reformed church. He died May 3, 1845, and his widow survived 
him until February 15, 1871. 

(III) John Hargnett, the third son of Frederick (II) and Catharine 
Tosh Hargnett, was born April 13, 181 1. His constitution being a delicate one, 
he left the farm in 1830 and became a clerk in a store in Ligonier. Two years 
later he established himself in the mercantile business there, wliich he conducted 
personally until old age compelled him to retire from its active duties. He was 
for forty years associated in business with John T. McGowan. It was his cus- 
tom to make two trips each year to Philadelphia or Baltimore, one in the spring 
and the other in the fall, to replenish their stock of goods for the coming season. 
These journeys as a rule were made in stage coaches, but at times they were 
made on horseback. In either case he was obliged to carry with him the money 
to be paid for the goods purchased, and this was no light weight, since it was 
useless with the paper money of that day to attempt to pay in anything but gold 
or silver. He made these trips regularly in this manner for twenty years, until 
the completion of the Pennsylvania railroad rendered such long turnpike jour- 
neys unnecessary. Nothing delighted him more, in his declining years, than to 
talk of these old-time customs, and his conversation was always fraught with 
interest and instruction. In politics he was a Democrat, casting his first presi- 
dential vote for Andrew Jackson in 1832. In 1834 he was appointed postmas- 
ter of Ligonier under President Jackson's administration, and held this office, 
though not consecutively, for a period of twenty-seven years. In 1863 he was 
elected by his party as a member of the legislature. He united with the Metho- 
dist church in Ligonier, 1830, and was one of its most active members until his 
death. For more than a quarter of a century, ending in June. 1870. he was 
superintendent of the Ligonier Methodist Episcopal Sunday school, which he 
helped to found when a young man. 

-In 1836 he married Susan, a daughter of David .\rmor. She died in 1848. 
They had two children: Pamelia, born in 1837, and a son Armor, born 1843, 
who lived but fourteen months, dying in 1844. Pamelia was educated at the 
Blairsville Seminary, now known as Blairsville College, and was an honor 
member of its first graduating class. She married, June 28, 1858, Dr. L. T. 
Beam, of Ligonier, and died July 31, 1859. Dr. Beam afterwards removed to 
Johnstown and perished in the flood of 1889. In 1850 John Hargnett married 
Laura Piatt, daughter of William Piatt, of Berlin, Pennsylvania. She lived 
but on year. In 1854 he married Euphemia Bernetta, daughter of James and 
Catherine Carnahan McDonald, of Indiana countw The McDonalds, as their 
name indicates, came from Scotland. John, the first American ancestor, was a 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 123 

son of John and Isabella McCartney McDonald, who lived near Edinburgh, and 
a grandson of John ^McDonald, a captain in the Scottish army. In 1772 John 
?vlcDonald, the grandson, when a young man, visited his relatives in Rich Hills, 
county of Armagh, Ireland. While there a company was formed consisting of 
himself and sixteen other young men, three of whom were his cousins, and they 
:dl came to America, landing at Baltimore. When the Revolutionary war broke 
out John enlisted in Captain Casper Weitsell's company, First Battalion Rifle 
Regiment from Pennsylvania. He rose to the rank of captain of the Flying 
Camp and served through the war. Before entering the army he was married 
tc Jane Wilson, and at its close settled on the lands which he had taken up ih 
k'ork county, w-here they resided until his death more than twenty years after- 
ward. They had nine children, one of whom, James, born in 1779, married 
Catharine Carnahan, and settled in Indiana county. He was a farmer by oc- 
cupation, and a Presbyterian in religion, though late in life he united with the 
3Iethodist Episcopal church of which his family were already members. He 
died April 20, 1852. They had a family of ten children : John, James, Samuel, 
Alexander, Elizabeth, Mary, Jane, Nancy, Susan and Euphemia Bernetta, the 
last of whom became the wife of John Hargnett, as above indicated. To them 
were born two daughters, Wilhelmina Piatt and May Idona, both of whom were 
sent to the Pittsburg Female College, May being graduated in one of its latter 
classes before it was destroyed by fire and merged with Beaver College. Wil- 
helmina P. married, August, 1880, Dr. John S. Carman, of Berlin, Pennsyl- 
vania. They have four children living, namely, John Hargnett, May Idona, 
Ralph and Lorena. For some years before his death Mr. Hargnett was not en- 
gaged in active business. In April, 1896, he had an mifortunate accident, fall- 
ing and fracturing his hip joint, the eiTects of which finally caused his death on 
June 13, 1896. He was buried in the \'alley cemetery. His wadow resides in 
Ligonier. 

JAMES C. HENRY. One of the most capable and enterprising 
business men of Westmoreland county, and a man prominentlv identified with 
all community afifairs is James C. Henry. He was born in Derry township. 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, February 25, 1858, son of Conrad J. and 
Catherine (Gary) Henr_\-, and grandson of Conrad Henry. His grandfather- 
removed to Westmoreland county, when his son Conrad was but a small boy. 
He located in Unity township, near Yoimgstow'n, where he built and operated 
a still house for a number of years. He subsequently sold this property- and 
jjurchased a farm in Derry township, where he resided up to the time of his 
death. Prior to the advent of the railroads, Mr. Henry was one of the best 
known teamsters operating from Baltimore and Pittsburg, owning and running 
some three or four six-horse teams. 

Conrad Henry, Jr., father of James C. Henry, was reared at home, and in 
his young manhood drove one of his father's teams, and had charge of the teams 
while on the road. With the coming of the railroads, however, and the conse- 
quent abandoning of teams as a means of transportation, young Mr. Henry was 
out of employment, so having a strong liking for farming he jnirchased a farm 
in Derry township, Westmoreland county, which he ojierated and on which he 
resided until his death. In politics Mr. Henry was a staunch Democrat. He 
married Catherine Gary, and five children were born to them, three of whom 
survive : James C, of whom later ; Edward S., in the employ of James C. ; and 
Joseph L., manager of the oil fields of Beaumont, Texas, for James M. Guflfey, 
of Pittsburg. After the deatli of his wife Mr. Hcnrv married Anna A. Downey, 



124 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

of Cresson, Cambria county, Pennsylvania. She was a model mother and the 
idol of her step-children. Five children were born,, as follows : Mary A. ; 
Emma, wife of James E. Brennon, Latrobe ; Charles J., Greensburg: Frank X., 
Greensburg: and Harry V., in the office of the superintendent of the Southern 
Pacific Railway, California. Mr. Henry died when he was fifty-four years of 
age, and his wife sold the farm and removed to Greensburg, where she now re- 
sides at her home on West Otterman street. 

James C. Henry, son of Conrad Henry, Jr., was reared at home, and was 
educated in St. Vincent's Monastery in Westmoreland county. At the age of 
sixteen he removed to Maryland, where he was engaged in managing a farm for 
Charles McFadden. Mr. Henr}' continued in the management of this large 
plantation of three hundred and sixty acres for three years. After this time he 
returned to Westmoreland county, where he superintended the farm of Mrs. 
George Braden in Berry township for four years, then removing to Greensburg 
where he was engaged for four years in overseeing the farm of the Sisters of 
Charity at Seaton Hill. He then formed a copartnership with Frank Peifley, and 
under the firm name of Peifley & Henry conducted a general drayage business, 
which proved cj[uite successful. Three years later he sold his interest to hi;.^ 
partner and entered into the plumbing business with John Walker, which he 
continued for two years. In November, 1892, Mr. Henry became one of the 
organizers and was made president of the Greensburg Coal & Ice Com]:)any, 
limited. In 1901 the name of the company was changed to the Westmoreland 
Ice Company, of which Mr. Henry was president, manager and one of the di- 
rectors, all of which offices he still holds. In 1903 he organized the Henry & 
Sheffler Machine Company, handling a full line of boilers, engines and pumps, 
and is treasurer of this company. Mr. Henry may well count his career in the 
business world one of success and credit. His industry, perseverance, and 
energy, also the straightforward, upright manner in which all his business 
dealings have been conducted have won a high place for him in the world of 
business and made him one of the best known merchants in Westmoreland 
county. As a citizen he holds the esteem and respect of his fellow townsmen, 
and his afifable and genial disposition have won for him many friends. Politi- 
cally Mr. Henry is a staunch Democrat, and in religious matters he is a devout 
member of the Roman Catholic church. He is a member and trustee of Amer- 
icus Lodge, and a member of the Grand Fraternity. 

JOHN L. SHIELDS, owner and editor of the Mount Pleasant Jour- 
nal, was born near Salem, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, June 6, 1857, a 
son of Matthew and Sarah (Larimer) Shields. During his active working 
life Matthew .Shields followed the occupation of farming, but is now living a re- 
tired life. 

John L. Shields obtained his education in the Chamljersbnrg Academy and 
Princeton College, entering the latter institution in 1876, and retiring in his 
junior year. In 1878 he returned to Westmoreland county and engaged in the 
newspaper business in Mount Pleasant. He associated himself with his broth- 
er-in-law, forming the firm of Kennedv & Shields, editors of the Mount Pleasant 
'Journal, then a weekly paper. This publication was orignally the Mount 
Pleasant Independent, and the first copy was issued Saturday, October ig, 
1872. The paper was then a four column, single sheet publication, and Mr. E. 
B. Halsinger was the editor and proprietor. However, the real founder of the 
paper was Mr. A. W. Fox, who owned the major part and assisted in the con- 
duct of the paper until 1874, when Mr. A. C. Haverstick purchased it. Mr. 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 12 = 



Haverstick was succeeded by a Mr. Cooper, who in turn sold his interest to 
■Mr. Job A. Stevenson and ^ir. Joseph A. ]\lcCurdy, who conducted it success- 
fullv until it came into the hands of ]\lr. Shields and his brother-in-law, Decem- 
ber I, 1882. This arrangement existed until 1885, when Air. Shields purchased 
the interest of his partner, thus becoming sole editor and owner of the Mount 
Pleasant Journal. In 1896 Mr. Shields enlarged the paper to eight pages. It 
is a well-edited publication, devoted mostly to local news, and in every respect 
is considered one of the best in the county. The plant is well equipped with 
the verv best and most modern machinery, and it is operated with a first-class 
gasoline engine. The circulation is two thousand two hundred copies. The 
Mount Pleasant Journal is independent in politics, although its proprietor is a 
strong Republican. Mr. Shields is a member of the B. P. O. E., and is a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church. In August, 1900, Mr. Shields married Hannah 
G. Ramsay, a daughter of ^Morris Ramsay, general superintendent of the coal 
and coke company. Two children, ^ilatthcw and James R. Shields were born 
to them. 

BRYCE BROTHERS COMPANY. In the fall of 1893 A. H. 
Bryce and J. "SlcD. Bryce formed a copartnership under the name of Bryce 
Brothers and operated a factory of one furnace at Hammondville, Fayette 
county, about three miles south of i\Iount Pleasant. The product consisted of 
light blown tumblers, stem and stable ware, decorated by the process known as 
needle etching. This class of work had previously been imported and this was 
the first concerted effort made to supplant foreign glass for fine table ware. In 
two years the demand had outgrown the product of the plant, and it was re- 
moved to Alount Pleasant in July, 1896, where a substantial brick building was 
erected as nearly fireproof as possible to make it when the company, known as 
Bryce Brothers Company, was incorporated with A. H. Bryce as president, J. 
McD. Bryce as secretary and treasurer. These with William McNanghton con- 
stitute the board of directors. The business has kept on growing until at present 
the plant consists of three furnaces, and the buildings cover four acres of 
ground and employ over six hundred people. The company produces all styles 
of light tumblers and stemware, suitable for the table and buffet, in jjlain as well 
as cut, engraved sand blast, needle etched and color decorations. They find a 
market all over the United States and have a reputation for quality of goods 
equal to the best French factories, and while succeeding in creating a trade in 
this country for the class of goods they manufacture have been able to curtail 
to some extent the importations. 

JOSEPH P. KELLER. It may safely be asserted that in all West- 
moreland county there can be found no more popular host than Joseph P. 
Keller, of Mount Pleasant. He is a son of Michael Keller, who was born in 
1813, in county Kerry, Ireland, and about the time of attaining his majority 
emigrated' to the United States. He settled at Tiffin, Ohio, where he owned 
and cultivated a farm of two hundred and eighty acres. While devoting most 
of his attention to his estate he was interested in various other enterprises, being 
a stockholder in the carriage factory, the woolen mills and the Standard Ma- 
chinery ^Manufacturing Company of Tiffin. In 1849 he crossed the plains to 
California in quest of the gold fields, where he accumulated a considerable sum 
of money. In 1854 he returned to Ohio. He married Margaret Kinney, who 
was born in 1823, in Tiffin, Ohio, where her parents settled on coming from 
Ireland, and the following children were horn to them : Frank., chief ncnnnitant 



126 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



of Dillinger & Sons' distillery, Scottdale ; Ella, wife of H. E. O'Liricn, of San 
Francisco, California ; Edward J., assistant cashier of the Merchants' National 
Bank, Indianapolis, Indiana ; Joseph P., mentioned hereafter : James, teller in ^ 
bank at Santiago, California ; Eugene, proprietor of the Hill House, Scottdale ; 
Lewis, a dentist in Tififin, Ohio; and Irvin, a physician in Baltimore. Maryland. 
l\Irs. Keller, the mother of these children, died in 1900, and her husljand sur- 
vived her but two years, passing away in 1902. Mr. Keller was a well-known 
citizen and took a deep interest in the welfare of the community. He was a 
devout member of the Roman Catholic church. 

Joseph P. Keller, son of Michael and Margaret (Kinney) Keller, was born 
March 18, 1866. in Tiffin, Ohio, where he received his primary education, after- 
ward entering Notre Dame University, South Bend, Indiana. In 1884 he went 
to Connellsville, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, where for about eighteen months 
he was employed as clerk by the Frick Coke Company. He then went to Mount 
Pleasant, where he was emplo}-ed bv the same company in the same capacity. 
In 1889 he migrated to Chicago and while there engaged in business on his own 
account as a dealer in housefurnishing goods. He took one of his brothers 
into partnership and together they conducted the business for five years. At 
the end of that time he sold out and went to Scottdale, where he again became a 
clerk for the Frick Coke Company, remaining with them until 1900, when he 
accepted the position of teller in the Frist National Bank of Scottdale. The ]30- 
sion he held until 1904, when he resigned and went to Mount Pleasant in order 
to become proprietor of the Cooper House. He caused the establishment to be 
remodeled throughout, and it is now one of the first-class hotels of the borough, 
its popularity being greatly increased by the genial manners and obliging dis- 
position of the proprietor. As a citizen Mr. Keller holds a high place in the 
regard of his neighbors, as is shown by the fact that in 1904 he was nominated 
for the legislature on the Democratic ticket. He belongs to Lodge No. 'yyj, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, of Scottdale ; also to Modern Wood- 
men of America and Scottdale Council. He and his family are members of 
St. Joseph's (Roman Catholic) church. 

Mr. Keller married. June 10, 1889, Emma K., daughter of Daniel and 
Sarah S. (Seese) Shupe, and a native of Mount Pleasant. The following chil- 
dren have been born to Mr. and IMrs. Keller : Leo Paul, Michael Eugene, 
Thomas Lynch, Edward Shupe, Joseph \\'hitmore, and Joseph Paul, deceased. 

DA^aD MILLER LYLE. Among his ministerial brethren of West- 
moreland county David Miller Lyle, of Mount Pleasant, holds a recognized 
place. He is the fifth in descent from Robert Lyle, who with his two brothers, 
John and Aaron, came from eastern Pennsylvania about the middle of the 
eighteenth century, and settled in Washington county, their father having come 
from Scotland some years previous. 

John Lyle was one of the pioneers of Belmont county, Ohio. He was a 
farmer and a strict Presbyterian. His wife was Isabel Miller, and they were 
the parents of several children, the youngest of whom was David, mentioned 
hereafter. The sons were all farmers and are all now deceased. 

David Lyle, son of John and Isabel (Miller) Lyle. was born in 1829, in 
Belmont county, Ohio, and like his father followed agricultural pursuits; He 
was active in public affairs, both political and otherwise. He was a zealous 
member of the Presbyterian church, in which for years he served as elder. He 
married, in March, 1836, Mary, born in Harrison county. Ohio, daughter of 
George and Nancy (McCracken) Love, of Scotch-Irish descent, and seven 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAXD COUXTV. 127 

children were born to them : George, a farmer ; John, engaged in mercantile 
business at McKeesport, Pennsylvania : James, a farmer ; Annabelle. wife of 
Brainerd C. Lyle. of \\'ashington county. Pennsylvania : Sadie, who resides at 
home : Ella, wife of the Rev. William E. Guthrie, a United Presbyterian minis- 
ter of Mexico. Pennsylvania: and David Miller, mentioned hereafter. Mr. 
Lvle, the father of the family, died in 1898. at the age of sixty-nine. He was a 
man of the highest integrity. His widow is still living at the old home in Ohio. 
David Miller Lyle. son of David and Mary (Love) Lyle, was born August 
26, 1872, in Belmont county, Ohio, near L'niontown, and was reared on the 
farm, receiving his nriman.- education in the district school. He afterward 
entered Franklin College. Xew Athens. Ohio, from which institution he re- 
ceived in 1895 the degree of Bachelor of Arts. In the autumn of the same year 
he matriculated at the \\'estern Theological L'niversity, Allegheny. Pennsyl- 
vania, graduating thence in the spring of 1898. He then went to Leisenring, 
Pennsylvania, where he filled the pulpit for two years. In Jtuie, 1900, he went 
to Blount Pleasant in response to a call to the pastorate of the Reunion Presby- 
terian church of that place. Lender his ministrations the membership of the 
church has increased, and various improvements have been made in the edifice, 
including the placing of a fine new pipe organ. He has endeared himself to 
his parishioners, to whose best interests he is thoroughly devoted, and is active 
in the discharge of his duties as a citizen. Mr. Lyle married, July 21, 1900, 
Florence, daughter of James G. Bailey, of Xew Glasgow, Xova Scotia, and they 
have one child, Donald Fraser. 

JOHN DICKEY McCALEB. Among the old residents and worthy 
representatives of Westmoreland county and the men who have contributed 
largely to the upbuilding of that place, is John Dickey McCaleb. a prominent 
business man, and for many years justice of the peace and notary public of 
Mount Pleasant. He was bom near Congruity church, in Salem township, 
AVestmoreland county, Pennsylvania, August 4, 1824, a son of John and Sally 
(Hosack) McCaleb, and grandson of James McCaleb, who was a farmer at 
Har\'eys Cross Roads in Salem township, where he lived for many years. He 
-was a man of means and an extensive property holder. He married, and the 
•following named children were born to him : Margaret, Elizabeth. Archibald, 
John, James and Martha. 

John, fourth child and older son of Jeams McCaleb, and father of John 
Dickey McCaleb, was born and reared in Westmoreland county. His boyhood 
was spent on the home farm, and in earlv life he commenced teaching school. 
which occupation he followed all his life, devoting some fifty years to it. He 
first taught in the subscription schools, and later in the public schools. He was 
a member and regular attendant of the Presbyterian church, and married Sally 
Hosack, a zealous and active church worker. The following named children 
were born to Mr. and Airs. McCaleb: i. Jane, deceased, who was the wife of 
'John Russell, also deceased : 2. Alargaret. deceased : 3. Mary Ann, deceased ; 
4. Sarah, deceased: 5. Jam.es Russell, died at \'icksburs: during the Civil war, 
having enlisted in Ohio; 6. Hannah E., married John Hctherington, of West- 
moreland county, both deceased; 7. John D.. mentioned hereafter: 8. Helen S., 
unmarried. 

John Dickey McCaleb, at the age of ten years, left home and went to live 
with Major Kain, near Hannastown, where he remained for three years, then 
removing to Mount Pleasant, where he found employment in the firm of Cun- 
-ningham & Anderson. .After remaining there for a short time he associated 



128 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

himself with Peter BIystone, conducting his store for six months. At the ex- 
piration of this time lie returned to Mount Pleasant and accepted a position in 
the store of Shervvick & Braden, remaining there for some seven or eight years, 
when he severed his connection with this firm and estahlishcd himself in the 
wholesale dry goods business in Philadelphia. /\ftcr six months he returned to 
Mount Pleasant and opened a general store which he conducted for some time 
with considerable success. He subsequently formed a partnership with one of 
his former employers, John Shcrwick. This arrangement existed for several 
years, and Mr. McCalcl) tlirn sold cmt his interest in the business, and became 
interested in the oil business at I'ithole. During these years of earnest work 
Mr. McCaleb had accumulated a fair c()m])etency. all of which he lost soon 
after entering the oil luisiness. However, being undaunted by his misfortune 
and a man of moral and physical courage, he immediately set himself to work 
to re-establish the fortune he had lost. He engaged in the foundry business at 
Mount Pleasant, where he erected a fine plant, besides buying out three other 
concerns in the borough. Owing to his inexperience in this line, Mr. McCaleb 
again met with financial losses, and after four or five years relinquished this 
business. He then opened a small store in Mount Pleasant, and met with con- 
siderable success. In 18S5 he was a])pointed postmaster of the borough, 
serving two terms. After his retirement from the postoffice he received the 
appointment of notary public, which office he still holds. 

In politics he accords with the doctrines of the Republican party, and loses 
no o]iportunity of advancing the interests of that organization. He is a man of 
standing in the community, and the esteem in which he is held by his fellow- 
townsmen is demonstrated by the fact that he was elected a member of the 
board council, member of the school board, and other minor ofiices, the duties 
of which he acquitted with credit and efficiency. In connetion with his duties 
as notary public, Mr. McCaleb acts as representative of several of the steamship 
companies. He has contributed his share toward the building up of the town, 
having erected two fine brick residences besides a number of smaller houses. 
Mr. McCaleb was the first man to promote the organization of the First National 
Bank of Alount Pleasant ( 1863), which was the first organized National liank 
in Westmoreland county. 

In 185 1 Mr. iMcCaleb was united in marriage to Sarah B. Sherwick, 
daughter of Joseph Sherwick. She was born in Westmoreland county, in 1827. 
The following named children were born to Mr. and Mrs. McCaleb : i. Ella, sec- 
retary of Vassar College, at which institution she was educated and where she 
received the degree of A. B. 2. J. Sherrick McCaleb, who was educated in 
Mount Pleasant. He was engaged for eleven years as cashier of the Connells- 
ville (Pennsylvania) National Bank, and had the remarkable record of making 
but one error during that time. He now resides at Edgewood, where he is 
state auditor and accountant. He married Katherine Johnson, and after her 
death married Katherine Roberts. 3. William Baird, superintendent of the 
eastern division of the Pennsylvania railroad office at Harrisburg. He married 
Mary Reed, of Sunbury, Pennsylvania, and they have two children. 4. George 
H., deceased in 1855. 5. Effie, at home. 

CURTIS HUSSEY GREGG, an attorney of Greensburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, of the firm of Gregg & Potts, whose ancestry and personal career has 
made him a man of more than ordinary prominence, was born at Adamsburg, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, August 9, 1865. The founder of this 
family of Greggs in the United States was James Gregg, one of four brothers 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 129 

who came to this country from the north of Ireland and settletl in the Cimiher- 
land valley, Pennsylvania. One of the brothers settled in New York ; one in 
(Jhio and the other in central Pennsylvania. From the latter sprang the Gregg 
family from which descended ex-Governor Andrew Gregg Curtin. 

The grandfather of Curtis Hussey Gregg was James Gregg, who was a 
native of the United States. He married into the Marshall family, his wife be- 
ing a native of Cumberland valley. 

The father was James Gregg, born in Carlisle, Cumberland county, Penn- 
sylvania, June 24, 1821. He was engaged in the mercantile business in Adams- 
burg, \\'estmorcland county, Pennsylvania, until 1876, when he became treas- 
urer of the county. His schooling was confined to a term in Duff's Business 
College at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. In religion he espoused the Lutheran faith. 
He was "an old-fashioned, Simon-pure Democrat." He served as treasurer of 
\\'estmoreland countv from 1876 to 1879, and as justice of the peace in Greens- 
burg borough from 1881 to 1886; also school director in Greensburg. He died 
January 5, 1889. His wife was Eliza Cort Gregg, born January 5, 1826, still 
living. She is the daughter of George Byerly, who was a grandson of Andrew 
Byerly, of Bushy Run battle fame, in the early-day Indian wars in Westmore- 
land county, an account of which is given in the general chapter of this work. 

Curtis H. Gregg, son of James and Eliza Cort Gregg, received his educa- 
tion in the common schools and the Greensburg Seminary, where he pursued a 
two years' course. He began his business career in an humble manner, serving 
in the role of a newsboy in Greensburg, but through his aim to accomplish more 
in life he was soon holding the position of news editor for the Greensburg 
Press, and continued from 1883 to 1887. Later he taught school one term, 
and then applied himself to the study of law, being admitted to the bar August 
4. 188S. He studied with Hon. Lucian \V. Doty (later president judge of 
Westmoreland county), and A. M. Sloan, Esq. He almost instantly forged 
into the front ranks of a bar numbering a hundred members, which body stands 
among the most talented in the commonwealth. His knowledge and keen fore- 
sight into the interpretation of legal problems, together with his forceful argu- 
ments, compelled an early recognition and made him a successful practitioner. 
Death causing a vacancy in the office of the district attorney in July, 1891, he 
was appointed to that office and nominated by the Democratic party the same 
year for that office, but the fates of political power were against him. He has 
always been an ardent party worker, and being possessed of rare gifts as a pub- 
lic speaker has been frequently drafted into hotly contested political campaigns. 
For four years he served acceptably on the Greensburg school board, and has 
been a member of the town council, of which he was ]5resident one year. He 
was among the progenitors of the Greensburg, Jeannette & Pittsburg Electric 
Railway, and has been initiated in all that has tended to give new life and 
growth to his home town. In 1896 he was chairman of the Democratic county 
committee, and a hearty supporter of Colonel W. J. Bryan. It was in igoo' 
that he was the unsuccessful candidate for congress from the Twentv-fourth 
district in Pennsylvania, and was the nominee of his party for state senator in 
the Thirty-ninth district in 1904. During the time the Sj)anish-Amcrican war 
soldiers were enlisting and going to the seat of war from Westmoreland county. 
^Ir. Gregg was caliefl upon to deliver more tiian thirty flag-raising speeches in' 
various parts of the county. They burned with true patriotism. He is a mem- 
ber of various civic societies, including the I. O. H., B. E., K. of M., and G. F^. 
Mr. Gregg is a member of Zion Lutheran church of Greensburg, and has been 
the chorister there for more than tv.-enty years. Mr. Gregg married, June 2:1, 



I30 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

1890, Frances A. Good, in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, daughter of George W. 
Good, who died January 6, 1905. He was the builder and owner of many of 
the largest business blocks in Greensburg and adjoining towns. He was presi- 
dent of the St. Clair Opera House Company, and director in the John W. Pollins 
Company, a department store. His wife was Maria C. (Lenhart) Good, who 
still survives. Air. and Mrs. Gregg have two sons: James, born May 21, 1891 ; 
George Good, born December 29, 1895 ; both born in Greensburg, Pennsylvania. 

DAVID L. NEW'ILL, of the law firm of Beacom and Newill, at 
Greensburg, Pennsylvania, was born August 15, 1862, in Mount Pleasant town- 
ship, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. The founder of the Newill family 
in this country was Stephen Newill, of Irish descent, who came to Mount Pleas- 
ant township, Westmoreland county, about 1773, from New Jersey. He was 
■ by occupation a farmer. He was of the Presbyterian religious faith. He mar- 
ried and had children: James, Joshua, John, Robert, Thomas and Richard, 
all of whom were soldiers in the War for Independence. The only daughter in 
the family of Stephen Newill and wife was Mary, who married Barney McCaul, 
who also served in the same Vi-ar. 

Robert Newill, one of the above named sons of Stephen, was a farmer, and 
married Mary George. He was a member of the Presbyterian church, as had 
been his father. Robert Newill and wife Mary had children: John; George, a 
civil engineer; James, who was the grandfather of David L. Newill; Sinai 
Craig and Ann iliompson. James Newill had sons: James, George, John, 
William, Robert and Joshua (the father of David L.) and one daughter, Mary 
Long. 

Joshua Newill, the fifth in descent from Stephen the founder, was born 
August 4, 1821. By general occupation he was a farmer, but in his young 
manhood taught school. He was a Republican in politics, and among other 
local offices which he held was that of school director. He died January 14, 
1898. His wife's given name was Scynthia, born August 27, 1828; died Jan- 
uary 19, 1905. 

David L. Newill, son of Joshua and Scynthia Newill, graduated at Mount 
Pleasant Institute in 1884. He taught school two terms. He read law with 
W. H. Klingesmith, of Greensburg, Pennsylvania, and was admitted to the bar 
of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, August 4, 1888, and has been in con- 
stant practice ever since. He formed a partnership with Hon. James S. Bea- 
com in 1892, which still continues. Aside from his professional career, Mr. 
Newill is interested in various financial enterprises. He is the president of the 
Westmoreland Savings and Trust Company, of Greensburg, Pennsylvania ; 
president of the First National Bank of Youngwood, Pennsylvania ; president 
of the Greensburg Finance Company : treasurer of the Greensburg Composition 
Companv, and director of the Greensburg Press Company. His political affili- 
ations are with the Republican party. He is a member of Philanthropy Lodge, 
No. 225, F. and A. M., of Greensburg, Pennsylvania. He married, November 
8, 1888, Minnie G. Myers, daughter of Joseph B. and Julia Myers. Mr. and 
Mrs. Newill are the parents of one daughter, Mabel M., born August 27, 1889. 

HON. JAMES S. BEACOM, ex-state treasurer and a prominent at- 
torney of Greensburg, was born December 9, 1853, in W^estmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, son of Henry Conlcy and his wife, Mary A. (Spear) Beacom. 
Of his ancestors it is found that John Beacom came from Ireland to the United 
States, settling in Westmoreland county, where he was paying taxes in 1810. 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 131 

He was the great-grandfather of James S. Beacom. Among his children were 
John, Jeremiah, Johnston and James, the last named being the subject's grand- 
father, who died early in life, leaving; two sons, Henry Conley and James. 

Henrv Conley Beacom, father of James S. Beacom, was born in Alay, 1830, 
and died November 18, 1904, leaving a widow, JMary A., and five children: 
lames S. Beacom ; Angeline, married Thomas F. Hamilton, superintendent of 
the Gautier Steel works, of Johnston, Pa. : Henry Conley Beacom, a farmer in 
Iowa ; John Wesley Beacom, of Long Branch, Cal. ; and Eva, wife of Edgar 
Hays, cashier of the Union Savings Bank, of Pittsburg, Pa. The father of this 
family became a member of the Pittsburg conference of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church in 1865, and was a minister until his death. Prior to his ministry 
he taught school. His wife, ]\Iary A. ( Spear) Beacom, is living in Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania. 

James S. Beacom obtained in the public schools his primary education, 
later attending Elderton Academy, and Washington and Jeiterson College, 
from which he graduated in the class of 1880. He was admitted to the bar in 
\\"estmoreland county, in 1884, and has since that date practiced most of the 
time. Politicallv r^Ir. Beacom is a staunch Republican, and has been a faithful 
partv worker, engaging in several hotly contested campaigns. He was a loyal 
supporter of Hon. Matthew S. Quay, United States senator. He was a mem- 
ber of the house of representatives of the legislature of Pennsylvania in the 
sessions of 1887 and 1901. From May, 1898 to Alay, 1900, he was state treas- 
urer, in which position he effected some radical changes in the management of 
that important office, leaving its finances in better shape than for many prev- 
ious }ears. In the famous Silver campaign of 1896, in which William McKin- 
lev was nominated for president at the Republican national convention at St. 
Louis, he was one of the delegates at large. In his religious connection he is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and for many years has liecn a 
member of the board of trustees. Mr. Beacom was married, July 17, 1888, to 
Mary H. Zimmers, of Blairsville, Pennsylvania, who was a graduate of the 
Blairsville Female Seminary. She is the daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Zim- 
mers. Her father was for many years station agent for the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Company at Blairsville, Pennsylvania. Mr. and ]\Irs. Beacom have chil- 
dren : Robert Zimmers Beacom. Dorothy, Elizabeth and \'irginia. 

HOX. WELTY McCULLOGH was born in Greensburg. Pennsyl- 
vania, October 10, 1847, and was graduated from Princeton College in the 
class of 1870. He read law with the late W. H. H. Markle, Esq.. in Greensburg, 
and was admitted to the bar in 1872. Very early in his professional life he be- 
came a corporation lawyer and devoted most of his time to railroad law. For 
many years he was solicitor for the Baltimore and Ohio railroad and other 
important corporations. Whilst he always resided in Greensburg and practiced 
in our courts, he almost continuously kept an office in Pittsburg and practiced 
in the .Allegheny county courts as well. He was renowned both there and in 
Westmoreland county as a lawyer of high standing particularly in corporation 
law. In the preparation of ])apers and in all the varied work of an all around 
lawyer, he had but few equals in either of these counties. He was married on 
June 13, 1872. to Ada P.. Markle. of Greensburg, a daughter of W. H. H. 
Markle. Esq., with whom he had read law. 

He was scrupulously careful to perform his share of the work or bear his 
share of the burdens that fell upon him and his friends. He always took an ac- 
tive part in politics, and made many public addresses of that character. In 



132 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

doing so he did not select the places easily accessible to his home, but will- 
ingly did his share of the work in remote regions of the county. Nor did he 
reaU'v ever seek office, though in 1886 he was nominated for congress by the 
Republicans of Westmoreland, h^ayette, and Greene counties. The district was 
strongly Democratic but there were two Democrats in the field which divided 
the vote of that party and Mr. McCullough was elected. Unfortunately after 
the close of his term in congress he was taken sick and died August i, 1889. 
The bar associations of both Allegheny and Westmoreland counties passed 
highly eulogistic resolutions of his work and merit as a lawyer and a citizen. 
j\Ir. McCullogh was a man of strong physi(|ue, a handsome face and as has been 
shown above had talents of a high order. One of his leading characteristics 
was his thorough honesty, not only in business matters but in the expression of 
opinion and in everytnmg he did. He could not feign a friendship he did not 
feel. Had he been less sincere he might perhaps have been more popular. His 
circle of friends was not as wide as that of many, but all wlio knew him per- 
sonally were most devoted to him and remained so through life. 

DENNA C. OGDEN, an attorney of the city of Greensburg, Penn- 
sylvania, was born in Westmoreland county. Pennsylvania, March 16, i860, the 
second son of Lieutenant John B. Ogden and wife Bella J. (McDowell) Ogden. 
He is the fifth in line of descent from Joseph Ogden, who was a brother of the 
eminent jurist, David Ogden, born 1707: a graduate of Yale College, 1728, ad- 
mitted to the bar, and in 1772 appointed judge of the supreme court of New 
Jersey. He died in 1800. 

Joseph Ogden, grandfather of Denna C. Ogden, was born in New Jersey, 
in 1710, and died in the same state in 1772. He had a son Joseph, born in 1735 ; 
came to Fairfield township, Westmoreland county in 1755 and there died in 
18 1 5. He was among the pioneer band who settled the county. Among his 
children was one son named James Ogden, born in 1785, died in 1858. He had 
a son, John B. Ogden, born July 16, 1825, and died December 19, 1889. He 
was lieutenant of Company D, Fourth Pennsylvania Regiment Cavalry, during 
the Civil war. He aided in raising the regiment and was commissioned first 
lieutenant. He served under Colonel George H. Covode. He was twice 
wounded and disabled while in the Army of the Potomac. He married, in 1854, 
Bella J. McDowell, by whom three children were born: Bella J. (McDowell) 
Ogden was the daughter of Jacob McDowell, the youngest of a family of six- 
teen children, and whose father, Robert McDowell, was of Scotch-Irish descent, 
and located on eighteen hundred acres of land in I^igonier township, Westmore- 
land county. He was married in Fort Ligonicr. which he and his wife helped 
defend against the Indian attacks in 1763. 

Denna C. Ogden was educated in the common schools and at Blairsville 
Academy. He read law with Stewart and Marlin, of Jefferson county, Penn- 
sylvania, where he was admitted to the bar in 1882 and the following year ad- 
mitted to practice in Westmoreland county, locating at Greensburg. He was 
nominated on the Democratic ticket for the office of district attorney in 1886, 
conducted a remarkable campaign and was elected by a large majority, polling 
more votes than any of the sixteen Democratic candidates, and was the \'oung- 
est man ever elected to that time, to such a position in the county, he being only 
twenty-six years of age. Throughout his term of three years he acquitted him- 
self manfully and treated all with fairness. He refused to become a candidate 
again. Since that date he has built up a lucrative practice and enjoys a good 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 133 



reputation for being an honorable legal adviser. He married, April 5, li 
Anna W. McCullough, daughter of John AlcCullough, and wife, and the sister 
of Hon. \\'elty McCullough, deceased. 

ANANIAS SHUMAKER. the present treasurer of Westmoreland 
county, is of German descent, the family name originally being spelled "Schu- 
jnaker." At an earlv day the ancestors settled in eastern Pennnsylvania, some 
of its members living in Bucks county. The family have nearly all been farm- 
ers, and the grandfa'ther of Ananias Shumaker was one of the sturdy farmers 
of his time. He was born in Allegheny township, Somerset county. Pennsyl- 
vania. He married, lived and died in the same county. Their children were : 
John. Daniel, Jacob. Peter, Sarah and ]\Iary. They all married and became 
farmers in their native county. 

Jacob Shumaker, the third child of the family, and the father of Ananias 
Shumaker, was born in Somerset county, near \\'ellesburg. about 181 1. He 
■married a widow, ]\Irs. Polly Earnest, whose maiden name was Hoover. Her 
parents were Michael and Eve (Frits) Hoover, of Somerset county, Pennsyl- 
vania. They were farmers their entire lives. By Mr. Earnest she had one son 
and one daughter, the former died in 1902. By Mr. Shumaker she had chil- 
dren : I. Mary: 2. John, died at the age of eight years; 3. Ananias, bom May 
22. 1842: 4. Elizabeth: 5. Catherine. All married and are residents of West- 
moreland county. 

Ananias Shumaker received his education in the public schools of Somer- 
set county, Pennsylvania, and followed farm life chiefly until eighteen years 
of age when he enlisted at Berlin, Pennsylvania, as a member of Company F. 
imder Captain Albert Heffley, as a private. His regiment was the One Hun- 
dred and Forty-second Pennsylvania Infantry, commanded by Colonel Com- , 
mons, who was' killed at the battle of Gettysburg. This regiment was a part of 
the Fifth Armv Corps and of the Army of the Potomac. ;\lr. Shumaker was at 
the battle of Fredericksburg, and with his regiment during every engagement 
in which thev participated, to the close of that greatest of American conflicts., 
being honorably discharged at Washington, D. C, 'May 29. 1865. During all 
these vears of warfare he was fortunate enough to have never been captured, 
wounded, or in hospital, though several shots at various times pierced his cloth- 
ing. But four or five of his comrades fared as well, for in many a hard fought 
battle the loss was great to his command. When peace finally came, and the 
"stars and stripes" were the only colors flying over a free people, Mr. Shu- 
maker returned to his native county, and on January 29. 1866, he was married 
to Mary Ann Campbell, daughter of W. B. and Sarah (Harr) Campbell, farm- 
ers of Cook township, \\'estmoreland county. Pennsvlvania. Soon after his 
marriage, he removed to Knox county. Ohio, where he embarked in the boot 
and shoe trade. After two and one-half vears in business in Ohio, he sold and 
went west, locating at Tama city, Iowa, then a mere hamlet, but now a prosper- 
ous railroad centre. After a short time he returned to his native coutity, locat- 
ing in the boot and shoe business at Latrobe. but after a few years he sold and 
became a traveling salesman for a large boot and shoe wholesale house — Graff, 
Sons and Company, of Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, for whom he traveled in 
western Pennsylvania for twenty-one vears. leaving the road in 1895. being 
suceeded by his second son. Charles W. ShumnVfr. who travelcrl for the firm 
until they went out of business, his term of road life extending over a oeriod of 
eight years. He was one of three partners in a shoe factory at Latrobe. Penn- 
sylvania, continuing from 1885 to 1890. Politics engaged his attention for 



134 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

some time, and in 1902 he received the nomination for county treasurer of West- 
moreland county, there being three in the field ; he showed his popularity by re- 
ceiving more votes than both opposing candidates. He was elected by more 
than four thousand majority. Politically, Mr. Shumaker has ever been an 
active, working Republican. He was a member of the council of Latrobe two 
terms, in the place in which he had spent thirty-two years of his life. He re- 
moved to the city of Greensburg (that being the county seat) upon his election, 
taking his seat January i, 1903, and in October of that year, purchased the dry 
goods business formerly conducted by W. T. Welty, at No. 128 Main street, 
Greensburg. He built, in 1905, an up-to-date residence on North Maple ave- 
nue, the cost of which, including the lot, was twelve thousand dollars, provid- 
ing himself and family one of the best homes in the city. 

Mr. Shumaker married (first), in 1866, Mary Ann Campl)ell. Their chil- 
dren were: William Milton, born in Knox county, Ohio, October 22, 1867, now 
deputy treasurer under his father; Blanche, born August 16, 1870, at Latrobe, 
died November 3, 1874 ; Ella, born at the same place, April 3, 1873, now at home 
and acting as her father's clerk and typewriter; Charles Wesley, born at Lat- 
robe, January 21, 1876, now manager of his father's dry goods store in Greens- 
burg, Pa.; Ada j\L, born at the same place, March 16, 1879, died April 14, 
1886, at the age of eight years. William Milton, Ella and Charles Wesley at- 
tended school as follows: William Milton went from the Latrobe high school to 
the State Normal at Indiana, Pennsylvania, 1884 ; Dickinson Seminary, Will- 
iarnsport, Pennsylvania, 1883. The next two years he taught in the high school 
at Latrobe ; was bookkeeper in his father's store for a year or more, when he 
accepted a position in the First National Bank at Latrobe, which he held for 
twelve years. From there he entered his father's office as deputy county treas- 
urer; Ella attended the Pittsburg Female Collge in 1889; then attended Neff 
College, of Philadelphia one year, and now assists in her father's office, he being 
treasurer of Westmoreland county. Charles Wesley attended Grove City Bus- 
iness College, of Mercer, Pennsylvania, graduating in 1892. He then clerked 
in his father's store, vmtil he took his place as commercial traveler which place 
he faithfully filled eight years, until the firm ceased to exist. These children 
are all at home and unmarried. Mr. Shumaker's first wife died April 14, 1894, 
at Latrobe, Pennsylvania. He married (second) Margaret H. Henderson, a 
native of Bedford, Pennsylvania, the daughter of Hugh John and Jane ( Reed ) 
Henderson. Her grandfather, John Henderson, came from Ireland. Jane (Reed) 
Henderson, jMrs. Shumaker's mother, was the daughter of Thomas and Eu- 
pemia (Moorhead) Reed. Her great-grandfather and great-grandmother were 
Thomas and Phebe jMoorhead. By Mr. Shumaker's last marriage the follow- 
ing children were born: Henderson, born Julv 23, 1897; Margaret, born March 
23, 1899, died January 16, 1900; Isabella Jane, born IMarch 26, 1901 ; Theodore, 
born March 11, 1903, died in infancy. 

Mr. Shumaker has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal church for 
thirty-five years, twenty years of which time he has served as president of the 
board of trustees at Latrobe He was on the building committee when the 
cfiurch was erected there in 1881, and generously donated towards its building 
expense. He is a member of a quarter of a centurv standing in both the R. A. 
and A. O. of U. W. lodges, at Latrobe and belong:s to the G."a. R., W. P. Will- 
iams Post No. J., in which order he has passed all the chairs and was a delegate 
to the state encampment in 1886. No citizen of the county stands higher in the 
estimation of the people than Mr. Shumaker. He has ever been loyal to his 
country, his native state and county ; been prompt in all his dealings, with his 



HISTORY OF IVESTMORELAXD COUXTV. 135 

fellow men bv the true christian spirit ; is a thoroughgoing business man and an 
exemplarv father and husband. Notwithstanding he was for twenty-one years 
a "knight of the road." mingling with all classes of men. subject to tempta- 
tions on every hand and saw the rough side of army life in time of the rebellion, 
yet alwavs niaintained a manly character and continues to enjoy the respect of 
all about' him. He is now enabled to be surrounded with the blessings of a well 
reared family and enjoy the fruits of his labors. 

THE BRUXOT FA^HLY is one of the old families of France, which 
first came into national prominence during the period of the religious wars hi 
that countrs^ in the sixteenth century. Major Sanson Brunot (great-great- 
grandfather) was a distinguished officer in the French army and has a coat of 
arms (still in possession of the Brunot family), which was bestowed on him for 
meritorious conduct on the field of battle. His son. Dr. Felix Brunot (great- 
grandfather), was born in Parish Morey, France, January 9, 1752, and was a 
foster brother of General LaFayette. He was originally intended for "orders" 
bv his uncle, a Catholic bishop, but experiencing an aversion for that calling 
he was permitted to enter upon the study of medicine. After graduation from 
one of the first medical schools of France he joined General LaFayette in his 
espousal of' the patriotic cause in America. He came to this country in 1777, 
was appointed surgeon in the Continental army under Washington, and ren- 
dered invaluable service at the battle of Brandywine and on many other battle 
fields during the revolutionary- war. At the close of that great struggle he was 
recognized as one of the most successful physicians and skillful surgeons in the 
new-risen Republic, in whose cause he had patriotically risked his life, and with 
whose destinv had unhesitatingly cast in his fortunes, Xo warmer hearted and 
more earnest friend of freedom than Dr, Brunot ever came to this continent, 
and no man's sen-ice was ever rendered in the cause of American indpendence 
more devotedly than his. .After the declaration of peace between Great Britain 
and the "Thirteen Colonies," Dr. Brunot located at Annapolis, Maryland, but 
soon removed to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he enjoyed a large prac- 
tice and remained until 1797. In that year he came to Pittsburg and selected 
his place of residence on a beautiful island (now known as "Brunot's Island") 
in the Ohio river, a short distance below that city. At his island home he 
entertained his foster brother and comrades in arms. General LaFayette, and 
George Rogers Clarke and Herman Blennerhasset and many other prominent 
characters of American history. He subsequently removed to Liberty street, 
Pittsburg, where he died ]\Iay 23, 1838. He was a public-spirited citizen, and 
after coming to Pittsburg always took a great interest in the growth and pros- 
perity of that city. Dr. I3runot was twice married. His first wife was a lady 
of .Annapolis, by whom he had one daughter, who married but died without 
issue. His second wife, Elizabeth Kreider, of Philadelphia, whom he married 
December 17, 1789, bore him six sons and one daughter. Of these sons, Breton 
and Casper were physicians ; Sanson was a prominent minister in the Episcopal 
church and at one time w?s in charge of the church at Greensburg: Hilary 
served as a lieutenant in the L'nited States army, and the other two. Feli.x and 
James M.. became lawyers and settled in the southern states. James M. Bru- 
not was the father of Hilary B. Brunot, now practicing law in Brevard, North 
Carolina. Susan Louisa was the only daughter. 

Lieutenant Hilary Brunot (grandfather) was the fourth son and was born 
July 14, 1795, in a house that is still standing in Phila(lel])hia, on the bank of 
the Schuylkill river. When quite young he entered the L'nited States Military 



136 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

Academy at West Point, and was a member of one of the early classes which 
was graduated from that institution. After graduation he was commissioned 
as lieutenant in the United States regular army, and was wounded in the sortie 
at Fort Erie during the war of 1812, and was promoted to first lieutenant for 
gallantry in this battle. After the close of that struggle he was stationed re- 
spectively at Fort Snelling, Mackinaw, Green Bay and Newport. From the lat- 
ter place, Kentucky, he was stationed at the Allegheny arsenal in Pittsburg. In 
1825 resigned his command in the army and was engaged in the manufacture 
of white lead for many years. His works occupied the entire square upon which 
the Union depot in Pittsburg now stands. Lieutenant Brunot retired from ac- 
tive business in 1850, and died March 26, 1872. He was an earnest Christian, 
a man of great force of character, and was very active in politics. He was a 
Whig and later a Republican, and served for many years as a member of the 
city councils of Pittsburg. He married. May 6, 1819. Ann Tankard Reville, 
a daughter of Randell and Margaret Reville, of Newport, Kentucky. The 
Revilles were earlv settlers of Somerset county, Afaryland. To Lieutenant 
and Mrs. Brunot were born nine children, of whom none are living. Felix R. 
Brunot, of Pittsburg, one of the children, was one of the most noted philan- 
thropists of his day. 

Hilary J. Brunot (father) was educated in Sewickley Academy and West- 
ern University of Pittsburg. Leaving school he was engaged for a short time 
in the white lead business. In 1845 '^^ engaged in civil engineering and assisted 
Nathan McDowell to make test surveys for slackwater navigation on the j\Io- 
nongahela river. In 1849 he went with a Pittsburg comjjany to California, 
where he remained two years. In 1851 he returned to Pennsylvania and helped 
locate and survey the Allegheny Valley Railroad. In 1854 he resigned from 
the engineer corps and went to Indiana, where he married and then purchased 
a stock farm in Rock Island county, Illinois, upon which he resided for five 
years. In 1859 he removed to Fayette county, Pennsylvania, where he was en- 
gaged in farming and speculation in coal lands until 1873, when he came to 
Greensburg. Since then he has been dealing in coal, oil and gas lands. He 
was one of the pioneers of the natural gas business, and with the Haymaker 
brothers put down the first well at Murrysville. In 1883 he started the Daily 
and IVccklv Press, one of the leading papers of the country, which now has 
far more than a local circulation. During the late war Mr. Brunot was mus- 
tered into the service of the ITnited States at Camp Howell, July 2, 1863, and 
served until August ifi, 1863, when the regiment, the fifty-fourth, Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, was disbanded and he was discharged. Hilarv J. Brunot married, 
at Boone Grove, Indiana, July 12, 1855, Mary Bissell. Their children were: 
Ann Elizabeth, wife of Hilary B. Brunot, Brevard, North Carolina ; Marv Car- 
oline, widow of Dr. I. P. Klingensmith, of Blairsville, Pennsylvania ; Hilary 
Sanson, United States consul at St. Etienna. France ; Sarah Louisa : William 
P.., died at the age of nineteen years; Felix R., a broken of Greensburg. Penn- 
sylvania : }ilelusina B., wife of Joseph K. Barclay, of Greensburg, Pennsylvrnia ; 
James Thompson, died in 1902, and was survived by his wife. Rose Latta Bru- 
not, and an infant son, James T. Brunot : Indiana Traner, died in infancy ; John 
Breton, of whom later. Hilary J. Brunot died June g, 1900. 

John Breton Brunot, son of Hilary J. and Mary (Bissell) Brunot, was 
born at Greensburg, Pennsylvania, November 6, 1878, and received his educa- 
tion at the high school. Grove City College and University of Michigan. At 
the last named institution he took a three year law course, graduating June 19. 
igo2. He was admitted to the practice of his chosen profession in Westmore- 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAXD COUXTV. 137 

land coiintv, Mav. 1904. Shortly thereafter he became associated with J. R. 
Spieg-el. under the firm name of Spiegel & P.runot. whose office is in the i'ress 
buikiing at Greensburg. Pennsylvania. Politically Mr. Brunot is a supporter 
of the Republican party, and in church affiliations is an Episcopalian. He mar- 
ried, August 26, 1903. Alice E. Turner, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, daughter of 
John B. and Mary B. Turner. The father was an early settler and prominent 
ijusiness man of Cedar Rapids. ;\Ir. and Mrs. Brunot have one son. John B. 
Brunot. Jr.. born in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, November 9, 1904. 

JOHX J. HOl'SER, a leading business man of Ruffsdale, whose 
honorable and straightforward methods have brought to him a large degree of 
prosperitx' and success, is a native of New Stanton, Pennsylvania, born Decem- 
ber 13. 1866. 

John G. Houser, father of John J. Houser, was born in Germany. When 
sixteen years old he left his native land for a home in the new world, locating 
at what is now known as New Stanton, Pennsylvania, where for a few }-ears 
he was engaged in boiling salt. Later he turned his attention to farming in 
South Huntingdon township, which he continued until 1904. since which time 
he has lived in the village of Rutifsdale. He has held the office of school direc- 
tor for five or six terms, rendering efficient service in that capacity. He is a 
member and deacon in the Lutheran church, a Democrat in politics, and a mem- 
ber of the Patrons of Husbandry, and a director in the Mendon Grange Fire In- 
surance Company for several years. He married Rebecca Bare, daughter of 
Joseph Bare, and eight children were the issue, one of whom died in infancy. 
The surviving members are: John J., of whom later: Ida, wife of J. C. Hus- 
band, of Greensburg: Mary, unmarried: Martha, wife of Alfred N. Miller: 
Sarah, wife of Frank Leighty : William P., a clerk in the employ of his brother, 
John J., and Lula, unmarried. 

The common schools of South Huntingdon township and the Greensburg 
Seminary, which he attended one term, afforded John J, Houser the oppor- 
tunity of acquiring a practical education during his boyhood days. His first 
■occupation was that of teacher, in which capacity he served for seven years in 
the schools of East and South Huntingdon townships. He engaged as clerk 
with J. H. Ruff, at Ruffsrlale, in 1892, and at the expiration of one year he 
])urchased the business which consists of a general line of merchandise, and has 
successfully conducted the same up to the' present time (1905). He takes a 
keen interest in everything pertaining to the welfare of the community in which 
he resides, especiallv along educational lines, and for one term held the office 
of school director. He was a delegate to the state convention of school directors 
whicli convened at Harrisburg. in 1903. He was instrumental in the organi- 
zation of the Lutheran church of Ruffsdale, in which he serves as deacon and 
to the support of which he is a liberal contributor. He is a Democrat in poli- 
tics. He is a charter member of the Knisrhts of Malta, Lodge No. 350, Beacon 
Commanderv of Ruffsdale. Mr. Houser married Cora M. Leighty. daughter 
of M. T. and Eliza Leighty. and their chiklren are: Grover, born June 27, 1894; 
Mildred, May 7. 1897: and Corinne. December 4, 1901. 

JOSEPH P. LO\'E. a resident of .'\lverton. Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, and a man prominent and active in communitv affairs, was born 
in South Huntingdon township. .August 23. 1844. son of Benjamin and Mary 
(Tint«nian) Love. 

Benjamin Love, father, was a native of Ireland, who emigrated to this 
■country in companv with his father, Benjamin Love, settling in Pennsylvania. 



138 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



He was twelve years of age at the time of his arrival in this country, and spent 
the remainder of his life in South Huntingdon township, being engaged hi the 
butcher business and farming. He and his wife, Mary Tintsman, had sixteen 
children : Margaret, deceased, wife of Frederick Spielman ; Robert, deceased ; 
Elizabeth, deceased; Nancy, wife of James Hough; Benjamin, deceased; 
Abram, a farmer ; Sarah ; John, deceased ; Martha ; James, a carpenter of Scott- 
dale : Julia, deceased; Jane, died in infancy; David, a farmer; Joseph P., of 
whom later; Catherine, wife of Joseph Ruth, and Benjamin, deceased. Benja- 
min Love, the father of these children, died in 1862. 

Joseph P. Love received a common school education, and in early life 
learned the carpenter's trade, at which he worked for some years. When the 
cloud of war overspread the country in 1862, he enlisted in Company _B, Six- 
teenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, and served for a term of three years. Since his 
return to civil life he has been engaged in various avocations, giving most par- 
ticular attention, however, to the butcher business. In his jjolitical relations 
Mr. Love is a strong Republican, and served as justice of the peace for eleven 
years, assessor, collector, and, in short, in every township office with the single 
exception of school director. Mr. Love is deeply interested in all community 
affairs, and in all the positions of trust and responsibility to which he has been 
elected, he has discharged his duties most acceptably. He was appointed, July 
6, 1904, a rural mail carrier by the government, on No. 3 delivery from Mount 
Pleasant. He is a charter member of the Knights of Malta lodge in Scottdale. 
He married, October 31, 1871, Emma Tarr, daughter of Daniel and Frances 
(Teller) Tarr. and their children were: Jessie Frances, wife of Dr. G. C. 
Kneedler, of Alleghenv City; Edwin M.. a resident of Pittsburg, and Mazie 
\'iola, a graduate of the East Huntingdon high school, the Mount Pleasant 
Institute, and for three terms a teacher in the Alverton public school. 

WILLIAM L. STONER, deceased, for many years a representative 
citizen of Scottdale, was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, Novem- 
ber 10, 1848, a son of Joseph and Ann ( Lane) Stoner. 

In early life, after acquiring a common school education, he learned the 
trade of carpenter, becoming an expert mechanic as the result of close appli- 
cation to his work during his term of apprenticeship, and later became a con- 
tractor and builder, many of the finest buildings in the county standing as 
monuments to his skill and ability along these lines. Failing health forced him 
to abandon his work and in order to recuperate he started for Colorado, May 
15, 1888, but died at Wood River, Nebraska, June 5, 1888, passing away while 
vet in the prime of life. He was a consistent member of the United Brethren 
church, and a man of exemplary habits, honored and respected by a wide circle 
of friends and acquaintances. Mr. Stoner married Lucy A. Null, daughter of 
Jonathan and Mary (Seanor) Null, and granddaughter of Henry and Elizabeth 
(Paul) Null. Their children are: Maud'M., born November 12, 1873. a grad- 
uate of the Currv Business College, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, wife of J. Sheri- 
dan Bradley, a merchant of Scottdale. Harry Null, born March 2, 1876. an 
agent of Scottdale, also a graduate of the Curry Business College. He mar- 
ried Malinda A. Brothers, who bore him one child. Vernon Null, born De- 
cember 16, 1901 ; he married (second) Erma L. Gessner, who bore him one 
child, Frances Catharine, born July 29, 1904. Edna S.. born January 6, 1880, 
wife of Lloyd Hough, a machinist of Scottdale. Nellie O., born August 9, 1885, 
a graduate of the East Huntingdon high school, now serving in the capacity of 
teacher in the schools of East Huntingdon township. 



HISTORY Of U'ESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 139, 

EDWIN RUTH\'EX KISSELL. The grandfather of Edwin Ruth- 
ven Kissell, of Ligonier township, was WilHam Kissell, who was born and 
reared at Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, and was a stonemason by trade. He 
moved to Westmoreland county and settled in the Ligonier valley, where he 
followed his trade during the remainder of his life. William Kissell married- 
Sarah Witter, and their children were : George, deceased ; Frederick, deceased ^ 
Denial C, mentioned herafter ; Franklin ; John Wesley, deceased ; Matilda, de- 
ceased ; Lucinda, who became the wife of Solomon Grisword, and is deceased ; 
Jerome ; and \\'illiam Albert ; both of whom are deceased. The father of the 
family died in 1858. 

Daniel C. Kissell, son of \\'illiani and Sarah (Witter) Kissell, was born 
Alarch 28, 1838, in Lancaster City, and when a child was brought to West- 
moreland county by his parents. In early life he learned the carpenter's trade 
and followed it for some years in Pittsburg. For seven years he was car inspec- 
tor at Irwin for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. In 1871 he purchased 
the property where he now makes his home and which is known as the Kissell 
Spring Hotel. It was opened by him about 1877 and continuously conducted 
by him until 1899, when he resigned the management to his son Edwin Ruth- 
ven. Mr. Kissell married Marv Ann, daughter of Frederick Snyder, and their 
children are : DeWitt Clinton, Edwin Ruthven, mentioned hereafter ; John 
\\esley, \\'illiam S., Mildred D., married a Mr. Jack, of Pittsburg; Luella 
Alontrose, married Robert Gilligan ; Ralph, Ray B., and Kenneth Kingsley.. 
Mrs. Kissell died in 1898. 

Edwin Ruthven Kissell, son of Daniel C. and j\Iary Ann (.Snyder) Kissell„ 
was born September 15, 1866, at Irwin, Pennsylvania, and when about fourteen 
years old started for Scotland, but decided to go west, where he spent five 
years as a cow boy. At the end of that time he returned to Pennsylvania and 
worked as a carpenter and builder until after the death of his mother. About 
a year after that event he succeeded his father as proprietor of the Kissell 
Spring Hotel, a position which he has since successfully filled. The hotel is 
situated five miles northeast of Ligonier and is one of the best-known summer 
resorts in western Pennsylvania. ]\Ir. Kissell is a member of the West Fair- 
field church. He is a Republican in politics. He married Annie Esther, daugh- 
ter of Xoah H. and Mary Jane (Ross) Clarke. 

JOHX McCREARY. who was for many years a prominent and suc- 
cessful horse dealer in Westmoreland count}', Pennsylvania, was born in Alle- 
gheny township, November 28, 1845, the son of George and Sarah (Kline) 
]\IcCreary. 

John McCreary (great-grandfather) emigrated to this countrv from Ire- 
land in 1775. settling in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. There were three 
sons in the family, John, William and Henry. Having settled in a community 
in which the German language was spoken and taught in the parochial and 
subscription schools, they learned to speak this language, and it formed the 
basis of their education. About 1780 the three sons left their homes for the 
west, as it was then called. William and Henry went to Kentucky, where they 
prospered. 

John McCrcarv (grandfather) settled in Salem township in the village of 
New Salem, now Dclmf)nt. later removing from there to .\llcgheny township. 
His children were: John, Elizabeth, Mary, Samuel, Henry and George. John 
was a successful business man and was extensively engaged in farming and 
droving. He owned a fine farm in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, which he after- 



I40 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



ward made his home. He was a man of sterHng character, a Whig in pohtics, 
and a member of the Methodist church. He died in 1865. The death of John 
jMcCreary, Sr. occurred in 1844. 

George McCreary, the youngest son of John McCreary, and father of John 
McCrearv, was born on the old homestead, August 8, 1808. He ac(|uircd a 
common school education, was a farmer, an uncompromising Democrat in polir 
tics, and a member of the Lutheran church. He was rugged in sincerity and 
emphatic expression and act. He married Sarah Kline, a woman of amiable 
disposition, who was universally loved. Their children were: Levi, John, 
Hiram, Henry, Jane, Susan, Mary and Adda. 

There were no startling epochs in the life of John McCreary. In the busi- 
ness ho chose, that of dealing in horses, he was successful, because he was 
painstaking, energetic and honest. He had thousands of patrons in western 
Pennsylvania, with whom he dealt for more than a quarter of a century, with 
•ever-increasing confidence. He had none of the wiles so often practiced by 
members of his profession. The magnitude of his operations was remarkable, 
and for years he maintained a large .sales stable in Brooklyn, New York. He 
was a member of the Lutheran church, and always an active Democrat. In 
1884 he was the Democratic candidate for treasurer of Westmoreland county. 
He made a most gallant fight, but with all his colleagues on the ticket met de- 
feat. He never faltered in his devotion to Democracy. John McCreary mar- 
ried, January 11, 1886, Bethelda Cresswell, daughter of Samuel Stuart Cress- 
well, whose wife was Rachel Hylyer. Samuel Stuart Cresswell was a son of 
Samuel Cresswell and his wife. Elizabeth Stuart, a great-granddaughter of 
Charles Stuart, who was defeated in a battle for the British crown and com- 
pelled to fly to Spain. His wife and two children, a boy and a girl, were carried 
to the British colonies in America and sold for their passage money. Thev de- 
scended from the Scottish Highlands and participated in quelling the Irish re- 
bellion during the reign of King William. Samuel Stewart Cresswell was born 
near McCarricksburg, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, November 11, 1822, and 
died at Homer City, Indiana county. May 29, 1902. Mr. McCrearWs devotion 
to his father and mother never wavered. He saw that they were comfortable' 
during their lives. His business triumphs only increased his care and concern 
for those he loved. To his widow he left a handsome fortune as an evidence 
of his devotion. His last illness found him in the midst of his well-established 
and hopeful enterprises, and on the second day of November, 1903, death 
stopped the swift running current of a useful and successful life. 

J. LLOYD KALP. One of Mount Pleasant's enterprising business 
men of the younger generation is T. Llovd Kalp. He is a grandson of William 
K. and Margaret (A\'adsworth) Kalp, the former a farmer of Donegal town- 
ship. 

William Andrew Kalp, son of William K. and Margaret (Wadsworth) 
Kalp, was born May 15, 1857, i" Donegal township, was bred to farm life and 
educated in the public and normal schools. At the age of seventeen he began 
to teach, and for fourteen terms was an instructor in the country districts of 
Westmoreland county. He taught for two terms in Mount Pleasant, and at 
the age of twenty engaged in farming in connection with his work as a teacher. 
In 1890 he gave uo his farm and settled in ]\Iount Pleasant, where he soent 
the remainder of his life. He c-^ain became a teacher and also engaged for a 
time in the insurance business. Later he formed a nartnership and entered the 
hardware business, the firm beine known as Kalp, Mechling & Company. Sub- 
sequently it became Kalp & Mechling, remaining so until 1901 when Mr. Kalp 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 141 

withdrew his interest in the business and turjicd his attention to real estate 
and fire insurance. He carried on an extensive business in both insurance and 
realty, and was one of the founders of the Citizens' Jjuilding & Loan Associa- 
tion, in which from its inception until his death, he held the office of secretary. 
In connection with C. E. AiuUen he purchased and laid out in building lots the 
"Janies Xeel farm" in the borough of Mount Pleasant. He was one of the 
promoters of the i\Iount Pleasant Creamery Company and also of the Mount 
I'leasant Tool Company in both of whicn he was a stockholder, 
and of the latter was secretary of board of directors. He was 
secretary of the Berlin Electric Light Company, of Berlin, Pennsyl- 
vania^ and also of the Berlin Water Company, being part owner of both cor- 
porations. As secretary and treasurer he was connected with the Cedar Ridge 
Mines & Tunnel Company, of Idaho Springs, Colorado. Mr. Kalp was a benev- 
olent and public-spirited citizen as well as a successful business man, and was. 
one of the promoters of the JMount Pleasant Hospital antl the free dispensary,. 
acting as secretary of both. In Donegal township he held the office of justice 
of the peace, and in Mount Pleasant borough served as chief burgess and as a 
member of the school board. He was also a delegate to the Erie convention. 
He was first member of jNIarion Lodge, Xo. 562, F. and A. I\I., and also be- 
longed to Urania Chapter, Xo. 192, R. A. M., Kedron Commandery, Xo. 18. 
K. T., Valley Consistory of Pittsburg, A. A. S. R., Gaurgas Lodge of Perfec- 
tion, AIoss Rose Lodge, Xo. 350, I. O. O. P., the Royal Arcanum, and the 
Loval Association. He was one of the founders and one of the trustees of 
Lodge Xo. 868. B. P. O. E. 

Mr. Kalp married, June 16, 1877, Ellen Ulery, daughter of Frederiok and 
Rachael (Ellis) Ulerich, as the name was originally spelled. Frederick L'lerich 
was born December 16, 1817, in Prussia, and came to the United States when a 
lad of fourteen. He settled near Stahlstown, Westmoreland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he passed a part of his life as a farmer. His wife was of Scotch-. 
Irish extraction, ilr. and Mrs. Kalp were the parents of the following child- 
ren : I. J. Lloyd, mentioned hereafter. 2. William Lawrence, a graduate of 
Bucknell and a teacher in Mount Pleasant Institute. 3. Margaret Ellen, a stu- 
dent at Bucknell. 4. Maude Cecelia, wife of J. D. Springer, a real estate and 
insurance dealer of Uniontown, Pennsylvania. 5. Kathryn M., a stenographer. 
6. Bertha P., a student at Mount Pleasant Institute. 7. Viola R. 8. Clyde F. 
9. Earl A. The three last-named are attending the public schools. The death 
of Mr. Kalp occurred December 23, 1903, and was lamented by all who knew 
him as that of an upright and worthy citizen and a truly good man. 

J. Lloyd Kalp, son of William Andrew and Ellen (Ulery) Kalp, was born 
July 18, 1878. in Donegal township, and was educated in the public schools. 
Mount Pleasant Institute, graduating therefrom in class of 1899, and at Buck- 
nell University, graduating in the class of 1903. In that year and the preceding 
one he was assistant to the registrar of the University, and after graduation be- 
came principal of the public schools of Saltsburg, Indiana county. He came to 
Mount Pleasant upon the death of his father, whom he succeeded in the real 
estate business and also in the insurance interest. He is secretary of the Citi- 
zens' Building and Loan Association, secretary and treasurer of the Cedar 
Ridge Mines and Tunnel Company, director of Berlin Water Company, of 
Berlin, Somerset county, and secretary of board of directors of Mount Pleas- 
ant Tool Company. He is identified with Marion Lodge, Xo. 562, F. and A. 
M., the Royal Arcanum, AIoss Rose Lodge, Xo. 350, I. O. O. F., Encampment 



142 HISTORY OF ]VESTi\IORELAND COUNTY. 

No. 310 and Lodge No. 868, B. P. O. E. He married, September 14, 1905, 
Martha Wolfe, daughter of Charles Spiker Wolfe, deceased, of Lewisburg, 
Union county, Pennsylvania. 

JOSEPH W. SHELAR, one of the well-known and prominent physi- 
cians of Westmoreland county, was born in Niles, Trumbull count}*, Ohio, June 
.2, 1859. The Shelars in America originally came from Germany, and were 
.among the early settlers of Pennsylvania. The great-grandfather of Joseph W. 
Shelar was engaged in iron-manufacturing in Maryland before the war of the 
revolution, and his grandfather was a potter by trade, and made the first piece 
of earthen ware west of the Allegheny mountains, and is supposed to have lived 
in Westmoreland county. 

J. E. Shelar, father of Joseph W. Shelar, was burn in Trumbull county, 
■Ohio, in 1833. When a boy he learned the trade of roller, at which he worked 
up to 1870, when he was promoted to superintendent of the mills at Niles, Ohio. 
He served for a time as chief of police, and is prominent in councilmanic affairs. 
During the time of the war of the rebellion, Mr. Shelar enlisted in the Union 
army in the fall of 1863, in an Ohio regiment of volunteers. He entered as a 
private, and April, 1864, was mustered out as a corporal. In 1854 he married 
Celestia McEIwee, a daughter of Thomas McElwee, a native of Columbiana 
•county, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Shelar were members of the Presbyterian church. 
They were the parents of ten children, five sons and five daughters. 

Joseph W. Shelar, son of J. E. and Celestia (McElwee) Shelar, was edu- 
•cated in the public schools of his native place. His first regular employment 
was errand boy in a general store at Niles. On leaving this employment he at- 
tended the higli school of Niles for two terms, and from 1874 to 1877 served an 
apprenticeship in a printer's shop. At the expiration of this term he removed 
to Warren. Ohio, remaining but a short time, when he returned and found em- 
ployment in a nail factory. In 1881 he removed to Mount Pleasant, Westmore- 
land county, Pennsylvania, and entered the drug store of E. J. McElwee as 
■clerk. He remained there for a year, and then engaged in the management of a 
branch store of Mr. AIcElwee's, where he continued until 1884. Mr. Shelar 
■entered into the study of medicine in 1882, studying first under the preceptor- 
ship of Dr. J. E. Rigg, now of Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. In 1883 he en- 
tered the Long Island College Hospital at Brooklyn, New York, attended three 
courses of lectures, and was graduated in 1886. He began the practice of 
medicine that year at Stoner, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, continuing 
there until 1896, when he removed to Mount Pleasant, where he has since been 
■engaged in an extensive and lucrative practice. Dr. Shelar makes a specialty of 
diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, and his practice covers a wide range 
of territory. Dr. Shelar is a member of the surgical force of the Mount Pleas- 
ant Hospital, member of the Westmoreland County Medical Society, the Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America, the Independent Order of Odd Fllows, Moss Rose 
Lodge ; the Woodmen of the World, also the Grand Fraternity. He is medical 
■examiner for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, the Travelers' Insur- 
ance Company, and two of the fraternal societies. His political sympathies lie 
with the Republican party, in which he takes an active interest. He is a man of 
"broad and liberal views, and is well thought of throughout the communitv. 

In 1888 Dr. Shelar was united in marriage to Betta, a daughter of Solomon 
Stoner, of East Huntingdon township. In 1895 I\Irs. Shelar died, leaving the 
following children: Camille V., Ethel Blanche, and Sollie B. In 1897 Dr. 
Shelar married for his second wife Anna M. Boyd, daughter of J. F. and Han- 
nah Bovd, of Scottdale. 



HISTORY OF Jl'ESTMORELAXD COUNTY. 143 

CHARLES F. COLDS.MITH, one of the leading druggists of West- 
moreland county, was born in Alount Pleasant, JMarch 2, 1870, a son of John 
and Sarah (Brehan) Coldsniith. John Goldsmith was a native of eastern 
i'ennsylvania, and when a young man removed to \\'estmoreland county. He 
followed the occupation of a hatter, and was also engaged in the grocery bus- 
iness. He served as councilman of JMount Pleasant for some time and dis- 
charged the duties of that office with credit. 

Charles F. Coldsmith was reared in the borough of JMount Pleasant, and 
received a good general education in the public schools of that place. After leav- 
ing the school-room he entered in his first regular employment in the drug store 
of .Mr. 'SI. S. Kuhn, remaining there for eleven years. In 1897 Mr. Coldsmii'h 
and Mr. Kuhn bought out the drug establishment of Mr. E. J. McElwee, and 
conducted the business under the firm name of Coldsmith & Kuhn. Previous to 
this Mr. Coldsmith had taken a course of instruction in the Chicago School of 
Pharmacy, and became a thorough master of the profession. He is also a reg- 
istered pharmacist of Pennsylvania. His partnership with Mr. Kuhn existed 
until 1901, when jMr. Coldsmith succeeded to the ownership and management 
of the entire establishment, and it is now known as the Chrystal Pharmacy. 
The store is well stocked with a full line of drugs, medicine, etc., and he makes 
a specialty of filling prescriptions. The business is entirely successful and is 
considered one of the best drug establishments in the county. Politically Mr. 
Coldsmith is a strong Republican, takes a deep interest in the welfare of that 
organization and is an earnest party worker. He is a member of the Royal 
Arcanum, Independent Order Odd Fellows, and Knights of Malta. No. 350, 
Moss Rose Lodge, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 868. He is 
also a member of the National Association of Retail Druggists, and the West- 
moreland Druggists' Association. Mr. Coldsmith erected a handsome residence 
on Eagle street, ]\Iount Pleasant, where he has since resided. 

Charles F. Coldsmith was united in marriage to Daisy May Lozier, daugh- 
ter of Henry Lozier, of Mount Pleasant. The following named children were 
born to them : Daisv Alarie, deceased ; Eugene AIcKinley and Gertrude Gene- 
vieve. They are members of the Church of God and German Reformed 
church, respectively. 

WILLIAM McNAUGHTON. Among the energetic and enterpris- 
ing business men of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, perhaps no one has 
attained to a higher degree of success than William McNaughton. He was born 
in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. December 14, 1855, a son of James and Mary 
(Griven) McNaughton. His father was born and reared in Philadelphia, and 
was by trade a shoemaker. He traveled extensively, but spent the most of his 
life in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. He served some eighteen months in the Civil 
war in Knapp Battery. He married Mary Griven, a native of the north of 
Ireland, and the following named children were born to them: James, William, 
mentioned hereafter : Rebecca, Harry, Charley, Jennie, Kate, William, two chil- 
flren who died in childhood, and George. The father of this family died in 
1899, well advanced in years. 

William ^McNaughton was reared in Pittsburg, and educated in the com- 
mon schools of that city. At the age of nine years he left the school-room, en- 
tering into his first regular employment with the McKce Brothers Glass Manu- 
facturing establishment. His earnest and diligent work won rapid promotion 
for him, and he subsequently became a practical glass maker. He removed to 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, remaining there some fourteen years. After this 



144 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

he removed to Findlay, Uhio, and there became interested in the manufacture 
of glass. He became a member of a glass firm there and assisted in the estab- 
lishment of two glass plants. After some seven years spent in the state of Ohio 
Mr. McNaughton returned to Pennsylvania, associating himself with the Bryce 
Brothers as manager of their establishment, and in 1898 was admitted to the 
firm, and is now a member of the board of directors. Mr. McNaughton is pre- 
eminently a self-made man. Thrown upon his own resources at the tender age 
of nine years, with a very limited education, and no capital except determina- 
tion to succeed and willingness to work, Mr. McNaughton has by dint of those 
success-getting qualities — patient perseverance, unfailing energy and indomit- 
able will — advanced himself to an enviable place in the ranks of' successful and 
prosperous business men. In politics Mr. McNaughton accords with the doc- 
trines of the Republican party, and loses no o]Jiiortunity to advance the inter- 
ests of that organization. He is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks, No. 868, Mount Pleasant ; the Independent Order of Odd Fellovv's, 
Jefiferson Lodge, No. 12, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Knights of Pythias, Hylis 
Lodge. In 1898 Mr. McNaughton erected his handsome residence on Wash- 
ington street. Mount Pleasant. As a citizen he has the respect and esteem of 
his fellow townsmen and is well thought of throughout the coiumunity. 

In 1873 Mr. ]\IcNaughton was united in marriage to Mary A. Holmes, 
daughter of William Holmes, of Philadelphia. F'ennsylvania, and the following 
named children were born to them : William, in the employ of the Bryce Broth- 
ers. Laura, the wife of Aaron B. Shaw, of Mount Pleasant ; they have on© 
child, Elsie. Mary, residing at home. Howard, living at home. Mr. Mc- 
Naughton and his family are members of the church of L'nited Presbyterians. 

MYERS WORMAN HORNER, M. D., physician and surgeon, 
whose office is located at the corner of Main and Diamond streets. Mount Pleas- 
ant, is a native of that borough, born December 27, 1870, son of Isaac and Sarah 
(Myers) Horner, of Mount Pleasant township, Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Dr. Horner was reared to farm life, educated in the public schools, Alount 
Pleasant Institute, and Central State Normal school, Lock Haven, Pennsyl- 
vania, from which he was graduated in 1890. The following three years he, 
was engaged in the vocation of teaching, the first year in the district school of 
jMount Pleasant township, and the two succeeding years as vice-principal of 
Mount Pleasant schools. He then began the study of medicine in the Jefferson 
Medical College, Philadelphia, and graduated therefrom in 1896. The first 
three months after his graduation he practiced his profession in the city of Phil- 
adelphia, attending to the practice of Dr. Johnston. He then returned to his 
native place, jMount Pleasant, where he has since established for himself an 
enviable reputation and gained a large and remunerative practice. The suc- 
cess he has gained in his profession is due to his C[uickness of perception, 
promptness in action, capability, and tender and sympathetic disposition. He 
is a member of the United States pension examining board located at Scottdale, 
Westmoreland county, and is a member of the surgical staff of IMount Pleasant 
Hospital. Dr. Horner is a member of the Westmoreland County Medical So- 
ciety, of which he was president ; Pennsylvania State Medical Society, American 
Medical Association, the Association of the L^nited States Pension Examining 
Surgeons. He is president of the board of health of Mount Pleasant. He is 
affiliated with Marion Lodge, No. 562 Free and Accepted Masons, Scottdale; 
Moss Rose Lodge, No. 350, Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; Mount Pleas- 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 145 

ant Lodge, Xo. 868, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks ; the Protected 
Home Circle, American Order of United Workmen, of Mount Pleasant, and. 
the Pike Run Country Club, He is a member of the board of education, and. 
a member of Alount Pleasant fire department. 

Dr. Horner married, October 31, lyoi. Pearl Elvira Smith, who was bora 
in Alonnt Pleasant, February 22, 1872, daughter of William H. Smith, of Mount 
Pleasant. They are the parents of a child, Sarah Smith Horner, born Decem- 
ber 15, 1904. Dr. Horner is a member of the German Baptist Brethren church, 
and Mrs. Horner is a member of the Presbyterian church. 

JULIUS REICH^LW. One of the most useful of Mount Pleasants 
foreign-born citizens is Julius Reichman. He is a son of Joseph Reichman. He 
is a son of Joseph Reichman, who was a native of Austria Hungary and by 
trade a miller. His wife, Julia Reichman, bore him two sons: Joseph, and Ju- 
lius, mentioned hereafter. Mr. Reichman is now deceased and is survived 
bv his widow. 

Julius Reichman, son of Joseph and Julia Reichman, was born in Austria 
Hungarv, and was well educated in the colleges of Kaschau and Podolin. In 
1896, at' the age of eighteen, lie came to the United States and after being for 
a time variously employed obtained a position in an exchange bank in New 
York city. After remaining there nearly three years, he became manager of 3. 
branch office in the same line at Catasauqua, Pennsylvania, retaining that posi- 
tion until 1901. In that year he and his brother Joseph established their present 
business at 2\Ionnt Pleasant, under the firm name of Reichman Brothers. They 
are steamship agents and deal exclusively in foreign exchange, carrying on also 
a legal business'in the execution of deeds and the sale of property in all parts of 
Europe. Their connection with European attorneys is very extensive, and they 
translate into all languages both legal and private documents. The rules and 
regulations for the anthracite regions of Pennsylvania were translated by Mr. 
Julius Reichman, under whose personal supervision the business in Mount 
Pleasant is conducted. April 11, 1905, Julius Reichman bought his brother's 
interest in the business and is now sole proprietor. He is a member of the 
Eagles. 

Joseph Reichman, mentioned above as the brother of Julius Reichman,. 
was born in Austria Hungary, and came to this country in 189 1, being then 
eighteen years of age. He had been well educated in his native country and 
readily found a position in a banking house. He was a member of the firm of 
Reichman Brothers, but did not give his personal attention to the business. He 
is a resident of Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, where he is engaged under the 
firm name of John Nemeth & Company in a business similar to that conducted 
bv his brother in Mount Pleasant. 

HENRY JOHNSTON JORDAN. Among the popular citizens of 
Mount Pleasant must be numbered Henry Johnston Jordan, son of Johnston 
Barndollar and Lovina Christina (Shupe) Jordan, and was born April 25, 
1859. 

He was educated in the public schools, and while still in his teens was em- 
ployed at the Standard coal and coke works. He then assisted his father for 
two years in the hotel of which the latter was the proprietor, and in 1888 went 
to Connellsville, Pennsylvania, where for five years he was employed as a clerk. 
In 1893 he took charge of the National Hotel, of which his father had been 
the previous proprietor, and has since conducted the same. On becoming the 

2—10 



146 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

head of this estabHshment in which he has served an apprenticeship to the 
hotel business, Mr. Jordan refitted it throughout, making of it the largest and 
best-equipped hostelry in the borough. ;\Ir. Jordan gives his whole attention to 
die duties of his position, which he is admirably fitted to discharge. He has 
always been actively identified with every movement having for its object the 
welfare of the borough, and although not an otfice seeker has been frequently 
urged to accept positions of trust which he has steadily refused to do. He is 
a member of the County and State Hotel Men's Associations, a charter mem- 
ber of the Loyal Association of the Royal Arcanum, No. 97, and also belongs 
to the Royal Arcanum, No. 592, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, Ho. 
868, a charter member of Mount Pleasant Lodge, a member of the Pike Run 
Country Club, of which he was one of the charter members, also a member of 
The Homeless No. 26. In political affairs he is a staunch Republican, and is 
ever ready to give of his time and efforts for the welfare of the organization. 
He is a member of the county committee. Mr. Jordan married, January 2, 
1892, Eliza A., daughter of \\'illiam and ^lary Rush, of Connellsville, the 
former being now deceased. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Jordon : Gertrude E., Henry, died March 16, 1903, in his seventh year; Chris- 
tina Marie, and Josephine Elizabeth. Mrs. Jordan was born in Brownsville, 
Pennsylvania. 

^\'ILLL\M H. SAHTH. In the ranks of Mount Pleasanfs honoud 
citizens William H. Smith holds a foremost place. The father of Mr. Smith, 
Joseph Smith, 'settled in Derry township on a tract of one hundred and thiriy- 
six acres of land, which he cleared and on which he erected good buildings. 
He was a useful citizen and a worthy man, taking an active part in politics and 
also in church affairs. Joseph Smith married Christina Speilman, who like 
himself was of German descent, and they were the parents of thirteen children : 
Ephraim, born October 8, 1817, now resides near Pleasant Unity, being the sole 
survivor of the family with the exception of his brother William H. John, who 
was a shoemaker in Derry township ; Catharine, who died in infancy ; Jacob, 
who was a carpenter in Derry towship : Mary, who became the wife of Henry 
Bussard ; Susan, married George Rupert ; Elizabeth, who was the wife of a 
Mr. Brinnell ; Joseph, who was a tinner, and emigrated to Ohio where he died ; 
Katie, married Henry Auckeman ; Christiana, who was the wife of Seth Baugh- 
man, and after his death married again and moved to Indiana ; Jones, who was 
a miller at Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania ; Andrew, who was a laborer and fence- 
builder of LTnity township; William H., mentioned hereafter. Mr. Smith, the 
father of this numerous family, died on his farm in 1829, at the age of sixty- 
four. 

William H. Smith, son of Joseph and Christina (Speilman) Smith, was 
born October 28, 1825, in Derry township, just above Latrobe, where he passed 
his boyhood. At the age of sixteen he went to Liscipes, Unity township, to 
learn the blacksmith's trade, remaining there about eighteen months. In the 
spring of 1844 he went to Mount Pleasant with his employer. Matthew McAIil- 
lan, for whom he worked eight months after finishing his apprenticeship. He 
and his nephew, Joseph Smith, then bought out the business which thev con- 
ducted together for about a year. Joseph Smith then decided to go to the 
Mexican war and in consequence the business was sold out. Air. Smith for eigh- 
teen months thereafter working as a journeyman for W'illiam H. Smith. At 
the end of that time Mr. Smith purchased the business and continued to conduct 
it in that place until 1885, doing the work of a general blacksmith. In 1876 




THE 

NEW YORK 

'rUBUJCUBBABY\ 







HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTV. 147 

he purchased a stock of hardware and established a business under the firm 
name of Smith & Company, the business being looked after by Mr. Rumbaugh, 
the partner, while ^Ir. Smith gave bis attention to his trade. In 1885, as before 
stated, he disposed by sale of the smithy and engaged personally in the hard- 
ware business. In 1889 Mr. Rumbaugh died, his Interest was purchased by I\lr. 
Smith's son, \Mlliam F. Smith, and the name of the firm was changed to its 
present fonn of W. H. Smith & Son. ^ They carry a complete line of hardware, 
also buggies, wagons, farm implements, harnesses, robes, blankets, and in fact 
everything that bears a relationship to the business.. The main storeroom has a 
depth of one hundred and fifty feet, with basement, and one of the two ware- 
houses is forty by forty feet and consists of three stories, while the other, which 
has one story, is twenty by forty feet. This is the largest hardware establish- 
ment in Blount Pleasant, and the business has grown until it has assumed a 
magnitude equal to any of the kind to be found outside the limits of a large 
citv. ^Ir. Smith's career as a business man contains a wholesome lesson for 
the youth of the present day, being an example of one who is a self-made man 
in tiie best sense of the term. Beginning with a salary of four dollars per 
month, he stands to-day as one of the solitl business men of that part of West- 
moreland county, his success being entirely due to close application to business 
and strict adherence to the principles of honorable and upright dealing. iMr. 
Smith is a public-spirited citizen, and about 1870 laid out a small addition to the 
town, known as Smith's addition, through which Smithfield street runs, and 
which consists of eight building lots with a plot of about one acre additional. 
He served two terms as burgess of ]\Iount Pleasant, and for nine years was a 
member of the council. He has been for many years a devoted member of the 
Presbyterian church in Mount Pleasant. Mr. Smith married, August 10, 1848, 
Sarah, born in Bradford, Pennsylvania, daughter of Joseph (libbs. and their 
children were: George W., a blacksmith in Mount Pleasant; Annie E., Nor- 
man, Catharine, wife of S. C. Stevenson, of Mount Pleasant ; Charles K., died 
at the age of twenty-five years : William F., mentioned hereafter ; Oma and 
Pearl (twins), the former is deceased and the latter is the wife of Dr. M. W. 
Horner, of Blount Pleasant. In 1898 Mr. .Smith and his children were deeply 
afflicted by the death of the wife and mother, who passed away at the age of 
seventy-two. Mr. Smith has seven grandchildren as follows : S. Jean, Sarah 
E., William, Herbert N., William Stevenson, Viola Stevenson, and Sarah 
Horner. 

William F. Smith, mentioned above, is the junior member of the hardware 
firm of \\ . H. Smith & Son. He is pa.st master of Scottdale Lodge. No. 562, 
F. and A. M. and trustee of Mount Pleasant Lodge, No. 868, B. P. O. E. He 
also belongs to \Moss Rose Lodge, No 350, I. O. O. F., Encampment, and Pike 
Run Country Club. He married Mary A. Shaefifer, of Johnstown, Pennsyl- 
vania, and they have two children : S. Jean and Sarah E. 

GEORGE J. SEANOR. sheriff nf Westmoreland county. Pennsyl- 
vania, well and favorably known in that section of Pennsylvania, is a re]5resen- 
tative in the present generation of a family whose earlier members were among 
the first settlers of the state. The Seanors came originally from Germany. 

Adam Seanor. grandfather of George J- Seanor, was born near Seanors 
churcH. Westmoreland county, toward the latter part of the eighteenth century, 
and died in 1864, aged about sixty-nine years. In politics he was a member of 
the \\'hig party, and in religious faith was a Presbyterian. He married Eliza- 
heth Harrold. born three miles snulli of Grccnsburg. Pennsyl\'ania, and Iheir 



148 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

children were: Mary, married Jonathan Null, died in 1885; John, died 1885; 
Lewis, died in Washington state in 1904; George, died of fever at the age of 
twenty-six; Adam, of whom later; William, died in 1903; Henry, a resident of 
Kansas. 

Adam Seanor. fourth son and fifth child of Adam and Elizabeth (Har- 
rold) Seanor, was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 1831. He 
had the advantage of a good common school education, and upon attaining a 
proper age turned his attention to farming and stock raising. This calling he 
followed all the active years of his life. He is prominently identified with the 
Presbyterian church, and affiliates with the Republican party. He married 
Salina Tweedy, daughter of William Tweedy, and they had ten children, the 
names of eight of whom are here given : Elizabeth, born 1854, died at the age 
of sixty-seven years ; Louisa, 1856, married David Kepple ; Emma, 1858, mar- 
ried Wilson Kepple; Harry F., July 29, i860, married, September, 1881, at 
Latrobc, Pennsylvania, Larus P. JMcKelvy, ( See sketch of Harry F. Seanor) ; 
William, 1864, married Mary Kepple ; Elmer, married Mattie Laughlin ; Mag- 
gie, 1866, died May 25, 1905, married Samuel Kepple, and was the mother of 
ten children, nine of whom survive her ; George J., of whom later ; Charles, 
1874, married Laura Hofl:"nian. 

George J. Seanor, son of Adam and Salina (Tweedy) Seanor, was born in 
Salem township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, March 24, 1872. He 
was educated in the common schools of Westmoreland county, and farmed until 
he attained his majority, when he engaged with lijs brother Harry F. in the 
sale of farm implements and machinery at home as well as in other cities for 
three years. He then went to Springfield, Ohio, and accepted a position with 
the O. S. Kelly Company, traveling for them as an expert on steam street 
rollers throughout the United States. He was thus occupied for two years, 
and then went to the World's Fair at Chicago to take charge of their special 
exhibit. At the close of the fair he returned to Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania, and again entered into business associations with his brother. He 
then entered the employ of the McCormiek Harvest Machine Company as 
salesman, and remained with them for a period of about five years. In the 
fall of 1904, he was elected sheriff of Westmoreland county, and is now serv- 
ing his term of office in that capacity. He was elected by the largest majority 
ever accorded a Republican candidate for this office in this section of the coun- 
try. He had previously served as deputy sheriff under his brother Harry F. 
and also under Sheriff B. F. May. He has always been active, prominent and in- 
fluntial in the ranks of the Republican party. Mr. Seanor is also largely inter- 
ested in real estate transactions, and in buying and selling fine breeds of horses. 
Mr. Seanor married, September 24, 1894, Alice R. Keiser, born September 14, 
1872, daughter of Adam and Maria (Bolinger) Keiser. Mrs. Seanor's parents 
were born and married in Derry township, where her father was a farmer for 
almost fifty years, his death occurring January 17, 1900; his wife, born May 24, 
1832, is still living. They were both members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. 
George J. Seanor and his wife have children : Adam Carleton, born .\ugust 5, 
1895 ; Anita Maria, June 17, 1902. 

LLOYD KOONTZ, proprietor of the Mount Pleasant Bottling 
works, one of the leading industries of that place, and one of the leading- 
young business men of the borough, where he is universally respected ana 
honored for his many excellent traits of character, was born October i, 1879, 
in Somerset countv, Pennsvlvania. 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAXD COUXTV. 149 

Henry Koontz, father of Lloyd Koontz, was born July 6, 1855. near Som- 
erset, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, and there reared and educated. He served 
an apprenticeship at the trade of wheelwright, becoming an expert mechanic, 
and for many years followed the same, up to 1902. In 1885 he changed his place 
of residence to \\"estmoreland county, and at the present time (1905) is a resi- 
dent of Zilount Pleasant. He serves in the capacity of assistant to his son 
Lloyd, in the bottling works operated by him. He is an honored member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. By his marriage to Elizabeth Baugh- 
man the following named children were born : Lloyd, George, Anna, Emma, 
and ;\Iyrtle. The family hold membership in the Reformed Church of Alount 
Pleasant. 

Lloyd Koontz, the eldest child in the family above mentioned, was 
reared in Mount Pleasant and received his education in the public schools 
thereof. At the early age of ten years he entered the bottling works of Fred- 
erick Wehner, established by him in 1885, and operated by him for a period of 
about eight years. The plant then came into the possession of George Baugh- 
man, who conducted the same for a number of years, Lloyd Koontz remaining 
an employe, and in 1902 he purchased the same from Mr. Baughman and has 
conducted it in a successful manner ever since. He bottles all kinds of soft 
drinks, and the plant has a capacity of about eight hundred cases per day, and is 
frequently taxed to its utmost limit in order to supply the demand. Mr. Koontz 
is a charter member of Lodge Xo. 868, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. Lodge Xo. 496, Fraternal Order of Eagles, of Mount Pleasant and Coun- 
cil Xo. 296, Roval Arcanum. ]\Ir. Koontz is unmarried. 

JOHX" R. BLACK. No name stands higher in the mercantile circles 
of Mount Pleasant than that of John R. Black, who comes of an old Mercer 
county family. His grandfather, Adam Black, was a man who figured con- 
spicuously in local, state and national affairs, and for several years represented 
Mercer county in the Pennsylvania legislature. He was prosperous and had 
the reputation of being wealthy. He and his wife had the following children : 
Harriet, married Scott iMcCready. of Bedford, Pennsylvania : Sarah, married 
J. M. Fitzgerald, of ]\Iaquoketa, Iowa; Caroline, married T. \V. ]Morrow, of 
Butler county, Pennsylvania ; a daughter who died single : and Henry Calvin, 
mentioned hereafter. The death of Mr. Black occurred in Harrisburg. in 1848, 
while he was serving his fourth term as a member of the legislature. 

Henry Calvin Black, son of Adam Black, was born in 1838, and was reared 
on the farm in Mercer county, being but ten years of age at the time of his 
father's death. He was educated in the public schools and at Duff's Business 
College, Pittsburg. When a young man he engaged in mercantile business in 
Blacktown, Mercer county, and later moved to Harrisville, Butler county, 
where he was in business more than thirty-seven years. He was a successful 
merchant, and was prominent in public affairs. He was one of the recognized 
leaders of the Republican partv in that section of the country, and was ever ready 
to aid the best interests of the organization. Though frequently urged to ac- 
cept office he invariably declined, but often acted as delegate to conventions. 
He was an artivs member of the Presbyterian church, in which for many years 
he held the office of elder. Mr. Black married Adaline, daughter of P. X. and 
Jane (McCoy) Painter, of Mercer county, and the following children were born 
to them: i. Robert Xewton, who was a dry goods merchant at Grove City, 
Mercer county, and died October 8, 1903. at the aee of forty-two. leaving a 
widow and one child. 2. Austa M., wife of W. C. Hawn, a merchant of But- 



I50 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

ler coiintv. 3. John R., mentioned hereafter. 4. Florence E., wife of C. W. 
Hood, a druggist of East Pittsburg. 5. Nora M. 6. James G., who was edu- 
cated at Grove City College, and engaged in the dry goods business ; he mar- 
ried Mabel Carson, of Maquoketa, Iowa, and they have two children: ]\Iar- 
guerite, and Harold Calvin. Mr. Black, the father, died October, 1894, at the 
comparatively early age of fifty-four. 

John R. Black', son of Henry Calvin and Adalinc ( fainter) Black, was edu- 
cated at Grove City College, and learned the dry goods business from his father 
by whom he was ultimately taken into partnership, the name of the firm being 
H. C. Black & Son. After the death of his father the firm assumed its present 
style of J. R. Black & Company, the junior partner being Florence E. (Black) 
Hood, mentioned above. In 1899 they moved from their native Butler county, 
where thev had hitherto dwelt, to Mount Pleasant, where they succeeded to the 
business of King & Mullen. The establishment has since been enlarged in 
everv respect and is now the largest of its kind in the borough. Mr. Black be- 
longs to Mount Pleasant Lodge,'No. 868, B. P. O. E., the R. A., the Maccabees, 
and various other fraternal orders. He and his wife are members of the E'nited 
Presbyterian church. Mr. Black married, in 1897, in Harrisville, Pennsylvania, 
Ida M., daughter of Hon. W. P. Braham, of that place, and they are the parents 
of two children : Helen and Carl Braham Black. 

SMITH McClelland ALBRIGHT, proprietor of Albright's 
restaurant and confectionery, one of the leading and best patronized establish- 
ments in Mount Pleasant, which he has conducted since 1896, was born in Pres- 
ton county, West Virginia, in the vicinity of Kingwood, October 3, 1862. His 
parents are William and Rachel Albright, the former a miller by trade, whose 
operations have been conducted on an extensive scale. His grandfather, David 
Albright, emigrated from Gemiany and settled in We.st Virginia, purchasing 
large tracts of land near what is known as Albrightsville, a town named in his 
honor. He owned and operated a large distillery, conveying his goods to and 
from Baltimore. Maryland, by wagon, and in addition to this he operated a 
ferry across the Cheat river. He was a man of the strictest integrity, and by 
commendable industry and patient perseverance he carved out for himself a 
successful and enviable career. 

Smith McC. Albright obtained the educational advantages aiiforded by the 
public schools of his neighborhood, which he attended until fourteen years of 
age. He then accepted a clerkship, remaining until he attained his majority, 
after which he engaged in the general merchandise business at Frienrlsville, 
Maryland, under the firm name of Gibson & Albright, where he remained 
eighteen months. He then came to Stahlstown, Pennsylvania, and in the fall 
of 1886 took up his abode at Mount Pleasant and engaged at clerking. The 
following year he returned to West Virginia, where he remained until 1891, and 
then returned to ]\Iount Pleasant, Pennsvlvania, and for five years served in the 
capacity of clerk. At the expiration of that period of time he established his 
present business, that of restaurant, ice cream parlor and confectionery store. 
He began business in the building adjoining his present place, and after remain- 
ing there five years accumulated sufficient capital to purchase ground and erect 
a building of his own. a two-story structure, wherein he conducts a large and 
profitable trade. In 1899 he erected a fine frame residence on College avenue. 
Mount Pleasant, also a bakery, renting the latter, but this property he disposed 
of in T901 at an advantageous price. In the spring of 1877 he became a mem- 
ber of Moss Rose Lodge, No. 350, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 151 

wliich he is now noble grand : a member of Ezra Encampment. Xo. 310; a 
member of the Royal Arcannm. Xo. 592 : and a member of Imjiroved (Jrder of 
He]itasoplis, Xo. 173. 

Mr. Albright married, December 25. 1SS3, Keziah Irvin. wlin died Octo- 
ber. 1885, leaving- one child. J'.ertha Grace. Jannary i, 1888, Mr. Albright mar- 
ried Dora A. Davenport, a native of Mount Pleasant, Pennsylvania, daughter 
of Alexander and Hanali Davenport, natives of Xew York state. Two chil- 
dren are the issue of this marriage: Eva ^lay, and Emma Leona. The family 
attend the Methodist Episcopal church. 

ELMER R. SPRINGER, a member of the firm of Goodman & 
Springer, photographers, successors to A. M. Slaufter. whose place of business 
is located at Xo. 603 Main street. Mount Pleasant, is a native of Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, born September 14, 1876, son of Joseph F. and Hannah 
J. (Davidson) Springer, who were the parents of thirteen children, nine of 
whom are living at the present time (1905), as follows: Thomas Xewton, 
James Chalfont, Harry Johnston, Lewis Walter. Charles Alden, Howard, Elmer 
Rutan. Emma Mary, and Hallie May. The mother of these children, who was 
a daughter of the late Rev James Davidson, of Belle Vernon. Pennsylvania, 
died August 14, 1898. She is survived by her husband, who is a resident of 
Circleville. Westmoreland county, where he is leading a retired life. He was a 
farmer by occupation, was a Republican and later a Prohibitionist in politics, 
and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

The boyhood of Elmer R. Springer was spent on his father's farm, and he 
devoted his time alternatelv in assisting with the work thereon and in attend- 
ance at the public schools, as is the custom of boys reared in the country. 
L'pon attaining his majority he went to Scottdale and there learned the trade 
of photography, and in 1899 entered into partnership with Robert Goodman at 
the place mentioned above. This is the oldest established photograph gallery 
in the town of Mount Pleasant, and their work, both indoor and out, being of 
a high order of workmanship and finish, they receive a large share of the 
patronage of the residents of the town and also from adjoining towns, and 
they have the prospect of a long and remunerative business career before them. 
Mr. Springer is a member of Lodge Xo. 868, Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, Royal Arcanum. Pennsylvania Photoghaphers' Association, and the 
volunteer fire department of Mount Pleasant. Mr. Springer was married 
February 21. 1900, to Bertha Laura Lee, daughter of Robert T. and Eleanor 
Lee, of Circleville, ^^'estmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and they are the pat- 
ents of one child, Laura Eleanor, born June 7. 1903. Mr. and Mrs. Springer 
are active and consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

FRANK S. DI'LLIXGER. proprietor of the Alount Pleasant Steam 
Laundry, is a native of that township, born July 29, 1876, son of Jolm and 
Catherine (Trent) Dullinger. and grandson of Samuel and Elizabeth Dulliiitrer. 
Samuel Dullinger was a member of the Reformed church ; he was survived by 
his wife, who passed away March, 1904. at the advanced age of ninetv-four 
years. 

John Dullinger (father) was a native of this section of the counl\-. He 
was a teamster by occujjation and a very prosperous man of business. During 
the Civil war he enlisted in the One Hundred and Forty-fifth Regiment. Penn- 
sylvania Cavalry, with which he served three years. He j)articii)ated in twenty- 
eight battles, and the only wound he received was a slight one in the hand at 



152 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

the battle of Gettysburg. He was a member of the American Order of United 
Workmen, Lodge No. 350, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Independent 
Order of Red Men, and Grand Army of the Republic. He was a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, as is also his wife, whose maiden name was 
Catherine Trent, and who bore him five children, namely : William ; Emma, wife 
■of C. A. Springer, of Mount Pleasant ; Anna, wife of S. G. Miller, of Home- 
wood ; Edwin, deceased ; and Frank S., mentioned hereafter. John Dullinger 
'.father) died in 1900, aged fifty-six years.] His widow is living at the present 
time (1905), residing in Mount Pleasant. 

Frank S. Dullinger was educated in the public schools of his native town 
and at Mount Pleasant Institute. At the age of fifteen years he began to earn a 
livelihood for himself, becoming an employe in the Mount Pleasant Laundry, 
then under the proprietorship of G. C. Galley, and there he learned the business 
thoroughly, becoming highly proficient in all its branches. March 18, 1 90 1, 
after ten years service with Mr. Galley, he purchased the plant and has since 
made many changes therein, adding from time to time new machinery to the 
number of seven machines, and at the present time he has one of the most com- 
pletely equipped plants in that section of the county. He covers a large terri- 
tory outside of Mount Pleasant, which includes Scottdale, LTnity and other 
places, and he has a number of agencies in various parts of the county. He 
makes a specialty of high-class work, which fact accounts for the extensive 
patronage accorded him. Mr. Dullinger is a member of Lodge No. 350, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, Royal Arcanum, and Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, Lodge No. 868. Mr. Dullinger married, February 28, 1900, 
Minnie M. Clark, daughter of Roger and Amanda Clark, who reside near 
Hemminger Mills, Westmoreland county. The issue of this marriage was two 
children: Edmund and Clinton. Mr. and Mrs. Dullinger are active members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and are among the representative people of 
Mount Pleasant. 

JAMES GRIBBIN, one of the old and honored residents of ■Motmt 
Pleasant, is a native of county Derry, Ireland, his birthplace being about twenty- 
for-T miles from Belfast, and the date of his birth December 26, 1845. He is a 
son of Patrick and Frances (Mulholland) Gribbin. 

He was reared and educated in his native land, remaining there until 
twenty-two years of age, when he went to Glasgow, Scotland, and in i86g came 
to the United States, locating first at Holyoke, Massachusetts, where he resided 
for six months. He then came to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and for seven 
years was employed in a wholesale liquor establishment conducted by a cousin. 
In March, 1877, he took up his residence in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he 
was employed as teamster, and in 1880 he removed to Mount Pleasant, West- 
moreland county, his present place of abode. The first sixteen years of his resi- 
dence there he was employed at the Standard Coal works, after which he en- 
gaged in the hotel business, erecting the Mount Pleasant Hotel, which he con- 
ducted for eight years, at the expiration of which time he purchased the prop- 
erty. This is one of the oldest hotels in ]\Iount Pleasant, and also ®ne of the 
best patronized, this being due to the genialitv of the priprietor, the excellence 
of the cuisine, and the courteous treatment tendered to guests and patrons. 
Five years after his arrival in this countrv Mr. Gribbin became a natrrphVed 
citizen, and since then has taken an active interest in all that pertains toward its 
welfare and development. He is a Democrat in politics, and exercises a notent 
influence in behalf of the party whose principles he advocates. Mr. Gribbin is a 



HISTORY OF IVESTMORELJXD COUXTV. 153 

man of thrift and perseverance, and he has steadily worked his way njjward 
until now he ranks among the wealthy and influential residents of his coni- 
munity. 

Mr. Gribbin married. June. 1876. Bridget Gribbin, who bore him the follow- 
ing children : Alary, wife of John P. Logan, of Wilmington, Delaware, a 
plumber, and they are the parents of two children : Thomas and James Logan. 
Frances, wife of Michael ^ilullan, of JMount Pleasant, who is employed as bar- 
tender for Mr. Gribbin in his hotel: they are the parents of three children: 
Thomas, James and John IMullan. Hugh, who asists his father in the manage- 
luent of the hotel ; he married Annie McKinna, who bore him one child, Mary 
Gribbin. Eliza, who resides with her parents. Frances, deceased. The family 
.attend St. Joseph Catholic church of Mount Pleasant. 

ANDREW JOHNSON GEYER, a representative citizen of Scott- 
dale, in which borough he has been an active and potent factor for many 
years in the promotion of its varied interests, political, financial, industrial and 
•social, was born at Schellsburg, Bedford county, Pennsylvania, October 27, 
1866, son of Henry Garber and Catharine (Rettinger) Geyer, and a representa- 
tive of a family of which one or more members in each generation have been 
active participants in the wars in which America has engaged. 

John \\'illiam Geyer, the pioneer ancestor of the American branch of the 
iamily, and a descendant of Flavan von Geyer. one of the leaders of the rebellion 
in Germany about the year 1400, was born in Germany, November 12, 1723. 
In 1749 he emigrated to America, returned to his native land in 1751, and the 
following year again came to this country, locating in Pennsylvania, from 
■whence he removed to Annapolis. [Maryland. He married, November 17, 1752, 
Anna Alarie Reeler, who was born in the vicinity of Reading, Pennsylvania, 
September to, 1725. and six children were the issue of this union : Conrad, John, 
Henry, JNIichael, Catharine and Anna Margaret. John William Geyer and 
his two sons — Conrad and Henry — served as privates in the Revolutionary war, 
and were with General Washington during his perilous journey across the Dela- 
Avare river. Mr. Geyer died February 7, 1808, and his wife passed awav No- 
vember 26, 1806. 

Henry Geyer, third son of John William and Anna I\Iarie (Reeler) Geyer, 
was born Februar\- 12, 1756, died 1833. ^^y l^^s marriage to Catharine Kurtz 
the following children were born: Catharine, Conrad, Mary, George, Eliza- 
beth. Frederick, Jonas, Susan, and Sarah Geyer. 

Conrad Geyer. eldest son of Henry and Catharine (Kurtz) Geyer, was born 
June i^, 1792, in Philadelohia, Pennsylvania. He married. May i, 1833, Sus- 
aima Garber, of Reading, Pennsylvania, born July to, 1807, and six children 
were the issue of this union, as follows: Mary, died in infancy: Sarah, also 
died in infancy : Henry (Jarber. John Calvin, Anna Marie, and Susanna. In 
early life he emigrated to Berks and afterwards to Bedford county, and his 
■chief employment was teaming between Cumberland, Maryland, and Wheeling, 
Mrginia, on the National road or old pike. .\ heavi.ly loaded wagon passed 
over his foot and from the effects of the injiuy tluis received he died at his home 
in Schcllsbnre. Bedford countv, July i, 1864, in the seventy-second year of his 
age. His v.ifc died July 9, 1879. 

Henry Garber Geyer, eldest son of Conrad and- Susanna (Garber) Geyer, 
was born at Schellsburg. Bedford county. May 4, 1834. He was reared on a 
farm and followed farming for a number of vears, after which he turned his 
attention to carpentering and contracting, which occupations he followed in 



154 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

the borough of Scottdale, whither he moved to on May 15, 1873. I" '^^2 he 
erected a large frame hotel, known as the Geyer House, which he successfully 
conducted until his death, and was the first landlord at Scottdale to obtain li- 
cense after the passage of the local option law. He was an active member of 
the Reformed church, which he joined in Schellsburg, in 1851. He was a Dem- 
ocrat in politics, but the only office he ever held was that of squire, and his com- 
mission bearing the signature of Andrew G. Curtin is still in the possession of 
the family. Ill health prevented him from joining the army in 1862 with his 
brother John, who enlisted as a private in Company H, Fifty-fifth Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was promoted for bravery to the rank of first 
lieutenant and adjutant. He married, January 2, 1863, Catharine Rettinger, 
who was born February 20, 1843, in the vicinity of Mann's Choice. Iledford 
county, Pennsylvania, her parents having come to this country in 1830, locating^ 
near Mann's Choice. Their children are as follows : John Calvin, Andrew 
Johnson, Anna Mary, who became the wife of George A. Smith, of Cleveland, 
Ohio : Margaret Ellen, who became the wife of J. J. Price, of Clinton, Missouri ; 
and William Henry. Henry Garber Geyer (father) died December 11, 1884, 
and since then his widow has conducted the hotel. 

Andrew J. Geyer, second son of the late Henry Garber and Catharine 
(Rettinger) Geyer, graduated at St. Vincent College in 1888, after which he 
pursued a special course in architecture at the University of Pennsylvania. For 
a number of years he was the editor and proprietor of the Scottdale Herald, 
this being the only Democratic paper ever pubhshed in that borough. He has 
been awarded the contract for the designing of churches, school houses, business 
blocks and dwellings in various parts of four states, and in igoo he designed and 
built the Geyer Theatre in Scottdale, in the management of which he has since 
been engaged. He was instrumental in the organization of the Broadway 
National Bank in 1902. and has served since then as a member of the board of 
directors, also filling a similar position in the F. A. Black Manufacturing Com- 
pany. He was nominated on the Democratic ticket for the office of town coun- 
cilman, and was elected in a Republican stronghold by a large majority, a fact 
which testified to his popularity as a citizen. During the Spanish-American war 
he enlisted in Company E, Eighteenth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer In- 
fantry, and was mustered out at the close of hostilities. In 1884 Mr. Geyer 
joined the Trinity Reformed church, and since 1901 has served in an official 
capacity. He is a member of Lodge No. 562, Free and Accepted ^Masons ; 
Jerusalem Chapter, No. 3, Royal Arch Masons, this being the oldest chapter in 
the United States : Lodge No. yjy, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks ; 
and the Royal Arcanum. 

Mr. Geyer married, November 25, 1902, at Wilkensburg, Pennsylvania, 
Nora Virts Sewell, who was educated in the public schools of Scottdale, and the 
issue of this marriage was one child, Andrew Johnson, Jr., born March 14, 
1904, at Scottdale, Mrs. Geyer is a daughter of Colonel George H. and Jen- 
nie (Home) Sewell, who were united in marriage in 1872. Colonel Sewell' 
was born in Baltimore, Maryland, June 20, 1849, enlisted as a drummer boy in 
Company B, First Maryland Regiment, and was later transferred to the secret 
service, where he remained until the close of the war. His wife, who was a na- 
tive of Allegheny county, Maryland, died April 23, 1896. Colonel Sewell was 
a son of the Rev. Thomas Sewell, a lineal descendant of Pocohontas, who in 
1835 ^^'3s appointed collector of the port of Baltimore, which position he held' 
for eight rears. 




ei^mnJa^, 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 155, 

PATRICK J. AIALOY, the genial and popular proprietor of the 
Kromer House, Scottdale, Pennsylvania, is a native of that state, born in North 
Uniontown. June 15, 1867, son of Patrick and Mary (Mullen) }iIaloy, both na- 
tives of county (ialloway, Ireland. They came to the United States about 
1S51-52. visitetl different localities, and finally located in Pittsburg, where they 
remained until 1865, when they took up their abode in Fayette county and have 
since resided there. Patrick Maloy served the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Com- 
pany for many years as section boss, but is now leading a retired life, enjoying 
the competence he accumulated during his years of activity. Their family con- 
sists of four children : John, employed as clerk in the Kromer House, conducted 
by his brother, Patrick J. !Maloy ; Mary; Patrick J., mentioned hereafter; and 
Matthew, engaged in the construction of iron at Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Patrick J. Maloy was reared and educated at Uniontown, his birthplace, 
and in the spring of 1900 engaged in the hotel business at jMasontown, Pennsyl- 
vania, under the firm name of Maloy and Johnson, but the following year, De- 
cember 18, came to the borough of Scottdale and has since assumed complete 
control of the Kromer House. Under his efficient management the hotel has 
been entirely renovated, and is now the leading hostelry in that locality. The 
house contains forty-five rooms, which are cheerful and well furnished, and the 
table is abundantly supplied with the best that the market affords. No one more 
fully understands or better provides for the entertainment and accommodation 
of the public than Mr. ^laloy, who is ever obliging and courteous, and in this 
way he has secured a large and liberal patronage. His political affiliations are 
with the Democratic party, but in local politics he casts his vote for the candi- 
date who in his opinion is best suited for office. He is a member of Scottdale 
Lodge, No. Jjy, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. November 24, 1896, 
I\Ir. Maloy was married to Grace McNally, and they are -the parents of four 
children : Raymond J., Josiah T., John Donald and Arnold Edward. The fam- 
ily are members of the Catholic church. 

JOHN W. ]\IC)ODY, well and favorably known in religious and liter- 
ary circles, was born at ^liddle Rasen, Lincolnshire. England, October 6, 1846. 
His father, John Moody, was a miller, his machinery having three motive 
powers, wind, water and steam. When the wind failed, water was used, and 
when there was a scarity of water resort was had to a steam engine of primitive 
construction. The paternal ancestry of Mr. Moody were mostly engaged in 
agricultural pursuits. His father, besides being an active business man, was 
popular as a local preacher in the Methodist denomination. He had not been 
able to acciuire a very extended education, but he was possessed of a natural 
eloquence and a gift of language which caused his services to be in constant de- 
mand, especiall'- on such occasions as the anniversaries of rural churches, etc. 
IMr. Moody's family on the maternal side moved in somewhat higher circles. 

Mr. Moody was educated in the national schools of England, and later 
took a classical course in the Brigg ( Lincolnshire) grammar school, where 
many men of note prepared for Cambridge and Oxford. Failing health obliged 
him to curtail his studies, and when still ciuite a youth was apprenticed to 
Hinchcliffe & Llfjlliday, of Hull, Yorkshire, England, to learn the art of print- 
ing and journalism in general. He remained here four years, obtaining a prac- 
tical knowledge of every branch of this business. At the end of this period the 
firm failed and went out of business. Mr. Moody was worn out with his hard 
work of reporting for a morning newspaper, The Uitll Daily Express, and his 
jihysician orderetl him into the country. At the age of eigiitecn years he was 



156 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

again bound apprentice, this time to a firm of grocers, J. T. & T. Varlow, of 
Brigg, Lincolnsliire, England. He finished his apprenticeship with this firm 
and continued in this business until he was twenty-three years old, then again 
turning his attention to journalism. For a time he was engaged on the Gains- 
borough Nezvs, at Gainsborough, England, and then was assistant editor of the 
High Peak News, at Bakewcll, Derbyshire, England, at the same time editing 
the Higli Peak Tourist's Guide, a society paper published at Buxton, the scene 
of one of the novels of Walter Scott. From Buxton he removed with his fam- 
ily to Preston, in Lancashire, and there became assistant editor of the Preston 
Chronicle, a widely circulated paper under the editorship of Anthony Hewitson, 
an uncompromising radical. 

i\Ir. Moody's thoughts had often turned to the new world as oiifering a bet- 
ter field for him than the okl, and a favorable opportunity offering at this time 
he took advantage of it in the spring of 1872 and came to America for the first 
time. A few days after landing he obtained employment on the True American, 
then owned by Naar, Day & Naar, at Trenton, New Jersey. The following 
spring he went into business on his own account, starting the Chambersburg 
Weekly Nezvs, (afterwards changed to the Mercer County Nezvs) which was a 
■decided success notwithstanding the fact that it was a time of great panic and 
depression in business circles. About this tinies Mr. Moody, who had always 
been a great student, took up the study of theology. These studies finally led 
to the ministry, and in January, 1882, he was unanimously called to the pastorate 
of the Central Baptist church, at Junction, New Jersey, and was there ordained, 
September 27, 1882. He remained here for two years, and his success is at- 
tested by the fact that the membership of the church was tripled and a new 
church was organized at Washington, New Jersey, which is now in a very 
flourishing condition. In this work, as in his entire subsequent career, Mr. 
Moody gives much of the credit of his success to his wife. Again failing health 
suggested need of a change, and he accepted a call from Athens, New York, a 
beautiful village near the Hudson river. Here he labored for five years with 
his usual success, and then removed to Monongahela, Pennsylvania, where he 
served as pastor for three years. While in this town, in association with others, 
lie started a denominational weekly known as Tlie Baptist Exponent. From 
individual ownership to a joint stock company, composed of men who knew noth- 
ing of journalism but insisted upon managing the affairs, the descent to failure 
was swift and sure. ]\Ir. Moody, however, had retired from the editorshi]) six 
months before this culmination. From Monongahela he removed to Sewickley, 
Pennsylvania, and there was pastor of the Baptist church for five years. Dur- 
ing the greater part of this time he was a contributor to the press, both secular 
and relig-ious. At the suggestion of friends he assumed control of the Baptist 
E.vpositor at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and edited the same for some time, until 
it was sold to the Baptist Coninioiizvealh of Philadelphia, and incorporated 
therewith. From Sewickley he assumed the pastorate of the old Peter's Creek 
church, at Library, Pennsylvania, where he remained two years, and then re- 
ceived a call from the First Baptist church of Scottdale, Pennsylvania, iri 
w'hich he served for nearly six years, resigning his pastorate in order to organize 
the Scottdale Printing & Publishing Company. This company, of which he is 
secretary, treasurer, manager and editor, purchased the Scottdale Independent, 
an old and well-established weekly. This paper was enlarged and improved, 
and in September, 1904. a daily edition was started, which gives great promise 
of success. While no longer in the ministry Mr. Moody frequently occupies 
pulpits in neighboring towns and cities. Elliott G. Moody, of Trenton, New 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 1,57 

Jersey, who has held various positions of trust in the city and state of late 
years', is the only brother of John W. .Moody, and Mrs. John Rowe, of Barnsley,. 
Yorkshire, England, is his only sister. 

John W. Aloody married, January 26, 1870, :Mary Elizabeth Gray, one of a 
famiiv of ten children, daughter of Air. and Airs. Thomas Gray, of Long Sut- 
ton, Lincolnshire, England^ who subsequently removed to Peterborough, Eng- 
land, where they died arid are buried, and where most of the family now reside, 
some engaged in building and contracting, and others retired from business. 
Air. Gray, while a farmer by occupation, was a mechanical genius, constructing, 
with his'own hands some unique articles, both useful and ornamental. Several 
members of this family have inherited this gift, and have utilized it to great 
protit and advantage in the course of their lives. Mr. and Airs. Moody have 
two children : \\'allace Elliott, born in Gainsborough, England, December 5, 
1870. He is married and has three children. Jessie Mabelle, born at Trenton, 
New Jersey, Alarch 10, 1874. She married W. W. Stewart, eldest son of one 
of the oldest and wealthiest families of the rural districts of Allegheny county, 
and resides on the old Stewart homestead at Stewart, near Finleyville, which 
has been the home of the family for several generations. She is the mother of 
two children. 

THOMAS JOSEPH DISKIN,an active and enterprising young busi- 
ness man of the borough of Scottdale, who has contributed in no small measure- 
to its growth and prosperity, was born in the community in which he now re- 
sides. Alarch 2, 187S, son of Thomas and Alary Diskin, natives of Scottdale. 

He attended the public schools of Scottdale until ten years of age, when his 
parents removed to Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, and he then attended the public 
schools of that city, also the Bellefonte Academy, from which institutions he 
was graduated. He continued his studies at the Central State College, graduat- 
ing therefrom in February, 1898, after which he was a student at Duffs Busi- 
ness College, from which he also graduated. He then engaged in the real estate, 
mortgages, and insurance business, which he still continues, and in which he has 
achieved a large degree of success. In the latter branch of the business he han- 
dles life, accident and fire insurance, representing some of the best companies, 
namely : Springfield Fire & Alarine : Prussian National, of Stettin, Germany ; 
Teutonia, of Allegheny City ; Allemannia, of Pittsburg ; Armenia, of Pittsburg ; 
Star, of Lexington, Kentucky: Capital, of Hartford, Connecticut; New York 
Life ; and the American Casuality, of Reading. Since the establishment of his 
business. Xovember, 1898. it has steadily increased in volume and importance, 
which fact is attributable to his honorable and straightforward methods of con- 
ducting business, and to the high and irreproachable character he bears among 
his fellowmen, who esteem him very highly. He has erected and placed on the 
market about twelve buildings in the borough of Scottdale, all of which were 
modern in their appointments, and by their architectural beauty added greatly 
to the attractiveness of the locality. Air. Diskin is an Independent in politics. 
Air. Diskin married, September 15, 1903, Anna Irene Dolan. of Butler, Penn- 
sylvania, daughter of Daniel and Alargaret Dolan, the former named bemg an 
oil operator of West Virginia. One child was the issue of this marriage, Mary 
Alargaret. Air. and Mrs. Diskin are members of the Catholic church. 

JOHN C. STEINER. justice of the peace of the borough of Scottdale, 
a veteran of the Civil war, and an active and public-sjjirited citizen, promoting 
to the best of his abilitv the interests of the communitv in which he resides, was 



.J 58 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

born in Hempfield township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, Mav 26, 
1839, son of Philip and Elizabeth ( Fox) Steiner, and grandson of John Steiner. 

John Steiner (grandfather) came from Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, 
to Westmoreland county about the time of his marriage or shortly afterward. 
He located in Hempfield township and there purchased a farm of about one hun- 
dred and fifty acres, which he cultivateil and imjjroved, and whereupon he he- 
sided until his decease, when he was upwards of eightv years of age. He was a 
man of character and standing in the community, devoted to his home and fam- 
ily, and a consistent member of the Reformed church. He was a descendant of 
a German ancestry. His wife, who was a Miss Wentzel prior to her marriage, 
bore him children : Jacob, a hatter ; Daniel, a mason ; Joseph, a mason ; Philip, 
mentioned hereafter: Henry, a blacksmith: John, a farmer: Hannah, married 
David Million: Elizabeth, married Michael Eisenman ; and Marv, married John 
B. Miller. 

Philip Steiner (father) was born in Hempfield township, Westmoreland 
county, 1812, and died in 1894, having spent his entire life in his native township. 
He learned the trade of hatter during his boyhood with his brother Jacob in the 
village of Adamsburg, Westmoreland county. He followed this line of work 
for several years, then gave his attention to agricultural pursuits, and later 
worked at the trade of tinner, conducting a shop of his own until he attained the 
age of sixty-five years, when he retired from active business. As early as 1845 
he served as supervisor of the township, and later served as supervisor, perform- 
ing the duties carefully and conscientiously. He was a member and elder for 
many years in the Lutheran church, and was an adherent of Republican princi- 
ples. He married Elizabeth Fox, daughter of Philip and Sarah (Campbell) 
Fox, the latter a native of Mercer county, Pennsylvania. Their children were : 
John C, mentioned hereafter : Maria, wife of John W. Finxel, of New Staunton, 
Pa. : Sylvester, a resident of Millersdale, Pa. ; Henry V., a resident of New 
Staunton, Pa. ; David P., deceased : Elsie C, wife of I. W. More, of New 
Stranton, Pa. : and Hannah, died in infancy. 

John C. Steiner was reared in his native township, Hempfield, and educated 
in the public schools thereof. He worked at the trade of tinner with his father, 
and at the age of eighteen learned the trade of shoemaker which he followed up 
"to 1885, conducting an establishment of his own in New Staunton, his business 
being one of the best and most extensive in that locality. In 1879 he was 
elected justice of the peace, which office he filled until 1894. Two years later 
he took up his abode in Scottdale, his present residence, and in 1901 was elected 
justice of the peace on the Democratic ticket, receiving a majority of two hun- 
dred and thirty-six votes. This attested to his popularity, as the borough has a 
Republican majority of four hundred and fifty votes. He is faithful and effi- 
cient in the performance of his duties, and has had very few reversals as he 
weighs carefully the evidence in each and everv case brought before him. He 
also served as constalile from 1875 to 1879. He enlisted, in 1863, in the Fifty- 
fourth Pennsylvania Militia, and August 30. 1864, became a member of Com- 
pany K, Two Hundred and Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He 
received a gunshot wound in the head at the battle of Petersburg, April 2, 1865, 
and was removed to a hospital, where he remained until his discharge from the 
service at the close of the war, June 22, 1865. He is a member of Colonel Ells- 
worth's Post, No. 209, of Scottdale, of which he is past commander. He is a 
member of Three Graces Lodge, No. 934, I. O. O. F., at Madison, Pennsyl- 
vania, and of A. O. U. K. M., No. 342, of Scottdale. He is efficient and well- 
liked as a public official, and stands deservedly high as a citizen of the county. 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 159 

He married, August 9, i860, Harriet C. Pool, daughter of John and Elizabeth 
(Hauser) Pool. She was born in Hempfield township, and bore her husband 
children: Curtin Philip, a hotel proprietor; Lizzie M., wife of L. M. Hays, of 
East Greensburg, Pa. : Charles E., of Scottdale, employed as conductor on the 
Pennsylvania railroatl ; Katie T., wife of James B. Funk, of Xew Staunton, Pa. ; 
Samuel O., cigar manufacturer of Scottdale; Annie IM., unmarried ; Joseph Mc- 
Kee, cigar manufacturer. Scottdale; and Sarah W'., unmarried. The family 
are members of the Lutheran church of Scottdale. 

The firm of Steiner Brothers, cigar manufacturers and dealers, conducting 
business at No. 103 Pittsburg street, Scottdale, is composed of Samuel O. and 
Joseph AIcKee Steiner, mentioned above. This firm was successor to C. P. 
Steiner, who succeeded B. C. Fritz, who was successor to Daniel Wilhelm. 
\\'hen the present firm took charge of the business in 1896, it was conducted on 
a small scale, operating three hands a portion of the time, but they at once put 
new life into it, and have increased gradually until at the present time (1905) 
the}- give constant employment to fourteen people. They manufacture stogies 
exclusivelv, all the various grades, and their goods find a ready sale in many 
states of the union. In their salesrooms they handle all kinds of cigars, tobacco 
and smokers' supplies, also stationery, newspapers, periodicals and various other 
articles along that line. The proprietors of this business are among the ener- 
getic young business men of Scottdale, are men of character and standing, and 
in every way worthy of the success which has crowned their eliforts. Samuel O. 
born September 17, 1873, is a stockholder in two of the banks of Scottdale. a 
member of the Lutheran church, in which he serves in various official capacities, 
and also active in the Sabbath School connected therewith, and a member of the 
A. O. L". W., of which he is a collector. He married, August 24, 1904, 
Lillian B. Leichleiter, daughter of L. B. Leichleiter, of Everson, Fayette county. 
Joseph IMcKee, born February 14, 1875, is also a stockholder in two of the banks 
of Scottdale, a member of the B. P. O. E., Scottdale Lodge, No. yyj. also R. 
A. He married, November 20, 1901, Catherine O'Neill, daughter of Charles 
O'Neill, of Everson, Pennsylvania. 

JOHN S. PARKER, a prominent and influential merchant, head of 
the J. S. Parker Company, of Scottdale, whose successful career is ample evi- 
dence of what a man can accomplish by energy, perseverance, concentration and 
good business sagacity, was born in West Newton, Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania, January 28, 1842, son of John S. and Jane (Graham) Parker, natives 
of Ohio and Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, respectively. 

John S. Parker ( father ) came to Westmoreland county when a young man 
from his native state, CAio, which was then the western frontier of civilization, 
and at once engaged in mercantile business at West Newton. Later he re- 
moved to Reagantown and there conducted the same line of business until his 
death in 1857, ^^ the age of sixty-five years. He was a substantial citizen, and 
always took a deep interest in every enterprise that tended toward the public 
good. He was stanch Democrat in politics, a consistent memljcr of the Presby- 
terian church, in which body he was active officially, and a soldier of the War 
of 1812. His wife, whose maiden name was Jane Graham, was a native of 
Westmoreland county, a member of the Presbyterian church, and a woman ef 
remarkable business ability. After the death of her husband .she conducted the 
business successfully for many years, aided bv her sons. She died in 1882, aged 
eighty years. Their family consisted of nine children : Sarah Ann, deceased, 
who was the wife of James Weddlc ; Eliza Jane, deceased, who was the wife of 



i6o HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



James P. Ward: Rebecca, deceased, who was the wife of James JMcL'une; Har- 
riet, wife of Abraham Rufif, of Mount Pleasant ; Nancy Ellen, widow of James 

B. Smith, of Scottdalc : Eii])hemia, wife of John Hurst, of Scottdale ; John S., 
mentione hereafter ; 'Richard G., a resident of Huntingdon township ; George 

C, who is associated with his brother John S. in business. George C. was born 
in the vicinity of West Newton, October, 1847. He was educated in the public 
schools, and his training in the mercantile line was obtained in his father's store. 
About 1873 he and his brother Richard G. established a business at Reagantown, 
conducting a general merchandise store until 1880, and the following year he 
came to Scottdale and engaged in business with his brother John S., with whom 
he has been associated contmuously, being at the present time (1905) a member 
of the firm. He is one of the organized stockholders of the Savings & Trust 
Company of Scottdale. He was married August, i8y(), to Ida K. Fry, daughter 
of David and Susan Fry. They are members of the Presbyterian church of 
Scottdale. 

John S. Parker obtained his education in the schools of Reagantown and 
West Newton. After the death of the father he assisted his mother in the con- 
duct of the store, rendering valuable service. In February, 1873, he formed a 
partnership with his brother-in-law, James Vt. Smith, and engaged in the mer- 
cantile business at Scottdale under the firm name of Parker & Smith, which 
connection contiiuicd until 1881, when Mr. Smith withdrew and S. B. McMillan 
and George C. Parker became members of the firm. The name was then 
changed to J. S. Parker & Co., and so continued until 1884, when Mr. McMillan 
retired and the firm name became J. S. Parker & Bro., and continued as such 
until 1896, when the firm name was changed to J. S. Parker Co., as it stands 
today. They began business in a very small way, their stock consisting of gro- 
ceries and a limited amount of dry goods. In 1890 the grocery department was" 
eliminated. He now carries a full line of dry goods, notions, jewelry, men's and 
boy's clothing, ladies' ready-to-wear suits, millinery, carpets, window shades, 
curtains, linoleum and numerous other articles to be found in a first-class general 
mercantile establishment. He has occupied the same corner, Pittsburg and 
Spring streets, and the old building was enlarged from time to time to meet the 
growing demands of the business. In 1903 it was torn down and on the site 
was erected a fine three-story brick — pressed gray — building, 66x100, two floors 
of which thcv occupy, there being only one establishment in the county which 
occupies more floor space, and this establishment now stands in the front ranks 
of mercantile enterprises. Mr. Parker is one of the energetic, active business 
men of the borough, and has taken a deep interest in all enterprises that have 
been inaugurated, among which might be mentioned : The Scottdale Iron and 
Steel Company, limited, the pipe mill, the machine shop, and in 1901 he became 
one of the promoters of the Scottdale Savings & Trust Company, of which he 
is a director, and January, 1905, was elected president of the same. He also 
built one of the first houses erected in Scottdale. He is a member and trustee 
of the First Presbyterian church, to the support and maintenance of which he 
contributes liberally. 

November 11, 1869, Mr. Parker was united in marriage to Pauline Rufif, 
daughter of Jonas and Ruth Rufif, of ]\Iount Pleasant township. Mrs. Parker 
died in 1890, leaving five children: Richard H., an associate of his father in 
business : Frank R.. an associate of his father in business : he married Olive An- 
derson, and their children are : Clyde, Gertrude and Pauline : Jane G., Effie May, 
Clyde, who died at the age of six years. In 1894 Mr. Parker married for his 
second wife, Mrs. Charlotte Johnson, nee Trader, of Uniontown, Pennsylvania. 



HISTORY OF U'ESTMORELAXD COUXTV. i6i 

HURST FAMILY. Between iluckinghani mountain and the 
Wrightstown line la)- two tracts of land of one thousand acres each which were 
patented to John Reynolds and Edward West, respectively, neither of whom 
ever settled on the land or made any claim to it. On these tracts in the first 
part of the eighteenth century settled sons of the earlier settlers of the commun- 
ity and a number of Scotch-Irish emigrants, who improved the land, and later 
they or the representatives of those that died thereon, sold the "Improvement," 
and in most cases the title was acquired by "adverse possession," though some 
of the tracts were later confirmed by patent. Among those early settlers was 
John Hirst, as the name was then spelled, who was supposed to have been a na- 
tive of England, and was of English or possibly Scotch-Irish origin. He died 
in Buckingham about 1754, and his widow, Ann Hirst, administered on his es- 
tate and sold the "Imjirovement" and his personal estate. On December 11, 
1754, she petitioned the Orphans' court of Bucks county, setting forth these 
facts, and asked that auditors be appointed to pass upon and settle her accounts 
of administration. She also states that the decedent left "divers children who 
are under the age of twenty-one years," and asked that guardians be appointed 
for them so that the distribution of the estate might be made. She then gave 
the names and ages of the children, as follows : 

"Xancy Hirst was 21 on ye 28th day of July, 1754-" 
"Betty Hirst was 20 on ye 4th day of October, 1754." 
"John Hirst was 18 on ye 3i.st day of August, 1754." 
"William Hirst was 14 on ye 5th day of October, 1754." 
"Sarah Hirst was 12 on ye 5th day of February, 1754." 
"Richard Hirst was 10 on ye loth day of March, 1754." 
"Judah Hirst was 7 on ye 17th day of May, 1734." 

The Improvement was sold for one hundred and fift_\'-four pounds and ten 
schillings, and must therefore have been of considerable acreage. The balance 
shown by the account was two hundred and forty-eight pounds, eleven shillings 
and two pence, but no distribution appears of record, therefore there is nothing 
to show who the children were who were already of age in 1754. Of the above 
named family John and William Hirst settled in Solebury ; in 1760 John Hirst 
married Hilary Heston, daughter of Zebulon Heston, of Wrightstown, having 
applied for membership at Buckingham Friends ^Meeting in 1759. Their chil- 
dren were: John, Rebeckah, Sarah. Jesse, David and Ann. They left Bucks 
county about 1774. William, the other brother, married Ann Thomas, April 
25, 1761 ; he was a blacksmith by trade. 

Xathaniel Hurst, who is supposed to have been one of the older children in 
the family of John and Ann Hirst, left his home in Bucks county and obtained 
a warrant Of survey for three hundred acres of land in Westmoreland county, 
April 3, 1774, for three hundred acres additional, July i, 1784, and 
for two hundred and eighty-five acres and twenty-three perches, Februarv 10, 
1796. He and his wife crossed the mountains on pack horses, and settled about 
five miles from what is now the borough of Mount Pleasant, where he took up 
nine hundred acres of wild land, above mentioned, which is now^ known as the 
Hurst Settlement. Here they erected a log cabin and began life under the 
most adverse circumstances, as the Indians were on all sides of them, and many 
nights when the husband and father was out watching for an attack bv the In- 
dians, the mother with her little family would seek shelter in the underbrush, 
feeling safer there than in the cabin. By degrees thcy cleared and cultivated 
the land, which soon became productive and yielded tliem a goodly return for 
their labor. They lived to be well advanced in years, were respected by their 



i62 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

neighbors, and the supposition is that they were members of the Presbyterian 
church. Their children were as follows: Nathaniel, a farmer, who spent his 
life in Mount Pleasant township ; Thomas, a farmer of Mount Pleasant town- 
ship ; James, mentioned hereafter; and John, who located and reared a large 
family on a farm purchased for him by his father. 

James Hurst, son of Nathaniel Hurst, the founder of the family in West- 
moreland county, was born, reared and spent his life in Mount Pleasant town- 
ship. He followed the occupation of farming, owning a portion of the original 
homestead, possibly upwards of two Jiundred acres, and was one of the pros- 
perous and thrifty men of the community. He married Sarah Blackston, 
daughter of James B. Blackston, of Fayette county, Pennsylvania. Their fam- 
ily consisted of the following cliildren : James B., mentioned hereafter ; Joseph, 
who was a farmer of Mount Pleasant township ; John, who resided for some 
years in Fayette county, where his death occurred ; Nathaniel, who was a farmer 
of Fayette county ; Nancy, who became the wife of Ebenezer Moore, a farmer 
of Fayette county ; and Priscilla, who became the wife of Samuel Miller, a 
farmer who resided in the vicinity of Latrobe. 

James B. Hurst, son of James and Sarah (Blackston) Hurst, was born in 
VVestmoreknd county, Pennsylvania, in 1799. He w-as reared on the old home- 
stead in Mount Pleasant township, and prior to his marriage settled on a farm 
in Tyrone township, Fayette count}-, where he resided at the time of his death 
from' apoplexy in 1845. About the year 1829 he married ]\Iary Long, daughter 
of Alexander Long, and her birth occurred in Tyrone township, Fayette county, 
about 1812 or 1813. Their children were: Alexander, deceased: Prissly, de- 
ceased ; Sarah, deceased-, who was the wife of a Mr. Shallenberger ; William, 
deceased: John, mentioned hereafter; and Frances, deceased, who was the wife 
of J. W. Shawman. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Hurst was married 
to James Cunningham, by whom she had two children: Elias L., proprietor of 
a hotel at North East, Pennsylvania ; and Mary J., deceased. 

John Hurst, son of Fames B. and Mary (Long) Hurst, was born July 6, 
1839, in Fayette county, Pennsylvania. He was reared on his father's farm, 
educated in the common schools, and followed farming until his removal to 
Scottdale, Westmoreland county, in 1882. Here he established a mercantile 
business, which was later taken charge of by his sons, William and Harry R., 
who conducted the same for a time and then disposed of it to outside parties. 
During this time, however, he was employed at the trade of carpenter, which he 
followed for several years. In 1903 he erected a fine pressed straw colored brick 
block, one of the finest in the borough of Scottdale, at the corner of Pittston and 
Hickorv streets, in which his son Harry R. has established a dry goods store 
on the first floor and rear of the second ffoor, and the front part of the sec- 
ond floor is occupied by Mr. Hurst and family as a residence, and the 
third floor is divided into apartments for residential purposes. He is a 
man who has always had the best interests of the community at heart, and 
is ready to assist in any way toward the betterment and uplifting of man- 
kind. He was a member of the school board of the borough for six years, 
rendering valuable service during that period. He is a member of the Pres- 
hyterian church. In April, i860, he married Euphemia Parker, daughter of 
lohn Parker, who bore him the following children: Mary J., died in April, 
"1904, aged forty years ; she was the wife of William Owen, also deceased ; 
Williani, mentioned hereafter ; Harry R., mentioned hereafter ; Candace, wife 
of G. F. Kelly, who is engaged in the real estate and insurance business at Scott- 
dale ; Gertrude, unmarried^ James B., who is engaged in the clothing and fur- 



HISTORY OF JJ-ESTMORELAND COUNTY. 163 

nisliing business at Scottdalc : and Edward, who is a student in the Tennsyl- 
vania State College. 

William P. Hurst, eldest son of John and Eupheniia (Parker) Hurst, was 
born laiuiarv 26. 1863. He was educated in the jniblic schools and remained 
on the farm' until iSSo, when he came to Scottdale and in company with his 
brother Harry R. conducted a mercantile establishment for several years. In 
18S9 lie engaged in the coal business, prospecting and locating coal properties in 
Kentucky, ^Vest \"irginia and Ohio for other parties, and in i8yi began oper- 
ating on' his own account at Smock, Fayette county, wdiere he opened mines 
which he operated until 1894, when he disposed of the same. In 1895 he opened 
mines at Pine Hill, Somerset county, which he operated until 1898, and then dis- 
posed of them. He then entered \Vest \'irginia, locating in Barbour and Pres- 
ton counties, where they will operate on an extensive scale, and having in view 
the establishing of a large coking plant, operating under the firm name of the 
^Midland Coal and Coke Company. He was also the promoter of the Clements 
Coal and Coke Company, Barbour county, West Virginia, the Candace Coal 
and Coke Company. Barbour county, West Virginia, and the Kingwood 
Coal and Coke Company, Preston county. West Virginia. Mr. Hurst is man- 
ager of the above named plants and virtually takes the same roll for the Mid- 
land Coal and Coke Company. The whole scheme covers a territory of about 
nine thousand acres, and all of the properties produce a good grade of coking 
coal. He is one of the live, energetic men of the county, and stands in the front 
rank of the best people in the community. 

Harrv R. Hurst, second son of John and Euphemia (Parker) Hurst, was 
born .August 9, 1865. He attended the common scliocls until sixteen years of 
age. and then engaged at clerking for Keister & Co., at Owensdale, Fa_\-ette 
county, a company store, where he remained two years. He then came to 
Scottdale with J. S. Parker & Co., whom he served for five or six years, and 
was then employed with E. Dunn at Connellsville, proprietor of a dry goods 
store, for five years. He had, however, during this time had charge of the dry 
goods establishment of Hurst & Co., which position he held until engaging in 
his present business, in 1899, succeeding W. J. Murphy, a dry goods mer- 
chant. He located on Pittston street and there remained until 1903. when he 
moved into his ])resent handsome quarters in the block erected by his father. 
He has a space of forty by one hundred feet, and the first floor is devoted to 
dry goods, notions, and ladies suits, wdiile the second floor is well stocked with 
a full line of carpets, oil cloths, linoleums, lace curtains, window shades, etc. 
His stock is clean and of the very finest quality, up-to-date in every respect, 
and is one of the best selected and most attractive in that section of the county. 
He is a thorough business man. prompt and reliable in all his transactions, and 
his name is a synonym for integrity. Mr. Hurst married, January i, 1896, 
Harriet .Anderson, daughter of George W. and Amanda (Smith) Anderson, a 
native of Westmoreland county. Two children are the issue of this imion : 
Jolm R.. and William W. The family are members of the Presbyterian cluirch. 

P. O. PETERSON, president of the Peterson Business College, one 
of the leading educational institutions of the borough of Scottdale, of which he 
was also the founder, is a young man of more than usual business capacitv, full 
of energy, vigor and vim. He was born in the vicinity of Pleasant I'nity, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania. May 24, 1876. 

His great-grandfather on the patern3l side came from Germany during the 
latter half of the eighteenth centurv, and settled in New Ycirk state. Elias 



i64 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

Peterson (grandfather J, son of the founder of the family, was born and reared 
in New York state, and when a young man came to Pennsyvania and settled 
near Pleasant Unity, Westmoreland county, where he purchased a farm which 
he cultivated and operated during the remainder of his lifetime. He was one 
of the successful and representative farmers of his day and communit}-, and 
wielded an influence for good in his neighborhood. He was a devout Christian 
man, and an elder in the Presbyterian church. He was twice married. His 
first wife, whose maiden name was Margaret McCall, bore him eight children, 
all now deceased, but who attained years of maturity, namely : Thomas, Elias, 
Henry, James, Abner, John, Hannah, and Margaret. The sons went west and 
became prosperous and prominent men, James having been a jurist in Kansas, 
Abner a jurist in Illinois, and Henry a state senator from Iowa. His second 
wife, whose maiden name was Elizabeth McChesney, bore him five children : 
Jennie, who died at the age of twenty-one years ; Harriet, who died in young 
womanhood ; Sarah, wife of George Geiger, residing on the old Peterson home- 
stead near Pleasant Unity ; Aaron, a shoe dealer of Mount Pleasant ; and Noah 
G., mentioned hereafter. Elias Peterson (grandfather) died in 1855, aged six- 
ty-seven years. 

Noah G. Peterson (father), son of Elias and Elizabeth (McChesney) Pe- 
terson, was born on the old homestead, reared to farm life, educated in the 
])ublic schools and academies, and received a business training in the X'ermilian 
Institute. During the time of securing his education he was also engaged in 
teaching, beginning the latter vocation when a lad of but sixteen. He taught 
and attended school for some ten years thereafter, since which time he has fol- 
lowed various callings, principally, however, that of farming and bookkeeping, 
and in 1903 he associated himself with his son in the conduct of the Peterson 
Business College at Scottdale, he taking charge of the commercial department, 
bookkeeping, etc. He is a member of the Reformed church. He was married 
November 27, 1873, to Rachel Smith, daughter of Henry and Lavina (Fiscus) 
Smith, and three children were the issue : A child who died in infancy ; P. C)., 
mentioned hereafter ; and Elizabeth, who was educated at California State Nor- 
mal and Pennsylvania Business College, and is now (1905) principal of the 
shorthand department in the Peterson Business College of Scottdale. 

P. O. Peterson was reared on a farm and received his primary education 
in the public schools of the neighborhood. This was supplemented by a course 
at the California State Normal school at California, Pennsylvania, graduating, 
in the class of 1900; the Bliss Commercial College, from which he was gradu- 
ated ; the Zanerian Art College, of Columbus, Ohio. He had, however, taught 
public school for five years in Westmoreland county prior, to attending the 
State Normal. In 1902 he began work as a teacher in a business college at 
McKeesport. Pennsylvania, and in the fall of 1903 established the Peterson 
Business College at Scottdale, and although there are two old established insti- 
tutions within a radius of some fourteen miles, the school has prospered and 
the first class graduated in June, 1904, comprising forty-five finished pupils, 
which is an evidence of the vim with which the school was inaugurated and 
started on its way. The school gives a complete and thorough business train- 
ing in all its various branches, but they make a specialty of penmanship, book- 
keeping, shorthand and typewriting, but at the same time all the other branches 
relating to a business education receive careful consideration. The attendance 
the second year doubled the first, and this is ample proof of the popularity of 
the institution and its excellent corps of instructors. 

Air. Peterson married, October 10, 1901, Evalyn Johnson, daughter of 





,i/V4A^J>iAUAA/U^ , 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 165 

W. L. and Catherine (Hysong) Johnson, of Lycippus, Westmoreland county, 
and two children are the issue : Esther and William. The family are members 
of the Reformed church, in which body Mr. Peterson is deacon and superin- 
tendent of the Sabbath school connected therewith. 

JAMES E. NEWINGHAM, proprietor of the Newingham livery and 
sales stables, at Scottdale, Pennsylvania, and one of the leading and substantial 
business men of that progressive town, was born in Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, September 7, 1863, the son of Henry S. and Rose Ann (Byerly) New- 
ingham, both residents of Pleasant Unity, Westmoreland county, Pemisylvania. 
He is the grandson of David Newingham, ex-sheriil of Westmoreland county. 

James E. Newingham was but a small child when his parents took up their 
abode in Pleasant Unity. There he was educated in the public schools, and 
when a lad of fifteen years learned the trade of saddle and harness making, in 
which he became very proficient. He worked at his trade for eight years, and 
then removed to Latrobe, Pennsylvania, where he was for two years in the 
employ of the firm of I. D. Pores & Company, in the hardware and grocery 
business. His next removal was to Scottdale, where he and his father estab- 
lished themselves in the livery business in the spring of 1887, succeeding Mr. 
\Mlliam Herbert in the business. After three or four years Mr. Newingham 
succeeded to the entire business, which he has since conductd with the most 
gratifying success. This is one of the leading establishments of its kind in 
Scottdale, and }*Ir. Newingham carries a full line of driving and saddle horses, 
besides all kinds of hacks, carriages, etc. He is a live, energetic business man, 
and is to be congratulated on his well-deserved success. He also conducts an 
extensive business in buying, selling and shipping horses to the eastern mar- 
kets. He is a patriotic, public-spirited man, and is interested in all enterprises 
for the public good. He is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks. No. 777. 

February 14, 1895, he was united in marriage to Mary Emma Ogle, daugh- 
ter of William D. Ogle, of Fayette county. Pennsylvania. The following named 
children were the issue of this union: Frank Ellsworth, Ralph H., Nellie B. 
Air. Newingham and his family are members of the German Reformed church. 
Their residence is at 124 Market street, Scottdale. 

LAWRENCE WINSHEIMER. Michael Winsheimer, founder of 
the family in America, after locating at Greensburg remained only 
a few years, when he removed to Indiana county, where he bought 
one hundred acres of w-oodland at two dollars per acre from the Holland Land 
Company, and on this tract he "settled," as one of the pioneers of that section. 
The tract was part of the primeval forest, abounding in immense timbers of 
various species, and inhabited by bears, deer and other wild animals of the 
larger type. He lived to be eighty-seven years old, while his wife died at the 
age of ninety years. Their remains are interred at the Five Point school house, 
north of the town of Indiana. He was the father of five children : Lawrence, 
George, Margaret, married John Smith ; Mary, married Augustus Vogle ; and 
Michael, Jr. 

Lawrence Winsheimer was born June i, 18 17, near Nuremberg, Germany, 
and landed in America with his parents, Michael and Elizabeth (Karline) 
\\'insheimer, December 30. 1837. The family located at Greensburg, West- 
moreland county. Pennsylvania, where Lawrence continued to reside for a 
priod of sixty-eight years, or until his death, which occurred October 28. 1905. 
his age being eighty-eight years, four months and twenty-seven days. He was 



i66 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

always actively identified with the interests and progress of the town, lie was a 
tailor by trade, and for over forty years was engaged in the clothing business. 
In politics he was a loyal Democrat, and never failed to attend the polls and 
cast his vote. He was honored by his party with election to the office of cor- 
oner of Westmoreland county for three successive terms, and on one of these 
occasions received the largest majority, over five thousand, ever given a Demo- 
crat in this county During his incumbency as coroner he officiated tempor- 
arily as sherifif, because of the technical disqualification of that official. He was 
mayor of Greensburg in 1872, and also served on the town council at other 
times. He was constable for several terms, and precinct register of the Second 
ward for the ten years preceding his demise, his successive elections being made 
almost unanimous because of his great popularity. He was an intelligent, ex- 
emplary, upright citizen; a lifelong and consistent memlier of the h'irst Lu- 
theran Church, and for many years an officer in the congregation. He enjoyed 
the fullest measure of esteem and confidence of all who knew him, and left an 
honorable and untarnished name as the richest eulogy to an exemplary and 
blameless life. 

Lawrence W'inslu-imcr married, I'ebruary 15, 1845, Anna Margaret Zeise, 
which imion continued for fifty-seven years, or until her death, which occurred 
January 18, 1903. She was a daughter of hVederick and i'.lizabcth Zeise, who 
came from Germany to America when she was an infant and also located m the 
vicinity of Greensburg. Their marriage was s'^mething out of the ordinary. 
The nuptials were performed by the Rev. M. J. Steck, and two other couples 
were married by the same ceremony, viz. : Augustus Vogle to Mary Wins- 
heimer and Augustus Grafif to Louisa Smith. Of the seven persons connected 
with this triple weddings Mr. \\'insheimcr was the final survivor. Lawrence 
W'insheimer was the father of six children: i. George Stineman. auctioneer, 
living in Greensburg, born July 21, 1847; married Priscilla Blose Murray; 
father of four children: Eva Gertrude, married George Mendell, of Wheeling, 
West \'irgania : Etta Rebecca, George Hufif, mining engineer, and Archie 
Stewart, died at the age of three and one-half years. 2. Dr. William Jack, den- 
tist, lives at Parker's Landing, Pennsylvania, born March 29, 1849 ; married 
Jennie C. Agnew. 3. Mary Elizabeth, born August 26, 185 1 ; married James 
.Filmore Steele: living in Greensburg. 4. Harriet Lucetta, born June 28, 1853; 
married John B. McQuade, living in Greensburg, and mother of two children — 
Catherine and Lawrence. 5. Thompson R., of whom later. 6. Dr. Edward 
Lawrence, born November 20, i860, dentist, living at Parker's Landing, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Thomp.son Rich.\rd WixsiiEiMER, horn November 30, 1856, educated in 
the common schools of Greensburg. He began active life by working- on the 
construction of the Southwest railway from (jreensburg to Connellsville. He 
learned the printing trade in the office of The Westmoreland Democrat, and 
November 23, 1882, with his cousin, Benjamin Franklin Vogle, bought that 
newspaper plant, in which business he has since been continuously engaged. He 
has been content to follow the pursuits of the editor of a weekly newspaper in 
a country town, doing his duty fearlessly in the discussion of public measures 
and political conditions from an absolutely conscientious standpoint. Knowing 
only the honest principles of Democracy, as established by the founders of the 
party, he has always been aggressive in striking at and exposing political crook- 
edness within the party, and to his persistent efiforts, perhaps more than any 
other man, after a fierce and prolonged battle, in 1903-4, in which friendships 
of a lifetime were canceled, were the vampires which hung at the throat of the 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. ' 167 

\\'estnioreland county Democracy shaken off. As a man of keen perception in 
the newspaper field and as to his capabiHtiesin discovering and handhng live 
subjects, he has full recognition with the profession and reading public. He is 
also the business man of 77k' Democrat and has brought to that paper a line of 
patronage that keeps the plant in a healthy condition. The newspaper busi- 
ness is ills life work, although as a side line or diversion he has contributed tf- 
the world something of poetry, music and history, not of the classical order, but 
in the lines of sweetness and simplicity that appeal to the heart as well as to the 
mind. Like the ordinary political journalist he has participated in the elevation 
of local great men to positions of honor, trust and profit, and has subsequently 
shared in the fate so common to newspaper men of forgetfulness and ingrati- 
tude. He has contributed of his energies to the development and progress of 
the community, while others, perhaps, reaped the ultimate benefits without a 
thought of his labors ; he has advocated morality in society, cleanness in politics 
and public affairs, advancement and expansion of the local business world, and 
felt gratified and satisfied when success resulted in any of those directions. Mr. 
Winsheimer married, April 7, 1881, Lydia Melissa Widaman. daughter of the 
late John iMichael and Catherine Miller Widaman, of New Stanton, and later of 
Irwin. 

WILLIAM FERGUSON, member of the firm of Owens & Fergu- 
son, furnitttre dealers and undertakers, of Scottdale, Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, was born in Ayershire, Scotland, October 29, 1869, the son of 
John and Sarah (Bell) Ferguson. 

John Ferguson and his family emigrated to this country from Scotland in 
1882. He came here for the purpose of assuming charge of some furnaces in 
the vicinity of Pittsburg, but the methods employed in such business here were 
so vastly different to those he was accustomed to in his native land that he soon 
gave up the proposition and removed to East Huntingdon township, near Scott- 
dale. where he purchased a small place. Mr. Ferguson was a devoted member 
of the Presbyterian church until his removal to East Huntingdon, after which 
he affiliated with the L'nited Brethren church. His wife was Sarah Bell, and 
their children were : Anna J., deceased ; Benjamin, a mechanic of Dayton, Ohio ; 
he was oneof the first to introduce the Encaustic tile in America; Thomas, a 
marine engineer of New York city ; William, deceased ; Sarah H., wife of Sam- 
uel Campbell, of Greensburg; \\'illiam, deceased: John, deceased: William, 
mentioned hereafter : Ruth, widow of Joseph Graham, of Latrobe, Pennsyl- 
vania : Robert, deceased : and Frances Ellen, deceased. The death of John Fer- 
guson occurred in February, 1899. 

William Ferguson, eighth child of John and Sarah (Bell) Ferguson, ob- 
tained his education in the public schools, first at Hurst and later at Eversam 
school house. At "the age of thii-teen he left school and removed to Cleveland; 
Ohio, where he was for three years in the employ of his brother. He then re- 
turned to the old homestead near Scottdale, and found employment with the Mc- 
Clure Coke Company, being in the emplov of this firm for three years. He then 
established himself with J. W. Ruth & Company in the planing mill business, 
and after several years thus occupied, in company with Mr. D. N. Carroll, es- 
tablished the Scottdale planing mill, conducting the business under the firm 
name of Carroll, Ferguson & Company, and achieved considerable success. 
This arrangement existed for three years, when Mr. Ferguson sold his interest 
in the planing mill. He then studied embalming in the Barns School of Em- 
balming, Chicago, Illinois, of which institution he is a graduate. In 1900 he 



l68 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



formed a partnership with ^Ir. James Owens, and in August of that year they 
entered into their present furniture and undertaking business at 326 Pittsburg 
street, Scottdale. Both of these gentlemen are enterprising, progressive men, 
and they conduct a very successful business, carrying a full line of furniture, 
linoleum, carpet, wall-paper, etc., the embalming department being presided 
over by the proprietors, who are both capable embalmers. They occupy a 
building twenty by one hundred feet, two floors, with a wareroom sixty-four by 
one hundred feet. The business is constantly increasing, owing to the honest 
and exact business methods employed. Mr. Ferguson holds membership in the 
I. O. O. F., Scottdale Lodge, No. 885, and the White Star Encampment. He 
represented his lodge at a meeting in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. He is also 
a member of the O. of A., Scottdale Council, No. 24, of which he was president 
in 1903 ; and member and ex-treasurer of B. P. O. E., Scottdale Lodge, No. 
■/jy. Mr. Ferguson married, September 11, 1890, Sallie O. Mumaw, daughter 
of George and Lizzie Mumaw, of East Huntingdon township. Their children 
were Maud Ruth, George Mumaw, John Mumaw. Mr. Ferguson and his fam- 
ily are members of the United Brethren church, and have their residence at 302 
Laucks avenue, Scottdale. 

I 

JAMES P. OWENS, one of the progressive business men of Scott- 
dale, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, was born in Bedford county, Penn- 
sylvania, March 19, 1855, a son of Jonathan and Sarah A. (Donohoe) Owens, 
both natives of Bedford county, and grandson of William Owens, who was also 
a native of Bedford county, Pennsylvania, where his entire life was spent ; 'he 
engaged in agricultural pursuits and was an excellent farmer. His wife was 
Elizabeth McVicker, and they reared a family of eleven children, eight sons and 
tliree daughters, all of whom removed to the west. James Donohoe, the ma- 
ternal grandfather of James P. Owens, was a native of Ireland, who emigrated 
to the L^nited States, locating in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, and engaged 
for many years in the conduct of a tannery. 

Jonathan Owens, son of William Owens, and father of James P. Owens, 
was a wagon and carriage manufacturer at Centerville, Bedford county, a bus- 
iness which he conducted successfully for many vears. Politically he was a 
sound Democrat, and a public-spirited, exemplary citizen. In church relations 
he affiliated with the Roman Catholic faith. He married Sarah A. Donohoe, and 
the following named children were born to them : IMary J., wife of W. J. Miller, 
of Scottdale; Alexander, deceased: Elizabeth A., James P., mentioned here- 
after : Margaret F., wife of Martin Ames, of Scottdale : William T., deceased ; 
Ella K., deceased: and Emily, deceased. The death of Jonathan Owens oc- 
curred in 1866, and in his demise the community lost a useful, industrious citi- 
zen. His wife passed away in 1874, in Cumberland, Maryland. 

James P. Owens was reared in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, and received 
his educational training in the common schools of that county. He worked the 
home farm for his mother until he attained his majority, when he became a 
worker in the iron industry, being variously employed as a puddler. In 1880 
he removed to Scottdale, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and in 1886 was 
?ppointed by President Cleveland postmaster at Scottdale, taking charge of the 
office on September i of that year. He was thus engaged for four vears, dis- 
charging his duties with great credit to himself and to the satisfaction of the 
community. In 1890 he engaged in the livery business and stock dealing, and 
three vears later was appointed United .States revenue ganger of the Twentv- 
third Pennsylvania district, which position he resigned in 1898. He took a 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 169 

course in embalming in the Pennsylvania College of Embalming, and entered 
into the liverv and undertaking business. In August, 1900, he entered into part- 
nership with' \\'illiani Ferguson, and together they formed their furniture and 
undertaking business, which they have since conducted with the most gratify- 
ing success. 

Mr. Owens is a prominent active worker in the ncmocratic party, and has 
held various elective offices in his borough, among them being that of chief 
burgess, to which he was elected in the sparing of 1900. He has also served as 
member of the borough council, and for years has been a member of the Denio- 
cratic county committee. He holds membership in the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks, Xo. "y. Scottdale Lodge, of which he was the first exalted ruler 
and is the present treasurer. He is a member of the St. John the Baptist's 
Catholic church. In 18S0 Mr. Owens was married to Eva. daughter of Casper 
Gloss of Cumberland. Maryland. Her death occurred in 1897. They were the 
parents of the following named children: J. Raymond, a plumber at Elkins, 
West Virginia: Lulu ^L. Maud A., Ralph f., Joseph V., and Clarence E. 

THEODORE C. KENNEY, a prominent factor in the business cir- 
cles of Scottdale. Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and a man who has veiy 
materiallv assisted in the upbuilding and advancement of the town, is the son 
of John A\'. and Catherine (Keller) Kenney, both natives of Berks county, 
Pennsylvania, and of Irish origin. The progenitor of the Kenney family in 
America was the great-grandfather of Theodore C, who emigrated to the 
United States from Ireland, accompanied by his wife and family, locating in 
Berks county, Pennsylvania, in a very early day of its settling. Among his 
children was a son named Thomas. 

Thomas Kenney. grandfather of Theodore C. Kenney, was but five years 
of age when he came with his parents to this country, and his entire life was 
spent in Berks county. In 1797 he married Rebecca Mc^lichael, and reared a 
family of seven children, namely : Robinson, William, John \V., Sariah, Lu- 
cinda, ^larg-aret and Patty .\nn. 

John \V. Kenney. third son of Thomas and Rebecca (McMichael) Kenney. 
was born July 5, 1817, in Berks county. He was by trade a mining engineer, 
which occupation he followed all his active business life, and in which he was 
verv proficient : he also owned and cultivated a farm. Mr. Kenney was a pub- 
lic-spirited man, interested in all local afifairs, and served his township as school 
director, besides holding various other local offices, and was a member of the 
F. and A. M. He was a member of the IMethodist Episcopal church, and an 
earnest and efficient church work. Mr. Kennev married Catherine Keller, who 
Avas of German origin, the daughter of Jacob Keller, a farmer of Berks county, 
Pennsylvania. Their children were: Jacob Franklin, deceased: William Rob- 
inson, deceased: Theodore C. mentioned hereafter: Elizabeth Ellen, deceased; 
Thomas Jefferson, now a resident of Pottstown, Pennsylvania, where he is 
employed as a mill worker : Clara, wife of Michael Bannon, and they live in 
Geigertown. Berks countv, Pennsylvania: Aarona P., deceased: John Wayne, 
a farmer of Pottstown : Webster, of Reading, a conductor on the Philadelphia 
and Rearling railroad: and Lucinda, wife af .\dam Styre, a farmer of Chester 
county. Pennsxlvania. Tlie death of Jolin W. Kenney occurred in 1898. at the 
advanced age of ei<'hty-one vears, and his wife passed away in 1805. 

Theodore C. Kenney, third son of John W. and Catherine (Keller) Ken- 
ney. was born in Carnarvon township, Berks county, Pennsylvania, and there 
received his intellectual traim'ng in the common schools. He learned engineer- 



lyo HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

ing with his father, and receiving an advantageous offer from a Mr. Richards, 
builder of blast furnaces, accompanied him to southern Illinois and worked for 
some tmie as time-keeper. His diligent, conscientious work soon won for him 
a promotion to foreman on the construction of a large furnace. He retained 
this position for eighteen months, and then went into the machinerv depart- 
ment, where he assumed charge of the blast engine and pumps, remaining there 
for four and a half years. He then removed to Pittsburg, where he was em- 
ployed as engineer in the firm of Laughlin & Company, running their blast en- 
gine for nearly two years. His next removal was to Scottdale, October, 1872, 
and there he identified himself with the "Charlotte Furnace Company," having 
charge of the blast engine and machinery of their furnace. In 1880 he re- 
ceived an excellent offer from an Ohio furnace company in Steubenville, and 
going there assumed charge of a blast furnace, remaining there but five 
months Mr. Kenney then decided to go into business for himself, and believ- 
ing Scottdale to be a good field, removed to that place and formed a partner- 
ship with J. D. Hill. They engaged in the foundry and machine shop business 
under the firm name of Hill & Kenney. In August of 1880 they purchased land 
on which to erect their foundry and the machine shop of Everson, Macrum & 
Company. The firm made a specialty of coke manufacturers' supplies, and 
carried a full line of brass and iron fittings, brass castings and machinery sup- 
plies. Thev conducted a very successful business, and the goods that left their 
shop won a reputation for reliability and quality. They employed twenty men 
and transacted a business of $40,000 a year. This arrangement existed until 
1884. when Mr. Hill retired from the business and Mr. A. K. Stauffer became 
his successor, the firm name changing to Kenney & Company. The works 
have since been enlarged, new departments have been added, and the manu- 
facture of stationary steam has been added to their business. ' The firm of Ken- 
ney & Company existed until December, 1901, when it was merged into a cor- 
poration of the same name, capitalized at $125,000. This was effected after the 
shops- were destroyed by fire, October 11, 1901, which was almost a complete 
loss. The business had rapidly increased, the transactions amounting to $125,- 
000 per year. The former officers of the new corporation were: A. K. Stauffer, 
president : E. L. Rutherford, vice-president and secretary ; Walter L. Stauffer, 
treasurer ; and T. C. Kenney, general manager. The board of directors were : 
A. K. Stauffer, E. L. Rutherford, T. C. Kennev. E. A. Humphries, Worth Kill- 
patrick. Robert Skemp, B. F. Stauft, John Dick, J. R. Smith, B. F. Overholt, 
M. J. Kennedy, J. S. Parker, Martin Loucks. The present officers of the cor- 
poration are : B. F. Overholt, president : A. K. Stauffer, vice-president ; E. L. 
Rutherford, secretary ; and Walter F. Stauffer, treasurer. The present board 
of directors are: B. F. Overholt, A. K. Stauffer, E. L. Rutherford, E. A. Hum- 
phries, J. A. Armstrong, M. J. Kennedy, J. S. Parker, Martin Loucks and 
Walter F. Stauffer. 

In 1904 Mr. Kenne}' resigned his position as general manager, and in No- 
vember of the same year accepted a position with the Vulcan Iron Works, man- 
ufacturers of hoisting and haulage engines and general mining machinery, of 
Wilkes-Barre. He covers territory west of the Allegheny mountains. Prompt, 
reliable and energetic, ]\Ir. Kenney has rendered the most valuable services 
to the last named firm, and also represents the Pennsylvania Boiler Works, 
manufacturers of all types of boilers, tanks and general plate steel work, Erie 
Pennsylvania. His entire business career has been successful, due in a great 
part to his upright, honorable business methods and unimpeachable integrity. 
Politically he is a sound Republican. He is a member of Marion Lodge, No. 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTY. 171 

^02. Y . and A. M. : Urania Ro_\al Arch Chapter. X'n. u;-'. of Grecnsbnrg. Kcd- 
ro:i Comnianderv, K. T.. Xo. 18. of Greensburg. 

^Ir. Kenny married, April 28, 1874, Emma J. Cant, of Pittsburg, a daugh- 
ter of Joseph Gant. Their children were: i. Joseph C., a machinical engineer, 
for six vears served as superintendent of his father's works ; he is a Republican 
in politics, and was for three years a memlicr of the borough council of Scott- 
dale: he married Jane Stillwoggan. and they have one child. Emma J. 2. John 
F., in the emplov of the A\'estinghouse Machine Company, having charge of 
one of the order departments : he served for over two years in the Spanish- 
American war, a member of the Tenth Pennsylvania Regiment. 3. William 
M., a machinist in the employ of the United States Steel Company of Pitts- 
burg. 4. Charles Morgan, also a machinist with the United States Steel Com- 
pany. 5. Janet M. Mr. Kenney and his family are members of the Presbyterian 
church. 

JOHX F. EICHER was born July 12. 1868. Pie attended the public 
schools until he was about fifteen years old, and then took a position as a 
daubler and motcher in the sheet mills in Scottdale-, remaining there for two 
vears. He tlien learned the trade of" carpentering with his father and continued 
at that for about five years. In 1888 he went to Greensburg and -spent one vear 
there as a journeyman carpenter, thence to Jeannette, remaining there four 
years as journeyman. He then returned to Scottdale and worked as a jour- 
neyman there for a short time, then formed a partnership with his brother, 
L. R. Eicher, and did contracting and building under the firm title of Eicher 
Bros. This name existed for five years and nine months, at the expiration of 
which time L. R. Eicher returned to journeyman work and John F. continued 
contracting and building alone. To-day he is the leading contractor in Scott- 
dale and furnishes employment to some forty men, his operations extending 
through Fayette and Westmoreland counties. He has been awarded many of 
the largest contracts in that portion of the state, among them being : the public 
school building at Alverton ; the municipal building at Scottdale ; the Fairchance 
public school building, and numerous others of less importance. He also does 
considerable private building and selling on his own account. In 1902 the, 
Broadway Planing Mill Company was formed, l\Ir. Eicher being one of the 
promoters and half owner of the concern ; they do a general planing mill busi- 
ness, with lumber yards, etc. He established the shoe business at 106 Pitts- 
burg street in company with W. H. Niswanger, where they have a large trade, 
the firm title being Niswanger and Eicher. He is a stockholder in the Scott- 
dale Savings and Trust Company, the Broadway National Bank, and is one of 
the promoters and a stockholder in the Braddock Trust Company, formerly 
known as the People's Trust Company, of Braddock. He also has interests in 
\he Scottdale Foundry and Machine Company, whose plant he erected. In local 
aft'airs he is ever glad to further the interests of the community, and has served 
on the borough council for three years, officiating as chairman for one year. 
His politics are Republican. He is a member of the A. I. O. K. M. of Scott- 
dale. 

Mr. Eicher married. July 2, T887, C. Belle Ridenour. daughter of George 
W. and PriscilJa (liooher) Ridenour, of East Huntingdon township, West- 
moreland county. They have two children, Bessie M. and \'. Elizabeth Eicher, 
living, and one, Frank A., who died at the age of eleven. They attend the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 



172 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTY. 

LEWIS R. EICHER, contractor and Iniilder of Scottdale, was born 
November 23, 1859. -He attended the public schools of his native place, then 
took a course of bookkeeping and read medicine at the State Normal school at 
Valparaiso, Indiana, during- the winter of 1880-81. In the spring of 1881 he 
returned to Scottdale and took up the trade of carpentering with his father. 
He continued at that for two years, and then entered the sheet mill, beginning 
at the bottom and working up through all the grades to that of roller. At the 
end of four years his health failed, so he returned to the carpenter business, 
working as a journeyman in Jeannette and Scottdale. In 1894 he and his 
bi'other, John F. Eicher, formed a partnership as contractors and builders under 
the firm title of Eicher Bros., which firm existed for a period of five years and 
nine months. Lewis R. Eicher then withdrew and engaged in contracting and 
building on his own account, then entered the employ of J. W. Ruth as outside 
foro'nan, and during a period of two years erected the First National Bank, the 
Savings and Trust Company's building and the private residences of ^Messrs. 
Hill, Keister and Jarritt. In 1902 he again went into contracting on his own 
account, since which time he has erected the J. S. Parker block, the Overholt 
flats, the dwelling of George Warner, the dwelling of Martin King, at New 
Haven, Pennsylvania, and many others. He confines his operations mainly to 
Scottdale and vicinity, and has as many as fifteen people in his employ. Mr. 
Eicher is a stockholder in some of the largest and most important enterprises 
of Scottdale, and is a member of the borough council. He is a charter member 
of the A. I. O. K. M., No. 342, Arpad Lodge, of Scottdale. 

Mr. Eicher married, October 20, 1881, Cynthia M. Graft, daughter of 
Jacob L. and Harriet Graft. Their children are : Charles F., Ruby, Florence. 
Herman R., Harrison C, Leroy, Ethel May, William, Alfa, and Ralph G.. who 
died In infancy. They are members of the Presbyterian church. 

JAMES H. POOL, of Scottdale, Pennsylvania, general manager of 
the Broadway Planing Mill Company, is a native of Hempfield township, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, born November 26. 1854. He is a son of Sam- 
uel and Sophia (Bierer) Pool, and grandson of Zachariah Pool and John 
Bierer. Zachariah Pool (paternal grandfather) was a native of eastern Penn- 
sylvania, but in his younger days crossed the mountains and located in West- 
moreland county, where he devoted his attention entirely to agricultural pur- 
suits until his death in 1881, at the advanced age of ninety-eight years. John 
Bierer (maternal grandfather) was a native of Germany, from whence he came 
to America, locating in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, being one of the 
earliest settlers in the vicinity of Greensburg. His death occurred in 1849, he 
having attained a ripe old age. Samuel Pool (father) was a native of West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, where he successfully conducted extensive 
farming operations, from which he derived a comfortable livelihood and a fair 
competence for his declining years. He was a member of the English Lutheran 
church, and a worthy citizen of the community in which he resided. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Sophia Bierer, died in 1887. and he then made his 
home with his son, Zachariah T. Pool, at Greensburg. 

James H. Pool was reared on his father's farm, and his boyhood was spent 
in attending school in the winter and assisting with the varied duties of the farm 
during the remainder of the year. When seventeen years of age he left his 
home and went to Greensburg in order to learn the trade of carpenter, and for 
five years thereafter worked at the same, having located at Manor station 
some eight miles from the county seat. In the fall of 1879 he took up his resi- 



■ HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 173 

deuce in Scottdale and formed a partnership with Samuel J. Zearlev. the tirm 
name being Zearley & Pool. They engaged in the planing mill business, and in 
their extensive mill and factory, which were brick buildings, et|uipped with the 
finest and most improved modern machinery, and operated by a large force of 
skilled mechanics, they manufactured doors, sash, blinds, frames, floors, siding, 
etc. In 1894 Air. Pool purchased the interest of his partner and operated the 
plant alone for two years, at the expiration of which time he disposed of the 
business to Corral Brothers. In 1897 he accepted the office of general man- 
ager of the Broadway Planing Mill Company, in which capacity he is serving at 
the present time (.1905). Mr. Pool is one of the most enterprising citizens of 
Scottdale, bears a full share in the promotion of community interests, and has 
won for himself an exceptional record for strictest integrity and uprightness. 
Me is a member and trustee of the Presbyterian church of Scottdale, and holds 
membership in the Royal Arcanum and the Protected Home Circle. Mr. Pool 
was married September 24, 1885. to Ellen Rainer, daughter of A. L. Rainer, of 
Scottdale, and two children have been born to them, Edna B. and Gertrude R. 
Pool. ]Mrs. Pool, the mother of these children, died November 22, 1895. 

ELMER WELSH, a representative citizen of Ruffsdale, where he is 
serving at the present time (1905) in the capacity of justice of the peace, is a 
lineal descendant of John Welsh, a native of }^Iaryland, from whence he mi- 
grated to the state of Pennsylvania, settling in Beaver county about the year 
1790. where he took up land, followed farming and was also the proprietor of a 
hotel. In May, 1905, he built a new store room and business block on the 
main business street of Ruffsdale, with residence and banquet hall in connec- 
tion, and does a general merchandise business, dealing in dry goods, notions, 
hardware, groceries, furniture, in fact everything to be found in a first class 
general merchandise store, and has built up a good business. He was a lieu- 
tenant in the Revolutionary war, and during one of the battles in which he 
participated lost one of his legs, thus incapacitating him for further active 
service. He was the fatehr of two sons : John and William Welsh. 

William Welsh, son of John Welsh, was born, lived and died in Beaver 
county, Pennsylvania, where he followed farming and contracting, furnishing 
the stone for the Erie canal. His life was a useful and honorable one, and in all 
the relations of his career he displayed the utmost integrity. He married Beu- 
lah C. Cooper, whose father was a doctor of some note. He practiced his pro- 
fession in Bedford county, where he also conducted a hotel for a number of 
years. Their children we're : Seth McClure, of whom later ; James ; Mary, mar- 
ried Samuel Barnes ; Annie, married Anthony Douhett ; Beulah, married Sam- 
uel McClure; George B. : Sidney: Benjamin F., deceased. 

Seth McClure Welsh, eldest son of William and Bcnlah C. (Cooper) 
\\'elsh, was born A. D.. 1819, in Beaver county, Pennsylvania. He was a 
farmer and a rural coal operator, which lines of work he followed successfully 
for a number of years in his native county. .Accomjjanied by his family, in 
1878, he went to Kansas, where his death occurred in 1879. He was also a 
local preacher in the Methodist Episcopal church, and his influence for good 
was largely felt in the community. He married Sarah Ann Ilannum. daughter 
of John and Margaret Hannum. and their children were: Philip, a farmer of 
Kansas: Artcmus. a resident of Kansas: :\Iary J., wife of Abram Simberly : 
Anna M., wife of Henry Siebkey : Charles, died in childhood: Elmer, of whom 
later: Emma E., wife of William Shanafelt. of Portland. Oregon. 

Elmer Welsh, youngest son of Seth IMcClure and Sarah Ann (Ilannum) 



174 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

Welsh, was born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, March 2, 1S64. He was ed- 
ucated in the common schools and the State Normal School of Illinois, and 
when fourteen years of age accompanied his parents to Kansas. In that state 
he engaged in farming, was night machine maii two years for the Consolidated 
Barbed Wire Manufacturing Company, and for a period of one year followed 
the building of bridge abutments. He returned to Pennsylvaiiia, in 1886, set- 
tling in Westmoreland county, where he was engaged mostly in farming until 
April, 1904, since which time he has been engaged in the coal business, buy- 
ing and selling coal lands in Washington and \\ estmoreland counties. He is 
a member of the Episcopal church of Scottdale, and of the Grand Fraternity, 
Lodge Xo. 8, Ruffsdale, in which he passed several chairs. He is a staunch 
Republican in politics, and exerts his influence in behalf of the party whose 
principles he advocates. He has held several township offices, and is serving 
as justice of the peace, having been elected to that office in February, 1905. 
Mr. Welsh married Annie Porter, daughter of W. Newton and Mary Porter. 
Their children are: Mary A., born May 26, 1888, a graduate of Scottdale high 
school, class of 1905; Florence A., born June 28, 1890; Emma K., born De- 
cember 24, 1892; Nelson P. and Nellie I., twins, born September 18, 1895; 
Elizabeth C, born August 16, 1897; W. Newton, born April 12, 1903; and 
Elmer Edward, born October i, 1905. 

FREDERICK L. KECK, the genial and poinilar proprietor of the 
Hotel Albion, at Rufifsdale, Pennsylvania, is a son of Christian Keck, who emi- 
grated from Germany about 1865 and settled at New Stanton, Pennsylvania, 
where he followed the boiling of salt for a livelihood for a period of almost five 
years. He then located in the town of Morgan, remaining for about seven 
years, during which time he was engaged at general work. Later he moved 
to Scottdale where he engaged in the mercantile business for three years, after 
which he changed his place of residence to Everson, Fayette county, where 
for a period of about eight years he engaged in mercantile pursuits and the 
management of a hotel, both of which enterprises proved financially success- 
ful. He married, , October 16. 1866, Anna Hunker, daughter of John G. and 
Ossilla (Hough) Hunker, and their children were: Anna N., unmarried, re- 
sides at home; Martin Christian; Frederick L., of whom later. 

Frederick L. Keck was born in Fayette county, Pennsvlvania, Jami^irv 8. 
1878. His preliminary education was obtained in the public schools adjacent 
to his home, and later he pursued advanced studies at the Greensburg Sem- 
inary. Lipon attaining the age of twenty-one he engaged in the hotel business 
in Ruffsdale, Westmoreland county, and for three years successfully managed 
the old Ruffsdale Hotel which was largely patronized. In 1902 he built the 
hotel which he now occupies, known as the Albion, which has accommodations 
for sixty guests, is equipped with all modern improvements which adds to the 
comforts and pleasure of his guests, is noted for its excellent cuisine, and in all 
respects ranks among the leading hotels in the county and well merits the 
patronage of the traveling public. Mr. Keck is courteous and attentive to the 
regular patrons and to the transient guests of the house alike, and is well 
adapted to the line of business he has chosen or his life work. 

HON. NEVIN A. CORT. Among the well-known members of the 
Westmoreland county bar must be numbered Hon. Nevin A. Cort, of Greens- 
burg. He was born March 20, 1867, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

He was educated at the Greensburg Seminarv. At the age of fourteen 



HISTORY OF WESTMOKELAXD COUXTV. 175 

he obtained tlie position of bookkeeper with the firm of J. Bowman & Son, with 
whom he remained two years. At the end of that time, reahzing the advantages 
to be obtained from a more extensive educational equipment than he feh hmi- 
self to be possessed of, he attended school for one year and then taught for 
two years. The two years immediately following he spent in the service of 
1. Bowman & Son, his former employers, and then entered Franklin & ^lar- 
shall College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, where he remained three years. On 
leaving that institution he began to read law with A. .M. Sloan, of Greensburg, 
and on February 25, 1893, was admitted to the bar of Westmoreland county. 
He moved to Blount Pleasant, June 5, 1893, and there entered upon the practice 
of his profession. He opened an office in Greensburg, October i, 1900, has 
remained there up to the present time, and has built up an extensive practice. 
For nine years he has held the office of solicitor for the borough of Mount 
Pleasant. He belongs to Lodge Xo. 350, I. O. O. F., the R. A., the I. O. H., 
and is one of the charter members of the B. P. O. E.. Xo. 868, all of Mount 
Pleasant. In politics he is on ardent Republican, and is \ery active in the 
councils of his party. Mr. Cort married Mary E. Laird, and their children are: 
1 Iclen L., born }ilay 9, 1895 ; Thomas L., born May 19, 1S96 ; and M. Margaret, 
born July 31, 1902. Airs. Cort is the daughter of Thomas and Margaret Laird, 
who were descendants from Scotch ancestry. Mr. Laird held the position of 
general superintendent of the Heckla Coke Company of the Connellsville coke 
region for many years. 

:\IRS. J. H. LEIGHTY, the genial proprietor of the Tarr Hotel, 
Tarr Station, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, is the daughter of Thomas 
and Harriet (Buttermore) Cunningham. 

George Buttermore. maternal grandfather, was born and reared in Fa}'- 
ette county, and was a farmer by occupation. He owned a large tract of valu- 
able, well cultivated land near Collinsville, and was a verv successful farmer. 
In religious faith he was a member of the Baptist church. He married Barbara 
Smith, and their children are : John ; Xancy, married Abram Franks ; ]\Iary, 
married a Mr. Lyon; Catherine, married George Richer: Thomas: Jackson; 
.Smith. M. D. : Maria, married Abram Franks: i\fargaret, married Harry 
Franks; Amanda, married Benjamin Baer ; and Harriet, the mother of Airs. 
Leighty. 

Tliomas and Harriet ( Buttermore) Cunningham are the parents of chil- 
dren : Charles, a well driller of Fayette county ; Jennie, deceased, married A. 
M. L'mbel ; Lillian X'., of whom later; George, a stone mason of Collinsville: 
Carrie, wife of W. A. Ganiet : Laura, married William Waite; Daisy; Richard. 
an engineer on the Baltimore and Ohio railroad ; Harry, a farmer of Fayette 
county ; Blanche, died at the age of sixteen years. 

Lillian Cunningham married, Xovember. 1881, J. H. Leighty. Their chil- 
dren were : \\'alter H. and Ralph H. Mrs. Leighty is now engaged in the con- 
duct of the Tarr Hotel, and has achieved gratifying success in this line. Her 
house compares favorably with the best equipped hotels in this section, and en- 
joys a generous patronage. 

JOHN FREEM.\X. The grandfather of Jnlin Freeman, of Li^onier 
village, was Jacob Freeman, who was a miller bv trade and lived and died in 
the Ligonier valley. He and his wife were the parents of children : John ; 
James; George, of whom later; Polly married Abraham Eicher; and Hannah, 
married John Anstraw. 



176 HISTORY Of WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

George Freeman, son of Jacob Freeman and his wife, was burn in 1S04, 
in the Ligonier valley, and learned the shoemaker's trade which he followed 
in connection with farming throughout his life. He was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. He married Katie Kriley, and their children 
were: Jacob, deceased; John, of whom later; James, a retired merchant of Mill- 
wood, Pa.; George, lives in Ligonier; Nancy, married Joseph Mathews, and 
after his death married Robert Ewing. The death of Mr. Freeman occurred 
in 1868. 

John Freeman, son of George and Katie (Kriley) Freeman, was born Jan- 
uary 26, 1832, in the Ligonier valle\-, and attended the old subscription schools. 
He remained at home, assisting his father in the labors of the farm, until he at- 
tained his majority, and then went to learn the shoemaker's trade with Henry 
Burrell. After following the trade for about three years he purchased a farm in 
Cook township on which he lived until 1866. He then bought a farm in Ligonier 
township to the cultivation of which he devoted himself assiduously until 1889, 
when he purchased a flour and feed mill at Ligonier and moved into the village. 
This mill he operated in partnership with his sons, under the firm name of John 
Freeman and Sons, until it was destroyed by fire on July 28, 1899, since which 
time he has led a retired life in Ligonier village. He belongs to the K. H., of 
Greensburg, and is a member of the Presbyterian church, of Ligonier, in which 
for seventeen years he served on the board of trustees. Mr. Freeman married 
Rebecca, daughter of James and Hannah Guffey, of Sewickley township, and 
their children were : George, an engineer at Greensburg • James, died at the age 
of twenty-one; Sarah J., died unmarried; John M., graduated from Jefferson 
College, and is an attorney in Pittsburg; and Anna Lucimla, wife of Charles B. 
Hollingsworth, of Greensburg. 

SAMUEL M. McKEL'VEY. The grandfather of Samuel M. McKel- 
vey, of Lose, was James McKelvey, born in the Ligonier valley, and was edu- 
cated for the ministry of the Presbyterian church but was never ordained. He 
spent his life in his native valley where he owned two large farms to the culti- 
cation of which lie applied himself. He married Jane Paterson, and their chil- 
dren were : Sarah, married Marshall Reed ; Agnes, married Aaron Wells ; 
Reuben McKinley, of whom later : John Jackson : James P. ; Jane, married 
Robert Adams ; and Thomas. 

Reuben McKinley McKelvey, son of James and Jane (Paterson) McKel- 
vey, was born April 18, 1822. in the Ligonier valley where he passed his life 
in agricultural pursuits. He purchased about 1850, the farm which is now the 
property of his son James. Fie was a member of the Presbyterian church, and 
a Democrat in politics. He married Jane Menoher, and their children were : 
Samuel M., of whom later ; Jannie, married B. R. Robb ; Sadie, died unmarried ; 
James, a farmer on the homestead ; Samantha : Permelia, married Josiah H. 
Brant: Catherine, married F. S. Robb; Josephine, married C. C. Brant; Agnes, 
married Jacob E. Keffer ; and Emma, married Herbert Johnson. They are all 
living m the Ligonier valley. 

Samuel M. McKelvey, son of Reuben McKinley and Jane (J\Ienoher) 
INIcKelvey, was born December 26, 1849, in Ligonier township, and received 
his education in the common schools and at the Ligonier high school. He be- 
came a farmer early in life, and continued to devote himself to the duties of a 
husbandman until 1881. In that year he established in Lose the general mer- 
cantile business which he has ever since conducted. He w^as appointed post- 
master of Lose in 1893, and held the office until it was abandoned, July i, 1905, 



HISTORY OF irESTMORELAXD COUNTY. ijj 

on account of tlie establishment of rural free delivery. He and his family are 
members of the Preslnterian church of Ligonier. I\Ir. McKelvey is a Demo- 
crat. He married Elizabeth J.. tlauKlUer oi John Johnston. By this marriage 
there were no children. Two years after the death of his wife Mr. McKelvey 
married Elizabeth, daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth Matthews, and their chil- 
dren were: Pearl C, married Robert Johnson: Ira J., died in childhood: Mary 
E., a graduate of the township schools, and has taught for two terms ; and 
Russell M., is at home. 

\MLLIAM M. CARNS. The paternal grandfather of William M. 
Cams, of Laughlinstown, was George Cams, who passed his entire life in 
Mercer county, Pennsylvania, where he was engaged in the lumber business. 
His son George was born in fiercer county, and was associated in busmess 
with his father. He also engaged in farming and contracting and helped to 
build the reservoir at South Fork, which so greatly added to the disasters 
caused by the Johnstown flood. Later he moved to Westmoreland county, 
where he en2:aged in farming near Ligonier on what was known as the "Koon 
farm." During the ^^lexican war he was proprietor of a hotel at Laughlinstown 
known as the Horse Shoe Bend Hotel. ^Ir. Cams married Rachel, daughter of 
Frederick Mathews, one of the pioneers of the Ligonier valley, and their chil- 
dren were : Gottfried : Mary, wife of Frank Shaffer; Edward, Hves in Cali- 
fornia ; Frederick and Lizzie, died in childhood ; William M., mentioned here- 
after : and Philip AI. The death of ^Ir. Cams occurred in 1849, and was the 
result of smallpox which he contracted from emigrants who were guests at his 
hotel. 

\^'illiam ^I. Cams, son of George and Rachel (Mathews) Cams, was born 
December 3, 1840, in Mercer county, and was six months old when taken to 
Westmoreland county by his parents. He was educated there in the common 
schools, and when a mere boy drove the stage from Shellsburg to Bedford and 
from Somerset to Johnstown. In 1862 he enlisted in Company K, Fifth Reg- 
iment, Pennsylvania A'olunteers, and served until the close of the war. He was 
wounded three times and was imprisoned for ninety-one days in York river 
station house and in Libby. He was honorably discharged at Cumberland, 
Maryland, April 17, 1865. After his return home he went to Venango county, 
where he worked by contract for the Empire Oil Company and others, drilling 
no fewer than twenty-seven oil wells. In 1878 he returned to the Ligonier 
valley and went into the lumber business, in which he has been continuously en- 
gaged ever since. He is a member of G, A. R., Ligonier Post. He is a Re- 
publican in politics. 

XOAH BYERS. The paternal grandfather of Noah Byers, of Rector, 
was a native of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and when a young man moved 
to Somerset county, where he passed the remainder of his life in agricultural 
labors. His children were: Jacob, mentioned hereafter: and five daughters. 

Jacob Byers was born in Somerset county, near Jenncss cross roads, where 
he spent his entire life as a farmer. He was a member of the Lutheran church 
and a Republican. His wife was Elizabeth P)cacherker, and their children were: 
D: niel. deceased ; John, deceased ; Jacob and Henry, who are fanners in Ligon- 
ier township: and Xoah, mentioned hereafter. The death of Mr. Byers, the 
father of the family, occurred in i860. Mrs. Byers, the mother, died in 1895. 

Xoah Byers, son of Jacob and Elizabetli fBcacherkcr) Byers, was born 

October 9. 1848, in Somerset countv on the home farm. He received his cdu- 
2 12 



178 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

cation in the common schools, and in early life worked as a teamster. In 1875 
he purchased the farm which is now his home and which was formerlv known 
as the "Lewis Rector farm," in the Ligonier valley. About 1897 he erected a 
fine building which he named the Alountain Home and furnished with all the 
modern improvements. Here during the summer he has as many guests as can 
be accommodated. The building is situated four miles south of Ligonier, on 
the Pittsburg, Westmoreland & Somerset Railroad, within two hundred yards 
of the Mountain Home station, and near it is one of the best flowing springs in 
the Ligonier valley. Air. Byers and his family are members of the Evangelical 
church of Rector. He believes in the principles of the Republican party, but is 
extremely independent in his voting. Mr. Byers married Susan, daughter of 
Noah and Sarah (Zimmerman) Shawley, and they had children: Palmer A., 
an engineer on the Pennsylvania Railroad at Pitcairn ; Etta, married Jacob 
Johnston, and is now deceased ; Sarah, married H. L. Phillips, of Wilkensburg, 
Pcm-.^\lvania, and has three children: Joseph Arthur and Eta Alelda (twins), 
born July 19, 1900; and Noah Howard, born July 18, 1903; Pearl, at home. 

DAVID H. STITELY, of Ligonier, was born September 30, 1858, in 
Franklin county, Pennsylvania. He was educated in the common schools, and 
in early life learned the trade of carpenter, which he followed for a few years 
in Irwin, whence he moved to East End, Pittsburg, and there for some years 
worked as a carpenter, contractor and builder. In 1898 he went to the Lig- 
onier valley and settled at Laughlinstown, where some \-ears before he had 
purchased a farm known as the "old Clark farm." In 1901 he organized a 
lumber business in Ligonier, which he has successfully continued to the jiresent 
time, furnishing finished lumber and frames to the Ligonier vallev. He is a 
member of Lodge No. 585. I. O. O. F., of Pittsburg. Air. Stitely married Alice 
K. Linthimer and they have children: David H., Louise R., Thomas.D., and 
Walter Al. 

CHARLES W. BOUCHER. The name of Boucher is undoubtedly 
of French origin, antl that branch of the family of which Charles W. Boucher, 
of New Kensington, is a member, has long been resident in Penns\ Ivania. 
Henry Boucher lived in Somerset county, where his son, Isaiah Boucher, was 
born in 1824. About 1838 Isaiah Boucher went to Garret county, Alaryland, 
where for some years he followed his trade, which was that of a tinner. During 
the latter portion of his life he was a farmer. From 1875 to 1878 he was 
county commissioner of Garret county, and in politics was a steadfast Republi- 
con. He was a member of the German Reformed church. Air. Boucher married 
Lucretia, daughter of Phineas and Adeline Compton, and granddaughter of 
Henry Compton, who was a messenger boy in the service of (General \Vashing- 
ton while in the state of New Jersey, whence the Compton family originafly 
came. Air. and Mrs. Boucher had children: Henry Stewart, a merchant in 
Glade, Pennsylvania ; Phineas Compton, lives on the old homestead in Mary- 
land ; Samuel A., a physician in Bartin, Allegheny county, Alaryland ; Charles 
W.. mentioned hereafter: Arthur AL, a farmer in Allegheny county, Alaryland; 
and two who died in infanc}-. Air. Boucher, the father, died in 1903. 

Charles W. Boucher, son of Isaiah and Lucretia (Compton) "Boucher, 
was born A'lay 19, 1865. in Grantsville, Alaryland, and in 1892 graduated from 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. He opened an office at" Bruston Alills, 
West A'irginia, Mhere he remained one year, and then moved to New Kensing- 
ton, being one of the pioneer settlers of the new borough. He there established 





ajA^*^*-^ 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 179 

liiniself as a dentist in partnership with Dr. L. H. !■' ranee, of Greensburg. At 
the end of two years he purchased his partner's interest and has since success- 
fully conducted the business alone. For three years he served as school director. 
His political principles are those advocated by the Republican party, and he 
is a member and trustee of the United Presbyterian church. Dr. Boucher mar- 
ried Jennie X.. daughter of John M. and Isabel Hill, of Freeport. Armstrong 
countv, and thev have two children: Lucretia Isabel, born ^lay, 1898; and 
Margaret Ruth, born June, 1903. 

GEORGE D. HAMOR. On the paternal side George D. Hamor. of 
New Kensington, is descended from ancestors who settled several generations 
back in the eastern part of Pennsylvania, while through his mother he comes 
of (ierman and Irish lineage. 

Allen Nathaniel Hamor was born in 1820, in Blair county, and was a mer- 
chant at Freeport, Pennsylvania. During the Civil war he served in the Union 
army. He was a Republican and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Mr. Hamor married Jane X. Sniger, born in 1818, near Saltsburg, Westmore- 
land county, and like her husband was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

George D. Hamor. son of Allen Nathaniel and Jane X. (Sniger) Hamor. 
was born January 27, 1855. at Freeport, Armstrong county, where he received 
his preparatory education in the common schools, afterward attending Mount 
Union College, Ohio. June 8. 1876. he was admitted to the bar at Butler, 
Pcnnsvlvania. In 18S8. at the time of the great fire in Du Bois, he was a resi- 
dent of that place and held the office of burgess. He affiliates with Lodge No. 
512, B. P. O. E., the Heptasophs and Maccabees, all of New Kensington, Po- 
litically he is a Republican, but has never taken a very active part in public 
affairs. Mr. Hamor married, ^lay 4. 1883, IMaggie J., daughter of Dr. ^^'iIliam 
A. Means, a prominent physician of DuBois, and they have two children : Edna, 
born ]May 3, 1884, wife of S. M. Lee, attorney at law of Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania : and William Allen, aged eighteen, student in ^^'estern University. Pitts- 
burg. 

PETER F. McC.\NN. Among the sturdy and energetic men of 
Westmoreland county who hewed their way to usefulness and distinction, 
Peter Francis McCann stands prominent. He aspired more to usefulness than 
to greatness and will leave his imprint on our rugged hills rather than to leave 
his name in the halls of dubious fame. He was born at Wellcrsburg, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania. August 12. 1857. ^'s father was killed at the Boarding 
Shaft Mines at Frostburg. T^laryland. when Peter was but a child. At the age 
of thirteen years, with only two vears schooling, he began the battle of life, 
and his inborn energy enabled him to earn a man's wages. His mother, with 
ber family, moved to Scottdale, \^'estmoreland county, in 1874. He found 
employment in the mills of the Charlotte Furnace Company. In 1876 a sad 
misfortune befell him, resulting in the loss of his right arm. He was appointed 
to a position in the revenue service in 1886 which be held for four years. In 
1892 he was nominated on the Democratic ticket for the office of sherifT. and in 
one of the most exciting contests in the historv of the county he was elected, 
being the only Democrat to cscajK- defeat. He was the last of a long continu- 
ous line of Democratic sheriffs. He took charsre of his office January 2. 1893. 
He found sufficient to test his coinage, to challenge his judgment, and employ 
bis wits. Fortunately for him and his eight score thousand constituents that 



l8o HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY 



\v. possessed in the highest degree the quahties that conquered without blood- 
shed, and paved the way for general armistry when the troubled waters sought 
their wonted rest. His jurisdiction lay within the storm centre of the great 
labor troubles that darkened the pages of our social and industrial history. He 
was confronted by one of the most serious and violent outbreaks ever wit- 
nessed in the great Connellsville coke regions. Ten thousand men participated 
in the unhappy conflict. Violence was threatened on every hand. j\len were 
frenzied in their efforts for victory. He waved aside every appeal for military 
force, and depended on the deputies he had carefully selected. Without the 
sacrifice of a single life he conquered, and received the heartfelt thanks of an 
intelligent and peace-loving constituency. This is the enduring monument he 
had builded — it is even better than he knew. 

Peter F. McCann is descended from Thomas and Maria AlcCann, both of 
whom were reared in county Longford, Ireland, but, emigrating to America, 
were married at the church, attached to Saint Vincent's Arch-Abbey, near 
Latrobe, August 5, 1852. Their children were: (i) Katherine, married James 
A. Kittl, now deceased, brother of Reverands Ferdinand and William Kittl, 
of the diocese of Pittsburg. (2) James T., unmarried, served as a director of 
the poor of Westmoreland county. (3) Peter F. (4) Mary Ellen, married P. 
C. Coyle. 

f^eter F. McCann was married to Rosalie L. Lambing, August 4, 1884, in 
the church at Kittanning. Christopher Lambing, the founder of the Lambing 
family in this country, was a son of an officer in the French army, and came 
from near Strasburg about 1740, and settled in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, 
where his tenth child, Matthew, married Magdalene Kohn, in Adams county, 
to which he had previously moved in 1798. His fifth child, Michael Anthony, 
Mrs. McCann's father, was born there October 10, 1806. The family moved to 
Long Run, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, in the fall of 1828, and to Manoi- 
ville, same county, two years later. December i, 1837, Michael Anthony Lamb- 
ing married Anne Shields, and lived in Manorville the remainder of his life, 
except from 1844 to 1856, dying December 8, 1886. 

Thomas Shields came to America from County Donegal. Ireland, about 
1745, and purchased a large farm in the northern part of Franklin county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1767 and made it his home. His son John, great-grand- 
father of Mrs. McCann, was born on the voyage to America, and about 1771 
married Mary Easby. Their oldest child, William Casper, jMrs. McCann's 
grandfather, was born in 1772. He came to near Greensburg, Westmoreland 
county, when a young man. Later he bought a farm in South Buffalo town- 
ship, Armstrong county, and May 24, 1805, married Man,- Ruffner. They 
spent the remainder of their lives on the farm. Anne, the sixth child, Mrs. 
McCann's mother, was born July 4, 1814, married December i, 1837, and died 
July, 1880. Rosalie Lambing (i\Irs. McCann") is the youngest of five boys and 
four girls, and was born in Butler county, Pennsylvania, near Sugar Creek 
Church. The family returned to Manorville, June 3. 1856. where Rosalie re- 
mained until her marriage. The following children survive Mr. and Mrs. P. F. 
McCann: Mary A.. Rosalie L., Idlefonsa, Josephine L., Peter F., Ir.. and 
Thomas. 

Reverends A. A. Lambing, of Williamsburg. Pennsylvania, and M. A. 
Lambing of Scottdale, Pennsylvania, are brothers of Mrs. McCann, and both 
are prominent in the Pittsburg diocese. The former is one of Pennsvlvania's 
most distinguished historians, and the latter is equally prominent as a leader in 
the work of the Total Abstinence Societv. 



HISTORY OF Jl-ESTMORELAXD COUXTY. iSi 



Peter F. ^IcCann engaged in 1897 in industrial prusuits. In that yeai 
he assisted in building the Old r^Ieadow Rolling Mill at Scottdale, Pennsylvania, 
for the manufacturing of sheet iron. He was manager for one year, when the 
mill was sold. In 1899 he went into the business of contracting. He has built 
railroads, trolley lines, coke plants, reservoirs, etc. He has built the new state 
road running north from Greensburg, which is the first of its kind in the 
county, one of the first in the state under the existing law. The extent of his 
operations may be best measured b>- the fact that he employs constantly over 
one thousand men. With pardonable pride he can leave to history his i)art in 
the battle of life. 

DAMD H. :\IcCARTY. The father of David H. JMcCarty, of New 
Kensington, was Hugh McCarty, who about 1845 °^ '4^ emigrated from Ban- 
bridge, countv Down, Ireland, and settled in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he 
worked at landscape gardening and other branches of horticulture. Later he 
engaged for some years in market ganlening on a tract of land which now forms 
a part of Allegheny City. In 1868 he settled on a farm situated where New 
Kensington now stands, and there continued to labor as a market gardener until 
1881, when he retired and returned to Allegheny City. In that place he held 
at one time the office of poor director. He supported the Democratic party, and 
was a member of the Roman Catholic church. Mr. McCarty married Mary 
McXalley, a native of county Armagh, Ireland, and their children were: Ed- 
ward F., lives in Allegheny City: David H., mentioned hereafter; Mary J., 
Louise E., married Edward F. Kelley, and after his death becme the wife of 
John F. Donovan : and Letitia H. There were also three who died in infancy. 
The death of Air. McCarty occurred in 1891, in Alleghenv City, where the clos- 
ing years of his life had been passed. 

David H. ]\IcCarty, son of Hu.gh and ]\Iary (McNalley) McCarty, was 
born December 12, 1852, in Pittsburg, and received his education in the com- 
mon schools of Allegheny City and Parnassus. In his youth he assisted in 
his father's business both as manager and as salesman until the year of his 
father's retirement, after which he conducted the business alone until 1891. He 
then entered the service of the Burrell Improvement Land Company as field 
salesman in the Kensington plan of lots, a position which he retained for two 
years. When the town was incorporated he was elected chief burgess for one 
year, and was re-elected the following year for a term of three years. After 
serving about two years of the second term he resigned in order to accept the 
office of postmaster to which he was appointed by President Cleveland for a 
term of three years, which he completed, and then served two years under the 
first McKinlev administration. At the end of that time he resigned and ac- 
ceited the nomination for sherifif of Westmoreland countv, Init was defeated 
by ]]. F. May. the county being largely Republican. .\t the age of twenty-one 
he was elected a member of the coimcil of Alleghcin- City, and during his term 
of office served as chairman of the board of health. For three vears he was 
poor director of Allegheny City, and in 1904 was again a candidate for the 
office of sheriflf of W'estmoreland county. He belongs to Electric Council, N. 
U.. and Lodge No. 512, B. P. O. E., of New Kensington. He and his family 
are members of St. Joseph's (Roman Catholic) church of New Kensington. 

Mr. McCarty has been twice married. His first wife was Ella, daughter of 
Simon and Hittie CLinton) Small, natives of Philadelphia. Mr. and Mrs. 
McCarty had children: Mary Hester, Agnes Ella, Hugh Simon, and George 
Linton, who died in infancv. The others are at home. The mother of these 



1 82 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

children died February 26, 1891, and IMarch 2, 1897, ]\[r. IMcCarty married 
Susan H. Small, a sister of his first wife. By this marriage he is the father of 
two sons : David H. and Charles Joseph. 

JOSEPH BULLERS. The father of Joseph BuUers, of New Ken- 
sington, was John Bullers, born in 1801, in England, and in 1842 emigrated to- 
the United States, settling in Jefiferson county. He had been a lace maufac- 
turer in the old country, but on coming to his new home engaged for the re- 
mainder of his life in farming. He was a member of the Baptist church. ]\Ir. 
Bullers married, in England, a Miss Shaw, and of their ten children six died in 
the old country. Those whom they brought with them to the United States 
were : William, Edwin, James and Ebenezer. After the death of his wife Mr. 
Bullers married Adeline Harrington, and their children were : Henry, deceased ; 
j\Iary Ann, married J. Jones, of Jefferson county, and is now deceased ; Jo- 
seph, mentioned hereafter; Elizabeth, wife of E. J. Irwin, of Jefferson county; 
Emilv. married John Campbell ; Rachel, wife of William Kirkman ; Catherine,, 
wife of W. N. Humphrey : Lucy, married William Clark ; one who died in in- 
fancy ; Thomas, deceased : Charles G., a farmer in Jefiferson county ; and Elmer, 
a farmer on the homestead. Mr. Bullers, the father, died in 1888. 

Joseph Bullers, son of John and Adeline (Harrington) Bullers, was born 
October 14, 1845, in Jefferson county, where he was educated in the common 
schools. When but sixteen years of age he engaged in the lumber business for 
himself at Brookvillc, and continued it successfully for forty years. In con- 
nection with this he labored in summer as a farmer and drover. He is the only 
man in that part of the country who deals in pine timber. In 1885 he moved 
to New Kensington, established himself in the mercantile business, and the fol- 
lowing year built a large store-house on the corner of Ninth street and Fourth 
avenue, which is one of the finest in the borough. He has there successfully 
continued the business ever since, carrying a general line of groceries and 
country produce. Since becoming a resident of the town he has built twenty 
houses. He belongs to Brookville Lodge No. 217, I. O. O. F.- In ]3olitics he is 
a Republican, and at one time was a member of the borough council. I\Ir. 
Bullers married Hannah F., daughter of James and Susan (Keys) Suffolk, the 
former English and the latter of Irish parentage. The children born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Bullers were: Arthur, died at the age of seven years; Amos, who is 
on his father's farm in .Jefferson county, married Annie Conghern, and has 
two children : Florence and Helen ; Vernie, wife of Joseph Dewitt, of New 
Kensington, and one who died in infancy. 

FRANCIS M. CURTIS, of New Kensington, is the son of Dr. 
Charles Curtis, who came from Rutland, Vermont, to Parnassus, Pennsylvania, 
where he practiced medicine for a few years, after which he moved to Colum- 
bus City, Iowa, and there engaged in the practice of his profession during the 
remainder of his life. Dr. Curtis married Martha, daughter of David McClain, 
one of the first publishers of the old Pittsburg Ga::cttc, and two children .were 
born to them : Phrelje, anrl Francis M., mentioned hereafter. Dr. Curtis died 
about 1859. 

Francis M. Curtis, son of Charles and Martha (McClain) Curtis, was born 
Mav 12, 1857, in Iowa, and was but two years old at the time of the death of 
his father. His mother then returned to her old home at Freeport, Pennsyl- 
vania, the bov receiving his education in the common schools of that place and 
of Indiana county. Afterward he attended the Elder's Ridge Academy, grad- 



THE 
NEW VORK V 
f PUBLIC LIBRARY 1 



HISTORY OF IVESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 183 

uating at the end of two years. In 1877 he became clerk for the firm of \\'ilson 
& Manifold, general merchants of Parker's Landing, Pennsylvania. In 1883 he 
was admitted to partnership, the style of the firm becoming Manifold & Curtis, 
under which name the business was conducted for the next ten years. In 1893 
he moved to New Kensington and there established a department store, which 
he has successfully conducted down to the present time under the firm name of 
Frank Curtis & Company. .Mr. Curtis was one of the ])ioneer merchants of 
New Kensington, and his business has increased until he has now the largest 
store of its kind in the Allegheny valley. He is a director of the Logan Trust 
Company, of New Kensington, and one of the trustees of the Young Men's, 
Christian Association. He is a member and trustee of the Presbyterian church 
of Xew Kensington. Mr. Curtis married Susan, daughter of Peter King, of 
Emlenton. Pennsylvania, and one child was born to them, who died in infancy. 

ALEXANDER LE.SLIE. The family of which Alexander Leslie, of 
New Kensington, is a representative first comes into notice in the person of 
Mr. Leslie who was keeper of the ferries near V'allev camp about the time 
of the building of the canal which ran through the Allegheny valley, where he 
lived and ended his days. His children were: \Mlliam, deceased; David, men- 
tiivned hereafter; James, deceased ; Cjeorge, a farmer in Lower Burrell township ; 
Tliomas, deceased ; and two daughters, one of whom was married to Thomas 
Marshall and the other to Alexander Marshall. 

David Leslie was born in 1812 or '13 near New Kensington, and passed 
his life as a farmer in Lower Burrell township. In politics he was a staunch 
Kejniblican and held the office of school director. He was a member of the 
Presbyterian church. He married I\Iary Haltz, of Alleghenv county, and their 
children were : George R.. a farmer of Lower Burrell township ; Agnes R. ; 
William H., a farmer on the homestead: James, a real estate broker in South 
Sharon : Alexander, mentioned hereafter ; and Elizabeth, wife of John Ed- 
monds, of Carleton, Missouri. The death of Mr. Leslie, the father, occurred in 
1892. 

Alexander Leslie, son of David and Mary (Haltz) Leslie, was born Oc- 
tober 25. 1859. and received his primary education in the common schools, 
from which he passed to the acdemy at Tarentum and thence to Duff's Business 
College. Pittsburg, where he graduated. For four or five >ears he was a teacher 
in his native county. About 1882 or '83 he established himself in the drug 
business at Parnassus, where he remained until 1892. He then moved to New 
Kensington, where he was one of the pioneer settlers, purchasing the second lot 
sold in the town. In that place he has ever since conducted a drug business. 
He has been elected to the office of school director. He belongs to Lodge No. 
548. F. and A. M., of \'erona, Pennsylvania, and in the sphere of politics 
adheres to the Republican party. He is a member of the Presbyterian church. 
Mr. Leslie married Ada, daughter of Peter King. 

ALBERT H. SNYDER. Jacob Snyder, great-grandfather of Albert 
li Snyder, of New Kensington, emigrated from Germany and settled in Bedford 
county. Pennsylvania, where he passed his life as a farmer. He married Mar- 
garet Helzel, and their chilflren were: Jacob; William: John, mentioned here- 
i.Uer ; Tobias : George ; Thomas ; anrl Mary, married .Alexander Davis. 

Jolm Snyder, son of Jacob and .Margaret (Helzel) Snyder, was born April 
3. 1823, in Bedford county, and in early life learned the trades of stonemason, 
bricklayer and plasterer, which he followed until 1868. He then engaged in 



i84 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

mercantile business at Reimersburg, Clarion county, continuing for twenty-two 
years and retiring in 1890. He was a member of the Reformed church. Mr. 
Snyder married Sarah J., daughter of John Fehx Keller, and their children 
were: William D., mentioned hereafter; Elliott E., Emma F., married J. J. 
Anderson ; Albert C, Annie B., wife of William H. Anderson ; David E. ; Mary 
L., married Richard B. Wick ; and two who died in infancy. The death of the 
father of the family occurred August 11, 1904. 

William D. Snyder, son of John and Sarah J. (Keller) Snyder, was born 
January i, 1851, in Clarion county, where he received his education in the com- 
mon schools and at the Clarion Collegiate Institute. In early life he assisted in 
his father's business and was freight and ticket agent for the Huntington & 
Broad Top railroad for two years. In 1892 he moved to New Kensington, 
where for three years he was engaged in the grocery business. For the last few 
years he has been in the employ of his son, A. H. Snyder, in the real estate, in- 
surance and mortgage loan business at No. 913 Fifth avenue, New Kensington, 
Pennsylvania. He was a member of the first school board of New Kensington, 
and for two terms held the office of borough clerk. He is a Republican in pol- 
itics, and belongs to the Masonic fraternity. Since the age of nineteen he has 
been a member of the Reformed church. Mr. Snyder married Anna M., 
daughter of James A. and Mary Mortimore, and their children were: Ida Flor- 
ence, died at the age of fifteen years ; Albert H., mentioned hereafter ; V'irgilia 
P., who is a stenographer and typewriter for the Pittsburg Retluction ^\'orks ; 
John Lloyd, employed as a clerk bv J. H. Eckley, of New Kensington ; and three 
who died in childhood. 

Albert H. Snyder, son of William D. and Anna M. (Mortimore) Snyder, 
was born August 9, 1876, at Reiniersburg, Clarion county, where he received 
his education in the Clarion Collegiate Institute. During his school days he 
assisted his father in the latter's business, and after comjjleting his education 
worked five years as a clerk for a real estate and insurance firm. Since March, 
1900. he has been successfully engaged for himself in the real estate, loan and 
general insurance business. He belongs to Lodge No. 512, B. P. (). E., of 
New Kensington, and in politics is a staunch Republican. He is a member 
of the Reformed church of New Kensington. Mr. Snyder married S. Bertha, 
daughter of G. W. and Elvira Stewart, of Clarion county, and they have one 
child, Eugene Clyde Stewart Snyder. 

ELMER J. BAXTER. The grandfather of Elmer J. Baxter, of Par- 
nassus, was James Baxter, who passed his entire life as a farmer in Lower Bur- 
rell township. He belonged to the Democratic partv, and was a member of the 
Presbyterian church. His children were: John, Robert. Andrew, mentioned 
hereafter ; and James. 

.Andrew Baxter, son of James Baxter, was born in \\'cstmoreland county, 
and like his father was a lifelong farmer. He was a member of the Presby- 
terian church of Parnassus. His wife was Susanna, daughter of William and 
Susanna Milligan, and their children were : William C, a farmer in Westmore- 
land county : Harriet, wife of John Culp ; Elmer J., mentioned hereafter; Nancy 
J., married Frank M. Eyler ; Newton J., a dentist in Teannette : Margaret S.. 
wife of Newton Anderson; Elizabeth L., Ida F., and Sallie AI. The death of 
Mr. Baxter occurred in 1900. 

Elmer J. Baxter, son of Andrew and Susanna (Milligan) Baxter, 
was born Sejitember 18, 1862. in P'pper Burrell township, and 
received his primary education in the common schools, from which he advanced 



HISTORY OF IVESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 185 

to Parnassus Academy and Reedsburg Normal school. After tcachinsj- lor 
three terms in his native township and for two years at Parnassus he purchased 
the shoe store of A. Cook, of that town, and for three years conducted the bus- 
iness. He then engaged in the hardware and implement business for about six 
years, the first three years under the firm name of Alter & Baxter, and the 
remainder of the time under that of Baxter & Wills. His next venture was in 
the real estate, loan and insurance business, which he has successfully conducted 
to the present time. He has recently organized, in partnership with H. H. Bax- 
ter, what is known as the New Kensington Fiber Plaster Company for the 
manufacture of wall plaster and other fire-proof products. In 1900 he was 
elected school director and in 1903 was re-elected for three years. For that 
length of time he was president of the board and is now treasurer. He has 
been chairman of the board of health for four years. In politics he is a Pro- 
hibitionist. He and his family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
of New Kensington. Mr. Baxter married Carrie, daughter of Aaron and 
Mary A. Reimer, and their children were: Lelia I., died in childhood; Lola L., 
Flora E.. and Ruth C. 

DAVID THOMAS. John and Anna Thomas were the parents of 
David Thomas, of New Kensington, who was born July 12, i860, in South 
A\'ales. and received his education in the common schools of his native country. 
After leaving school he learned the trade of a weaver. In April, 1881, he came 
to the United States and settled in Pittsburg, where for some time he followed 
liis trade. In 1884 he obtained a position with the Metropolitan Insurance Com- 
pany at Yonngstown, Ohio, where he remained two years and a half, at the 
end of that time returning to Pittsburg and resuming his trade. In 1886 he 
Tjecame proprietor of the St. David's Hotel, Pittsburg, which he successfully 
conducted for fourteen years. December 10, 1900, he purchased what was then 
known as the Hotel Will of New Kensington, of which he immediately took 
possession, changing the name to the Flotel Kensington, and has been the pro- 
prietor ever since. In 1902, in partnership with Thomas J. Thomas, he engaged 
in the business of importing cockles or shell fish from the old country and pros- 
ecuted the undertaking for two years. In February, 1904, he was elected a 
menilier of the council of New Kensington, for a term of three vears. and has 
since been largely instrumental in obtaining the new station at that place, and 
also other improvements. He is a member of Gomer Lodge, No. 64, I. O. O. F., 
Madock Lodge, No. 229, K. P.. in which he has passed all chairs and holds the 
rank of past chancellor, and Cap Sheaf Lodge. No. 159. Heptasophs, all of 
Pittsburg. He is esteemed loyal knight of Lodge No. 512, B. P. O. E. of New 
Kensington, and also belongs to the Homeless Twenty-six. In politics he is a 
staunch Republican. 

Mr. Thomas married in 1886, Elizabeth, widow of \Mlliam R. Reese, anct 
daughter of the late Thomas P.. Jones of .Mleghenv. Pennsylvania, aufl thev 
have two daughters: Sarah, graduated from Savres' Business College, of New 
Kensington, and is now stenographer for the Pittsburg works ; and Maisie, at 
home. By her former marriage ]\Irs. Thomas was the mother of the follow- 
ing children : ^^■illiam R., manager of the Hotel Kensington : Annie, at home : 
Elizabeth, at home: and John T., employed as a clerk by the L^nited States 
Steel &• Tin Plate Company. 

EUWER FAMILY. The family of which Robert Allen Euwer and 
."Krchie Nelson Euwer, of New Kensington, are representatives, was planted in 
this country bv three brothers, Patrick, Sannul and Inhn F.uwer, who cmi- 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



grated from Ireland in. 1796. I'atrick never married, Samuel settled on a farm 
at Sandy creek, Allegheny county; and left numerous descendants, and John 
was the founder of the Westmoreland county branch of the family. 

John Euwer was born about 1767, in Ireland, and on coming to this coun- 
try settled in Plum township, Allegheny county, where he purchased some two 
hundred and seventy acres of land and engaged in farming during the remain- 
der of his life. He was a member of the Reformed Presbyterian church. Mr. 
Euwer married Nancy McMillen, of the Ligonier valley, and their children 
were: Jennie, wife of James McMath. farmer of Penn township, Allegheny 
countv : Archibald, mentioned hereafter ; Daniel, merchant of Blairsville and 
later of Pittsburg; Nancy, wife of Robert Euwer; Mary, wife of Thompson 
Graham, of Freeport, Pennsylvania; John Nelson, merchant; Eliza, wife of 
Robert Shearer ; Samuel, merchant of Newcastle, Lawrence county, Pennsyl- 
vania ; James, farmer on the homestead ; and Isabel, wife of George Hender- 
son, merchant of Newcastle. Mr. Euwer, the father, died in 1838. 

.Archibald Euwer, son of John and Nancy (McMillen) Euwer, was born in 
1799, in Plum township, Allegheny county, where he passed his entire life as a 
farmer. He was a member of the Reformed Presbyterian church. Mr. Euwer 
married Mary, daughter of Ebenezer and Nancy (Mitchell) Gill, and their chil- 
dren were : John, mentioned hereafter ; Nancy Jane, deceased ; Ebenezer G., 
merchant of Trafford, Pennsylvania; Matthew G., retired merchant of Par- 
nassus ; and Archie Nelson, farmer of Iowa, who during the Civil war enlisted 
in Company C, One Hundred and Fifty-fifth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers, commanded by Colonel Pierson, and served over three years in the Army 
of the Potomac, participating in all the battles from Fredericksburg to the sur- 
render of Lee. The death of Mr. Euwer, the father of the familv, occurred in 
1843. 

John Euwer, son of Archibald and Mary (Gill) Euwer, was born July 8,. 
1832, in Plum township, Allegheny county, and received his education in the 
common schools. At the age of sixteen he took charge of his father's farm, 
and until 1885 was engaged in agricultural pursuits. He then moved to Par- 
nassus and there engaged in mercantile business, retiring February 7, 1901, 
since which time he has given his attention to real estate. In 1866 he left the 
homestead and purchased the Walnut Hill farm in Westmoreland county, on 
which he lived twelve years. In 1879 he liought a farm on Puckety creek, which 
he sold six years later on moving to Parnassus. He is a member of the Re- 
formed Presbyterian churcli. Mr. Euwer married, January 11, 1855, Isabella 
M., daughter of Rol^ert and Annie Allen, natives of Scotland, and their chil- 
dren were : Anna Mary, wife of J. McKee Swank ; Amelia Jane ; Margaret G., 
died at. the age of three years; Robert Allen, mentioned hereafter; Archie Nel- 
son, also mentioned hereafter ; Ida May, stenographer for the Central Railroad' 
Company; Elvira Bell, stenographer in Pittsburg; Florence C, kindergarten 
teacher in Allegheny City ; and Lizzie Emma, deceased, graduate of Slippery 
Rock Normal school and for some time a teacher. 

Robert Allen Euwer, son of John and Isabella M. (Allen) Euwer, was 
born May 14, 1862, on his great-grandfather's farm, the homestead of the- 
family, and received his education in the common schools and at the Parnassus 
Academy. At nineteen he established himself as a butcher at Parnassus in 
partnership with J. D. Rowan, but at the end of one year sold out and went to 
Iowa where he was engaged with William Todd as a cattle shipper. He then 
returned to Westmoreland county, and in 1881 again established himself as a 
butcher in Parnassus, continuing the business about three years. He was then 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. ■ 187 

engaged for about four years in the livery business at Parnassus, after which 
he once more established himself as a butcher, thus time at Springdale, Alle- 
ghen\- county. He continued the business for thirteen years and then returned 
to Westmoreland county, where he purchased the furniture business of M. 
G. Euwer & Company, Ltd.. entered into partnership with his brother. Archie 
Nelson Euwer. and established the business under the firm name of Euwer 
Brothers and Company. The enterprise proved successful and the affairs of 
the firm are now in a flourishing condition. Since 1891 J\lr. Euwer has beea 
president of the Springdale Building & Loan Association of Springdale, Alle- 
gheny county. Pennsylvania. He is now serving on the council of Parnassus. 
His political support is given to tlie Republican party. He is a member and 
trustee of the Presbyterian church of Parnassus. Mr. Euwer married Sarah 
J., daughter of the Rev. John Moulton Jones, and they had one child, John 
]\Ioulton, graduate of Parnassus high school and Pittsburg Academy and now 
engaged in bookkeeping. ]\Irs. Euw-er died in 1885. and Air. Euwer subse- 
quently married Katharine, daughter of Matthew Donnell. The issue of this, 
marriage is one child, Archie Lloyd Euwer, at present attending Parnassus 
high school. 

Archie Nelson Euwer, son of John and Isabella M. (Allen) Euwer. was 
born October 24. 1864, on the homestead, and was educated in the common 
schools and at the Oak Dale Academy, Allegheny. After serving one year as 
clerk for William Cruikshank. of Verona, Pennsylvania, he entered his father's 
store in Parnassus in a similar capacity, remaining five years. He then entered 
into partnership with his father, the connection continuing until February, 
1901. when he purchased, in company with his brother Robert Allen Euwer, 
the furniture business since carried on by the firm of Euwer Brothers and 
Co. For some years Mr. Euwer held the office of borough auditor. He is a 
Republican, and a member and trustee of the United Presbyterian church of 
Logan's Ferry. Mr. Euwer married, October 3, 1895, Claribel, daughter of 
James M. and Anna (Stevenson) Greer, of Murraysville, Pennsylvania, and 
they have one child. James Greer Euwer, born August 20. 1901. 

JAMES S. HITCHMAN. one of the prosperous and enterprising 
citizens of Mount Pleasant, traces his ancestry back to an early period, the pio- 
neer immigrant, who was an officer in an English regiment, having come to 
America when George III sat upon the throne of Great Britain. He became 
interested in the condition of the Colonies and sympathizing with them in their 
struggle for political liberty, he soon resigned his position and identified him- 
self with the colonial cause, but refused several important militarv commands 
in the Continental army during the revolutionary struggle. His delicate sense 
of honor would not allow him to draw his sword against the country whose 
uniform he had worn and whose pay he had received for many years. He 
was a resident of Virginia. 

William Hitchman, son of the emigrant ancestor, removed from his home 
in \'irginia to Redstone Creek, in what is now Fayette county. Pennsylvania, 
and which was then supjjosed tf) belong to Virginia. After the close of the 
Revolutionary war he went to Maryland and there married Nancy Gillespie, 
who was an estimable woman and a member of a well-respected family, and 
who bore him twelve children, among whom were the following: James, John, 
William, Robert, Andrew, Samuel, Gillespie, David, Nellie, Elizabeth. Shortly 
after his marriage Mr. Hitchman removed to Mount Pleasant. Westmoreland 



i88 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY 



•county, Pennsylvania, where he followed farming. He was a member of the 
Presbyterian church. 

John Hitchman, son of William and Nancy (Gillespie) Hitchman, was 
born in 1789. When the war of 18 12 broke out he enlisted in a company com- 
manded by Captain Reynolds, was commissioned first lieutenant, and was or- 
dered with his regiment to Baltimore, Maryland, where he served until the close 
of the war. In 1828 he was elected brigade-inspector in the Pennsylvania militia 
with the rank of major and served in that position until 1836. For several years 
thereafter he engag'ed in mercantile business, and in the borough of Mount 
Pleasant, where the greater part of his life was spent, was highly re.garded 
both as a business man and citizen. He married Mary Thompson, who was a 
descendant of the Thompson family, widely known and highly respected in the 
Cumberland valley. She was born at Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, February 
18, 1799, and died March 30, 1870, survived by her only child, William J. 
Hitchman. John Hitchman (father) died in March, 1846, aged fifty-seven 
years. 

William J. Hitchman, only child of John and Mary (Thompson) Hitch- 
man. was born at Mount Pleasant, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, July 
8, 1838. Before he v\'as eight years of age his father died and he was left en- 
tirely to the care of his excellent mother, who instructed him in those right and 
noble principles of action which characterized his mature manhood. The 
greater part of his boyhood was spent at Laurelville, which was a small village 
at the foot of Chestnut Ridge, and early in life he engaged in the tanning busi- 
ness, which he conducted later on an extensive scale with his father-in-law, 
James Shields, and subsequently was associated with Mr. Neel in the same in- 
dustry. Before he attained his seventeenth year he was acting as village school 
teacher, and served in that capacity for several years. Prior to this he began 
dealing in stock in a small way, which business he constantly enlarged, and 
which he still continued to conduct after he became an independently wealthy 
man. He was early engaged in the manufacture of coke under the firm name of 
Stone, Hitchman & Co., with ovens in the vicinity of Tarrs. Later they es- 
tablished ovens known as the Morewood plant, and they conducted an exten- 
sive business along that line for that day. At the Centennial, in 1876, they 
received the medal for the best and finest grade of coke. About the year 1880 
Mr. Hitchman began to deal extensively in coal and coal lands, and he also 
operated to some extent in the production of coal in both Westmoreland and 
Washington counties, both these industries netting him a handsome return. 

He was among the early stockholders in the banking interests of the bor- 
ough of Mount Pleasant, becoming interested in the First National Bank, of 
which institution he later became a director, was the active head of the same 
for many years, and at the time of his death was serving as vice-president. Later 
in company with William B. Neel and J. C. Crownover he formed the Mount 
Pleasant Bank, which they operated vmtil 1893, when it became known as the 
Citizens' National Bank of j\Iount Pleasant, and in this he held a directorship 
until his death. He was recognized as one of the ablest financiers of the 
county, conservative, but just. In 1884 he served as county chairman of the 
Republican party, and through his generalship the county went Republican, 
the first time in its history. He never sought political preferment, although a 
warm and active supporter of the party. He contributed largely in building up 
the town of Mount Pleasant, having erected a goodly number of buildings, and 
in various other ways added to its prosperity. He was a liberal, broad-minded 
man, well and favorably known throughout the community, and he possessed 



HISTORY Op WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 189. 

a host of true friends, who fully appreciated his great moral worth as a man. 
and citizen. He was a member of the Presbyterian church, to the support of 
which he contributed liberally. 

January 2, 1861, I\lr. Hitchman married Elizabeth Shields, daughter of 
James Shields, of Mount Pleasant, and six sons and two daughters were born 
to them: [Mary, unmarried: Alice E., also unmarried; James S., mentioned 
hereafter : Edward T., a coal operator at Wheeling-, West Virginia, head of the 
Hitchman Coal & Coke Company ; John D., William M., a teller in the City- 
Savings & Trust Company of Blount Pleasant ; Walton ]\I., and Arthur. Will- 
iam J. Hitchman. father of these children, died September 26, 1894; he was 
survived by his wife, who is living at the present time ( 1905). 

James S. Hitchman, eldest son of \\"illiam J. and Elizabeth (Shields) 
Hitchman, was born in Mount Pleasant, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
April 29, 1865. He attended the public schools of Mount Pleasant, Pennsyl- 
vania, and at Blairstown, New Jersey, and then entered Princeton College, but 
was shortly afterward called home to take up business duties. In 1886 he en- 
tered the First National Bank of Mount Pleasant in the capacity of teller, 
ser\ing as such until 1893, when he was appointed to the presidency of the 
Citizens' National Bank, which position he held until the reorganization, April 
2, 1904, when it became known as the City Savings & Trust Company and he 
was elected president of the same. He is also largely interested in the coal in- 
dustry, from which he derives a goodly income. He is a staunch Republican 
in politics, but not in any sense of the w-ord an office-seeker, and exercises a 
potent influence in behalf of the party whose principles he advocates. He is 
one of the progressive young men of the community, keenly alive to everything 
which concerns in any way the well being of the town and county. 

ALFRED R. WOODS, of New Kensington, is the son of William P 
Woods, who was born in 181 1, in the north of Scotland, whence he came in 
1 83 1 or '32 to the United States, settling in Center county, Pennsylvania. He 
was a shoemaker by trade, but after his emigration engaged in the lumber bus- 
iness and in farming. In 1861 he enlisted in the One Hundred and Fifth Regi- 
ment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until 1864, when he received wounds 
which proved fatal. He was a member of the Baptist church. Mr. Woods 
married Mary, daughter of Andrew \'asbinder, and their children were: : Oliver 
P.. deceased : William A., assistant warden of insane criminal asylum, Ionia, 
Michigan: Nancy A., deceased wife of William Covert; Joseph V., deceased; 
John B., harness manufacturer of Indiana ; Samuel j\I., also of Indiana ; and 
Alfred R., mentioned hereafter. 

Alfred R. Woods, son of William P. and Marv (X'asbinder) Woods, was 
born November 14, 1857, near Brookville, Jefferson county, and received his 
education in the Soldiers' Orphan school, Dayton, Armstrong county, and at 
the Union Academy. At eighteen he went to learn the marble cutter's trade 
with J. S. Moore, of Brookville, where he remained sixteen years. He then 
entered into partnership with A. B. jMcLain, and together they established the 
marble and granite business in Brookville under the firm name of A. P. McLain 
& Company. At the end of three years they moved to New Kensington, being 
among the pioneers, and there successfully contimied the business. Since the 
spring of 1905 Mr. Woods' son, Robert A., has been sole proprietor. In politics 
Mr. Woods is a Republican. He and his family are members of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church. Mr. Woods married Mary, daughter of John Hains. and 
their children are: Edna M., wife of John C. Sullivan : Robert A., successor to 



igo 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



his father's business ; Lillie E., graduate of Duff College, stenographer for D. 
J. Kennedy, of Pittsburg; Maud M., at home; Anna E., in telephone office, 
Pittsburg; James B., at home; William M., at home; Jackson E., at home; and 
Dorothy, at home. 

ALBERT S. KAUE.MAN, M. D. The father of Dr. Albert S. Kauf- 
man, of New Kensington, was Harrison Kaufman, who was born August 9, 
{840, in Indiana county, son of Samuel Kaufman, who was born May 31, 1812, 
died July 27, 1870, and Sarah (Heckman) Kaufman, born April 28, 181 1, died 
February 12. 1890. both were born in Juniata county, Pennsylvania. Samuel 
Kaufman was a son of Joseph Kaufman and Nancy (Myers) Kaufman, born 
August 8, 1794, died March 9, 1878; both were born in Lancaster, Pennsyl- 
vania. Harrison Kaufman received his education in the Plumville Academy. 
For twenty-five years he taught during the winters and in the summers en- 
gaged in farming in Indiana county. For some time he held the office of town- 
ship auditor. He is a Republican, and for thirty years or more has served as 
elder in the Presbyterian church of Bethel, Pennsylvania. Mr. Kaufman mar- 
ried Margaret, daughter of Levi and Jane Young, of Indiana county, and they 
have children ; Albert S., mentioned hereafter ; Harry E., minister of Pres- 
byterian church at Harrisville, Pennsylvania; Ella Blanche, wife of J. M. Rob- 
inson, teacher in Indiana county ; George W., student at Allegheny Theological 
Seminary ; and Grace E., wife of Harry S. Pounds, farmer of Westmoreland 
county. 

Albert S. Kaufman, son of Harrison and Margaret (Young) Kaufman, 
was born June 11, 1869, in Indiana county, where he received his primary ed- 
ucation in the common schools, passing thence to the Jacksonville Academy and 
the Indiana State Normal school. During four years he taught in the schools 
of his native county. After spending three years in the office of Dr. W. L. 
Shields, of Jacksonville, he entered Baltimore Medical College, from which he 
graduated in 1893 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine, afterward receiving 
the endorsement of Western Pennsylvania Medical College, of Pittsburg. Im- 
mediately after graduation he opened an office in New Kensington, where he 
has since continuously remained and has built up a successful pratice. Dr. 
Kaufman is first vice-president of the Westmoreland County Medical Society, 
is also a member and ex-president of the Allegheny Valley Medical Society, 
and of the New Kensington Physicians Association. He is examiner for the 
Equitable Life Assurance Society of New York, Metropolitan of New York, 
Aetna of Hartford, Connecticut, Sun Life of Canada, Penn Mutual of Phila- 
delphia. Pittsburg Life and Trust, Equitable of Des Moines, Iowa, Bankers of 
Des Moines, Iowa, and Modern Woodmen of America. At one time he held 
the office of auditor of the borough. He is a Republican in politics. He is an 
elder in the L^nited Presbyterian church of Parnassus. Dr. Kaufman married 
Susan E., daughter of M. H. and Jane Henry, of Indiana county, and they 
have children: Mary M., born August 5, 1893; Albert R., born September 5, 
1895; Grace Elizabeth, born July 5, 1898, died February 21, 1900; Anna Bell, 
born November 2.s, 1900 ; Ruth D., born February 28, 1903, died August 23, 
1905, and Helen, born October 13, 1905. 

JAMES M. PATTERSON, of New Kensington, is the grandson of 
James Patterson, who was born in 1773, in county Down, Ireland, and at the 
age of sixteen emigrated to the United States, settling for a short time near 
Stcubenville, in Mrginia. After three or four vears he went to Washington 




u{::^^S^ayL^^ /^.^ 



'-'^M/^V- 1 



'""^i;V 



HISTORY OF IVESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 191 

county, Pennsylvania, where he purchased a farm, antl for the remainder of his 
life gave his attention to agricultural pursuits. In politics he was allied suc- 
cessively with the Whigs, the Know-Nothings. and the Republicans. For 
about forty years he served as elder in the United Presbyterian church of 
Xorth Hope. Mr. Patterson married Mary Miller, and their children were: 
Alexander, Thomas, James, mentioned hereafter; David, John, Jane, wife of 
James Armstrong, of West Middletown : Elizabeth, wife of James Richmond, 
of \\'est Finley township, Washington county, and about 1868 they moved to 
Colorado, where both died : Margaret, wife of Samuel Leiper. of the neigh- 
borhood of Hookstown, Beaver county : Mary, wife of James Tagert, of Alle- 
gheny county. Mr. Patterson, the father, lived to be almost a centenarian, his 
death occurring about 1867. 

James Patterson, son of James and Mary (Miller) Patterson, was born in 
1816, on the old homestead, near West Middletown, where he remained until 
after his marriage, settling then on a farm adjoining the homestead. In 1848 
he sold the property and bought a farm of ninety-six acres near Goodintent, 
where he remained about six years. He then sold this farm and purchased an- 
other of one hundred and seventy-five acres on what was known as Block- 
house run. On this property he made his home until 1866, when he sold it and 
went with his son, James M. Patterson, to Beaver county, where he became the 
owner of a farm of two hundred and seventy-three acres, situated some fifty 
miles from his former home at Tumbleson run, near Hookstown. He lived on 
this farm until about 1885. when he abandoned agriculture and moved to 
Hookstown where he made his home until the death of his wife. He then sold 
his house and resided with his sons on the homestead during the remainder of 
his life. He was a Republican, and for some years an efder of the United 
Presbyterian church. Mr. Patterson married jane, daughter of Hugh and 
Esther Leiper. of Hookstown, and their children were: James M,, mentioned 
hereafter; Esther A., deceased wife of Alford Marks, of East Liverpool; 
Hugh, died in childhood; Sarah, wife of Joseph Armstrong; Anna Mary, wife 
of Pollock Thompson, near Frankford Springs; Hugh (2). farmer on the 
homestead; EHzabeth, wife of Thomas Ramsey, near Mill Creek Church, 
Beaver county ; Amanda, died unmarried ; Anderson, farmer on part of the 
homestead; Delia, deceased wife of David Strauss; Eva. wife of William 
Richmond; David, drowned in the old well when about three years of age. 
The mother of this family died in 1891, and the father passed away in 1895. 

James M. Patterson, son of James and Jane (Leiper) Patterson, Was born 
July 10, 1843, near West ^liddletown, on the homestead which had been the 
Ijirthplace of his father and the home of his grandfather. In 1863 he enlisted 
in Company K, Sixteenth Regiment, Pennsylvania \'olunteer Cavalrv, served 
to the close of the war and was present at the surrender of Lee. 

After his return home he engaged in farming until 1875. when he went to 
Wellsville, Ohio, and there learned the machinist's trade, the practice of which. 
however, he found injurious to his health. He therefore took a position with 
the Brook Oil Company of Cleveland, which he retained twelve or thirteen 
years. In 1894 he moved to New Kensington and establislied himself in the 
undertaking business, which he has successfully conducted to the present time. 
He is a member of Xew Kensington Post. Xo. 636, G. A. R.. P. O. S. of A., of 
New Kensington, and Lodge Xo. 1048, I. O. O. F., also of New Kensington 
In the last-named organization he has passed all chairs and has held for one 
year the office of treasurer. He is a Republican, and during four vcars served 
on the countv committee. 



192 HISTORY OF WRSTMORELAND COUNTY. 

ALBERT M. BEATTY. The great-grandfather of Albert M. Beatty. 
of Ligonier, was William Beatty, who spent his entire life in Armstrong 
county, Pennsylvania, where he followed the trade of a wagonmaker and was 
also engaged in business as an undertaker. His wife was Isabella Colwell, and 
their children were : James, mentioned hereafter ; .William, Absalom, Samuel, 
Jane married William Bowman ; and Margaret, married Samuel Patterson. 

James Beatty, son of William and Isabella (Colwell) Beatty, was born in 
1812, in Armstrong county, and learned the wagonmaker's trade which he fol- 
lowed in connection with that of a carpenter and cabinetmaker, and also en- 
gaged in the milling business. He was a member of the Lutheran church. Mr. 
Beatty married Catherine Richard, and their children were : Mary, married 
Silas Wareham ; Michael, deceased ; William ; Miles, lives in Armstrong county ; 
James, a carpenter and builder in the same county ; Samuel A., mentioned here- 
after; John, a resident of Pittsburg; Daniel, also lives in that city: and Cath- 
erine, wife of Thompson Kelley. 

Samuel A. Beatty, son of James and Catherine (Richard) Beatty, was born 
February 24, 1847, '" Armstrong county, and received his education in the 
common schools. For some years he worked among the farmers of his native 
county. In 1865 he enlisted in the One Hundred and Fourth Regiment, Sixth 
Army Corps, Pennsylvania Volunteers, for one year or during the war, and 
was mustered out of service August 25, 1865. Mr. Beatty married Elenora 
Hawk, and they had children : Ora, wife of Edward Fry; Albert M., mentioned 
hereafter: Wyron W., at home: Smith E. ; Florence A., at home; Gertrude A., 
married Edward Lowry, of Ligonier. 

Albert M. Beatty, son of Samuel A. and Elenora (Hawk) Beatty, was 
born July 29, 1870, and received his education in the common schools. In 1893 
he began to learn the business of a barber with Jacob Hamilton, of Ligonier, 
with whom he remained one year, and then opened an establishment of his own 
in partnership with C. L. Bonser, after conducting the business alone for two 
years. The connection was maintained five years, and in April, 1902, Mr. 
Beatty leased the National Hotel, in Ligonier, of which he has ever since been 
the successful proprietor. He is a member of Lodge No. 964, I. O. O. F., of 
Ligonier. Mr. Beatty married Martha, daughter of James and Martha (Long) 
Gillespie, and they have two children : Margaret, and Eugene. 

MILLER BROTHERS. Clifford E. and Irwin C. Miller, constitute 
the firm of Miller Brothers, proprietors of one of the largest department stores 
of Westmoreland county, located at Arona. The former was born April 22, 
1880, and the latter born September 28, 1876. They are sons of John W] 
Miller and Catherine (Bussard) Miller, the former of whom was born in Hemp- 
field township, in 1851, his parents being Lewis and Susan (Fox) Miller. John 
W. Miller was reared in his father's home, acquired his education in the com- 
mon schools and when about twenty years of age, in company with W. H. Bus- 
sard, purchased the mercantile business of Adam Miller, at Arona. This was 
the nucleus of the present extensive house conducted by the Miller brothers. 
John W. Miller and his partner conducted the business up to the time of the 
former's death, in 1881, when Mr. Bussard purchased Mr. Miller's interest, 
becoming sole proprietor and carrying on the same until 1895, when it was 
destroyed by fire. Following the death of her first husband, Mrs. Catharine 
Miller' became the wife of G. W. Miller, in 1884, and in 1889 G. W. ]Miller 
embarked in merchandising in Arona. In 1894 his wife became the owner of 
the business and conducted the same up to the time of her death, in May, 1902, 



niSlORV OF ]]-ESTMORELAXn COUXTY. 193 

when Clifford E. and Irwin C. purchased the same and have since been its 
proprietors. 

Clifford E. Miller was educated in the county schools and at Leach's Bus- 
iness College, in Greensburg, Pennsylvania and in Grove City College, where 
he pursued a classical course. When only nine years of age Clifford E. Miller 
entered the store and being apt and ambitious, quick in his movements and 
courteous to the patrons, he soon became a valued factor in the conduct of the 
enterprise and it was only a few^ years until he was practically manager of the 
business, tlis brother, who pursued his education in the public schools, se- 
cured a position in early youth with W. H. Eussard, his father's successor, 
with whom he remained until the destruction of the store by fire. He then ac- 
cepted a position with the Madison Supply Company, with whom he remained 
for eight years, four years of the time acting as general manager. In igo2 he 
t.ccepted a position with Eli Sell and Company, of Greensburg, with whom he 
continued for a year, when his business interests in Arona demanded his at- 
tention and he resigned his position there. The brothers have since been closely 
associated in the conduct of the store and in addition to their mercantile enter- 
prise they own and operate a stock farm. Their business in Arona is a large 
department store and within space of ten years their trade has grown so rap- 
idly that their floor space has been increased from six hundred to ten thousand 
square feet, while from forty to fifty carloads of goods are purchased annually. 
The trade has long since reached profitable proportions and in the conduct of 
the enterprise the brothers display marked executive ability, keen discrnment 
and indefatigable energy, iioth are supporters of the Democratic party and 
they are members of the United Brethren church, in which Irwin C. Miller is 
now serving as elder and also as a member of the board of trustees. Clifford 
E. was married, June 7, 1905, to Minnie, daughter of Irwin W. Moore, of New 
Stanton, Pennsylvania. Irwin C. Miller was married May 2, 1905, to Eleanor, 
daughter of Robert J. Anderson, of Manor, Penns}-lvania. 

W. H. BL'SSARD. For three generations the Bussard family has 
been represented in Westmoreland county, and in colonial days was established 
in Pennsylvania, the great-grandfather serving as a .soldier of the Revolution- 
ary war in defense of colonial interests. Being captured by the British troops, 
he was imprisoned and was starved to death while still held in captivity. 

Conrad Bussard. the grandfather, was born in Northampton county. Penn- 
sylvania, and the year 1779 witnessed his arrival in Westmoreland county, ac- 
companied by his wife and one child. They also brought with them a cow and 
around its neck was fastened a bell, which is still in possession of the family. 
Conrad Bussard secured a tract of land near Irw-in Station and there success- 
fully carried on general farming for many years. His death occurred in 1852, 
when he was about seventy-six years of age. 

Conrad Bussard. junior, son of Conrad Bussard. senior, was born on the 
b.ome farm at Irwin .Station, in 1812, and there he assisted his father in gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits until his thirty-third year, when he was married and 
went to a home of his own, settling at what is now Bussardtown, which place 
was founded by his father. In early life he learned and followed the cooper's 
trade and when his labors had brought him sufficient capital to purchase land 
he became the owner of a farm near .-Xdamshurg and there turned his atten- 
tion to agricultural pursuits. In 1865 ''"^' jnirchased his father-in-law-'s farm, 
which now lives in the heart of Arona and in the midst of the richest coal fields 
of Pennsvlvania. He afterward bought Joseph Rombaugh's farm and made 

2—13 



194 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

his home thereon until his death in 1881. He held membership in the Brush 
Creek Lutheran church and gave his political support to the Democracy. He 
married Catherine Shumaker, daughter of William Shumaker, who was the 
owner of the farm now occupied by George O. Bussard. Their children were : 
Mary, wife of Michael Erhart, of Arona ; W. H., and George O., who is also 
carrying on agricultural pursuits in Arona. 

W. H. Bussard was reared at home, acquired a common school education, 
and at the age of eighteen years apprenticed himself to the blacksmith's trade 
which he followed for four years. He afterward returned home and took 
charge of the property, his "brother George having left home. There William 
H. Bussard remained for a year, at the end of which time he purchased a half- 
interest in the mercantile business of John W. Miller and Company, at Arona. 
Following the death of Mr. Miller, in 1882, he became sole proprietor of the 
bi'siness, which he conducted successfully until 1894, when the store was com- 
pletely destroyed by fire. He then purchased the farm where he now resides, 
owning and operating a good tract of land and in addition he is the owner, of a 
sa'i'.'mill, where he engages in the manufacture of lumber. He is likewise a 
coal operator, having one of the valuable coal banks of this portion of the state. 
Mr. Bussard is a Phohibitionist in his political views, taking an active interest 
in the work of the party. He belongs to the Free Methodist church, of which he 
is a steward, and he is classsed with the leading and highly respected citizens uf 
Hcm]3tield township. 

Mr. Bussard was married in 1874 to Eliza Errett, daughter of Jacob Er- 
retl, of Hempfield township, and they had eight children, of wh6m seven are 
hving : Clarence F., a veteran of the Spanish-American war ; Dirbin J., John W., 
James H., Jennie E., Robert E., and Clark E., all at home. 

LE.STER L. LOWE. Four generations of the Lowe family have been 
represented in Westmoreland county, the great-grandfather having removed to 
Tiuffsdale, this county, from east of the mountains. His son, George Lowe, was 
horn at RutTsdale and became a prominent farmer of that locality, spending his 
■entire life there. 

Marks Lowe, son of George Lowe, was also born and reared at Ruft'sdale, 
Lecoming a leading agriculturist of that community, and continued to make his 
liome there until his life's labors were ended in death. He married Sarah 
Brant. 

Lester L. Lowe, son of Marks and Sarah Lowe, was born at Ruffsdale, 
July 13, 1855, and in his youth became familiar with the labors that fall to the 
lot of the agriculturist. He acquired a common school education and for four 
years engaged in teaching in the district schools. When about nineteen years 
of age he apprenticed himself to the carpenter's trade and in 1884 he accepted a 
position with the firm of Hecla Coke Company at Hecla and Trauger, which 
company owned a number of stores. He was identified with the company for 
thirteen vears and a portion of the time acted as manager. On the expiration 
of that period he removed to Ruffsdale, where he was variously employed for 
three years, and during that time he built the Empire Coke Works. In the 
spring of 1901 he came to Youngwood, then a mere hamlet, containing only 
three or four houses. Here he turned his attention to the lumber business and 
also began contracting and building in partnership with Charles R. Haller, the 
style of the firm being Lowe and Haller. In the rapid transformation when 
Youngwood developed from a village into a borough the firm took an active part 
In its improvement, erecting the greater number of the residences in the town. 



HISTORY OF JVESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 195 

Thev now own extensive property interests in the town and have laid out a 
considerable portion of the borough. 

Air. Lowe is a Democrat in politics, with strong Prohibition tendencies 
and in 1892 he was a candidate on the Prohibition tickets for the state legisia- 
tr.re. An active and influential member in the Reformed church, he is now 
serving as one of its deacons, and he belongs to Ruflfsdale Lodge, No. 8, O. of 
AT. He is accounted one of the leading business men of Youngwood. In the 
spring of 1905 he was elected to borough council. 

Mr. Lowe was married in 1894 to Sadie Fiscus, daughter of John Fiscus, of 
Whitney, Washington county, and their children are: Ethel G., Mary E., and 
Alvin F. 

ROBERT ELLIS. The family of which Robert Ellis is a representa- 
tive had its origin, so far as the ancestral history can be traced, in Wales. His 
grandfather was a native of that country and when about six years of age was 
brought to the L'nited States, the family locating near Jones Alill, in Westmore- 
land county, Pennsylvania, where he was reared. He afterward located on a 
farm, where he carried on agricultural pursuits until his death, which resulted 
from being thrown from a cart in which he was standing, when the horses gave 
a sudden "start, throwing him to the ground and breaking his neck. He was 
twice married, his second wife being the grandmother of Robert Ellis. By the 
tirst marriage there were seven children, all of whom are now deceased. By the 
second marriage there were two children — James and Robert. The latter is 
now in his eighty-eighth year and resides in Linn county, Iowa, near Cedar 
Rapids, being the' oldest living resident of that section of county, having located 
there in Alay, 1838, when the Indians were far more numerous in that region 
than the white men. 

James Ellis, father of Robert Ellis, was born in Westmoreland county and 
as his father w^as in humble financial circumstances at the time of his death, his 
children were placed in the homes of neighbors by whom they were reared. 
On attaining his majority, James Ellis learned the cabinetmaker's trade, in 
i\iount Pleasant, Pennsylvania, and afterward went to Ligonier, Pennsylvania, 
where he worked as a journeyman, and while there he became acquainted with 
the ladv whom he made his wife. Later he removed to Madison, Pennsylvania, 
where he opened a shop, and in 1856 he went with his family to Indiana, but 
finding that fever and ague were prevalent in the state at that day, he returned 
to Westmoreland county, after two weeks spent in the middle west. For a 
brief period he lived in New Alexandria, Pennsylvania, and then w'ent to 
Greensburg, while in 1858 he opened a mercantile store in Ludwick, now 
Greensburg, at the corner of West Ottoman and Hamilton streets, where James 
Seanor is now located. There he carried on merchandising until 1895, when he 
sold his business and retired to private life. In early manhood he gave his 
political support to the Democracy, but in 1856 joined the new Republican party, 
which in that year placed its first presidential candidate in the field and con- 
tinued one of its supporters u]) to the time of his death. He held membership in 
the First Presbyterian church and he died April 22, 1897, at the age of seventy- 
seven years, eight months and seven days. He married Isabelle McClintock 
and of their eight children, six are now living, namely : Maggie, wife of M. M. 
Clark, of Claridge, Westmoreland countv : Elizabeth, wife of W. J. Porter, of 
Premont. Towa : Nannie E., wife of J. L. McKcever, of this county; RolxTt : 
Albert C, who for thirty years was a merchant at Pittsburg, Pa. : and Josie, 
-wife of J. C. Zeak, of Morristown, N. J. 



196 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAXD COUNTY. 

Robert Ellis, son of James Ellis, was born in Madison, Westmoreland 
county, October 26, 1848, and was a public school student. At the age of 
twenty years he went west, spending two years in Iowa and two years in Mis- 
souri at farm work. He then returned home and entered his father's store. 
During the following four years he saved his money, and in 1876 entered into 
partnership with his father, a business relation that was maintained until 1881, 
when he sold his interest and began an independent business for himself at 
Weaver's Old Stand, in Westmoreland county. There he remained for nine 
years, enjoying a good patronage, which brought him a desirable, financial re- 
turn. During the latter part of that period conditions changed much, the 
Hecla mines being opened about two miles away from that place. As this left 
him away from the railroad, he began to look around for favorable location, and 
liecided and found that Youngwood furnished the opening that he desired. In 
1890. therefore, he removed to the New Light building, the first structure erect- 
ed in the now prosperous borough. There he opened his line of goods and con- 
ducted business successfully for ten years, when he retired from active mer- 
cantile life and is now enjoying a well earned rest. He, therefore, owns sev- 
eral propertites in Youngwood, together with the old farm homestead in Lud- 
wick, and is regarded as one of the substantial citizens of the county. Inter- 
ested in political questions and issues, Robert Ellis has always been a Republi- 
can and active in community aflfairs. is now serving as president of the school 
board and is secretary of the board of trade in Youngwood. He was also for 
five years postmaster at Weaver's Old Stand and has continued in the same office 
in Youngwood ten years, and in all that time he never missed a connection with 
any train. It was through his instrumentality that the postoffice in Youngwood 
was established in 1891. Mr. Ellis married, October, 1876, Charlotte Byers, 
daughter of John H. Byers, who lived near Weaver's Old Stand. There wert 
three children of this marriage, but only two are living — James B. and Robert 
Ellis, both at home. 

A. H. CAVEN, M. D., engaged in the practice of medicine in Young- 
wood. is a grandson of Alexander and Esther ( Brugh) Caven, residents of 
Westmoreland county, the grandfather following the occupation of farming. 
Their son, Eli Caven, born in Harrold, this county, was there reared and still 
resides upon the old homestead farm. He gives his political support to the Re- 
publican party and served for several years as justice of the peace. He is a man 
of large influence locally and transacts much public business, frequently serving 
as administrator of estates. He enjoys the unqualified trust of the general public. 
For fifteen years he acted as school director, and he has long been a member of 
the United Brethren church, in whichfor many years he has held office. He mar- 
ried Clara M. Campbell, and of their five children, four are yet living: Mary A., 
wife of Dr. F. G. McKlveen ; William A,, a practicing physician of Pittsburg, 
Pa. : A. H., Addison V., at home. 

Dr. A. H. Caven was born at Bottsville, now Harrold. Pennsylvania, in 
Westmoreland county, April 23, 1877, and after attending the common schools, 
became a student in Ligonier, Pennsylvania Classical Institute, and later in Ot- 
terbein University, at Westerville, Ohio. In 1897 he began the study of medi- 
cine, entering the Western Pennsylvania Medical College, at Pittsburg, in which 
institution he was graduated in the spring of 1901. He then located in Pitts- 
burg and for six months practiced with his brother at No. 2126 Fifth avenue. 
On the expiration of that period he returned to Youngwood, and in the three 
years here passed has built up a large and gratifying practice. He has through- 




cy{u^^^^ ^/i^i'-mM^ 



JIISTORV OF WESTMORELAND COUXTV. 197 

out this period been surgeon of the reunsylvania Raih-oad Company. He is a 
member of Youngwood Lodge, Xo. 667, I. ( ). ( ). I'.. Woodland Lodge. Xo. 
310, K. P.. and Y. L'. Lodge, Xo. 108, Grand iM-aternity, also Ivy Comman- 
dery, K. of .M.. Greensburg. He also belongs to the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and is serving as secretary of its board of stewards. 

XICHCJLAS KROilER, the proprietor of the Columbia Hotel, at 
Alverton, W estmoreland county, Pennsylvania, is a native of France, born 
February 21, 1839. He received his educational training in the land of his 
birth, and in 1869, in company with his wife and family, came to America, 
locating in Connellsville, Pennsylvania. He immediately found employment 
in the coal mines, and after ten years of this occupation embarked in the busi- 
ness of photograjjher, being thus engaged for six years. He was then elected 
to the position of constable of Connellsville, and after serving for one year 
in this capacity removed to Everson, where he purchased a hotel known as 
the L'reka House, which he successfully conducted for six years. He then 
erected what is now known as the Kromer House, in Scottdale, Pennsylvania, 
and was its proprietor for eight years. Owing to failing health Mr. Kromer re- 
tired from active business pursuits for two years, during this period visiting 
his native country and renewing his acquaintance with his relatives and the 
friends of his youth. When he was again able to engage in business he re- 
moved to Alverton, Pennsylvania, and there purchased property on which he 
erected the present Columbia Hotel, and in the conduct of which he is npw 
engaged. This is an excellent house, well known to the traveling community, 
and enjoys a generous patronage. In religious faith Mr. Kromer is a Luth- 
eran, and his wife affiliates with the Roman Catholic church. Fraternally 
he is a member of Castle Xo. 238. Knights of Pythias, of Connellsville, Penn- 
sylvania ; Lodge Xo. 242. Improved Order of Red Men, Connellsville; also the 
German Lodge, of Connellsville. 

Mr. Kromer married in 1866, in France, Catherine Weibel, who was born 
June 14, 1844. daughter of Henry and Christine (Clair) Weibel. Of this mar- 
riage the following named children have been born : Jacob, a resident of 
Youngwood, jjroprietor of the Youngwood Hotel ; Harry, a foreman in the 
Scottdale Foundr_\- and Machine Shop ; Charles, an engineer in the emplov of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad Company ; Phillip, a roller in the Scottdale Mills ; 
Catherine, wife of Xicholas Kaeff, and Elizabeth, wife of H. 3il. Davis. 

W. H. PROW'X, ^I. D., engaged in the practice of medicine in 
Youngwood, was born in Uniontown, Maryland, June 21, 1868, a son of John 
A. and Mary E. (Engler) Brown, while his paternal grandparents were JNIoses 
and Susan (Harbaugh) Brown. The grandfather, who was of Swiss descent, 
was a railroad contractor and lived and died in Ellicott City, Maryland. John 
A. Brown was born and reared in Ellicott City and when a young man went to 
Uniontown, where he learned the trades of painting and paper-hanging, be- 
coming a contractor in those departments of business activity. In 1884 he re- 
moved to Washington, D. C, where he was employed in the treasury depart- 
ment of the government service. He died in 1895, at the age of sixty-three 
years. In politics he was a Democrat, and was a man of influence in the coun- 
cils of the party in Maryland, and while there he held a clerkship in the state 
legislature of Maryland for several years. He held membership in the Metho- 
dist Protestant church. His widow is still living and resides with her daugh- 
ter at Armbrust, I'cnn.sylvania. They were the parents of four children, of 
whom three are livmg: Susie C, wife of G. C- Mawkberz, of Waynesboro, 
Pa.; Xellie G., wife of T. F. Armbrust, li\'ing in the liorough of Armbrust; 
and W. H. 



198 HISTORY OF IVESTMORHLAND COUNTY. 

Reared in his parent's home, Dr. Brown supplemented his early educa- 
tional privileges by study in the Western IMaryland College, at Westnimster, 
Maryland, and when eighteen years of age he began reading medicine under 
Dr. T. J. Shreeve, of L niontown, Maryland, with whom he remained for a 
year, and in the fall of 1886 he matriculated in the University of Maryland, 
being graduated from the medical department in the spring of 1889. He lo- 
cated for practice in New Stanton, Pennsylvania, where he remained for three 
and a half years, and then removed to Lancaster county. I'ennsylvania, but 
after a brief time he went to Washington, D. C, where he was located for two 
vears. In the winter of 1895 he came to Youngwood, where he has built up a 
large and lucrative practice, having the confidence of his professional brethren 
and of the general public as well. 

Dr. Brown was married in 1902, to Irene M. Gibbons, a daughter of 
Joseph and ^Mary (Scott) Gibbons, of Washington, D. C. Dr. Brown belongs 
to Woodland Lodge, No. 210, K. P., of Youngwood; Painterville Lodge, J. O. 
U. A. M., of New Stanton ; and the Youngwood Lodge of the Grand Frater- 
nity. In the line of his profession he is connected with the Westmoreland 
County Medical Society, the Pennsylvania State Medical Society and the 
American Medical Association. He is a member of the Alethodist Episcopal 
church and is one of its trustees. When the borough of Youngwood was or- 
ganized he was elected a member of the town council, which position he now 
holds, and he is a man of sterling character and much esteemed, both pro- 
fessionally and socially. 

PHILO N. PYATT. The ancestor of Philo N. Pyatt came to the 
United States from France about 1786. He was a Baptist and an earnest 
worker in behalf of Christianity as he interpreted its teachings. Taking part in 
the French revolution, he was deported by his government and became an 
American citizen. The family name was originally spelled Payette. 

Rev. James B. Pyatt, father of Philo N. Pyatt, was born in Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, where his father was engaged in contracting and building. The 
former was reared in his native city and after completing his literary education 
he prepared for the ministry as a student in Bethany College, in Virginia, after 
which he was ordained as a preacher of the Disciple church. After filling pul- 
pits in connection with several different churches, he accepted a call to the pas- 
torate of the church at Johnstown, Pennsylvania, where he remained for sev- 
eral years, and about 1882 he went to Los Angeles, California, where several 
members of the family had preceded him. There he died when about eighty 
years of age. He filled' the pulpit there on Sunday prior to his demise, and con- 
tinued his active work in behalf of the church throughout the years of his man- 
hood. During the Civil war he was chaplain of the Ninth Pennsylvania Re- 
serves, and was one of the well known and honored Christian men who joined 
the army to administer religious teachings among the soldiers. He had a 
brother, 'Joseph O. Pyatt, who was one of the noted educators of the United 
States, and was also an author of note. For years he and his wife were in- 
structors in the Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
and his reputation along educational lines extended throughout the United 
States. Rev. James B. Pyatt married Mary C. Stevenson, and they had eight 
children, but only two are living, the daughter being Maggie, wife of William 
Horner, of Los Angeles, California. 

Philo N. Pyatt was born in Evansburg, Pennsylvania, June 9, \%S^\ and he 
attended the public schools between the ages of six and sixteen years, when he 
began earning his own livelihood. He took up the study of telegraphy, and i'.i 
1873 was assigned to duty in an office in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. In 187S he 



FilSTORY OF Jl'ESTMORELAND COUNTY. 199 

• 

left the telegraph service, and for eiglit years was a trainman in the passenger 
service of the Philadelphia and Erie railroad, being located at Harrisburg. In 
1886 he went to Scottdale where lie again entered the telegraph service, and in 
Febrnar\-, 1902, he removed to Youngwood, where he established himself in the 
mercantile bnsiness. but left the active management of his store to his son, 
while he continued his duties as a telegrapher. He was promoted to the posi- 
tion of train dispatcher of the Pittsburg division of the Pennsylvania railroad 
in July, 1902, and is now acting in that capacity. He votes with the Republican 
party, and is influential in political circles. He served two terms as councilman 
of Scottdale, and during the last year was president of the council. He is a 
member of Westmoreland Lodge, No. 518, A. F. and A. M. ; Scottdale Council, 
No. 807. R. A. : and also belongs to the Baptist church. Mr. Pyatt married, in 
1880, Harriet E. Strickler, a daughter of Isaac Strickler, of South Huntingdon 
township, Westmoreland county. Their children were : Caleb F., now de- 
ceased : Thomas Earl, manager of his father's mercantile business, and postmas- 
ter of Youngwood : and Oscar, still in school. 

GEORGE W. CON, proprietor of a bakery in Youngwood, was born 
in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, January 4, 185 1, and is descended from 
Revolutionary ancestry, his grandfather, Abraham Cox, having fought for in- 
dependence. He was an iron moulder by trade and removed from the eastern 
to the western slope of the mountains when the latter district was being opened 
up, and worked for its iron deposits, the old charcoal furnaces being used with 
the iron moulding business in Fayette county, where he was employed. 

To a limited extent George W. Cox attended the public schools, but his 
privileges in that direction were not extensive. His active career has been a 
varied one, he having been engaged in numerous business enterprises in diiTer- 
ent parts of western Pennsylvania. He removed, August 19, 1901, to Young- 
wood from West Newton, where he was engaged in the grocery business for 
four years. On coming to Youngwood he established a bakery which he is now 
conducting, and in this enterprise is meeting with desirable sucess. There were 
only four or five houses in the borough when he located here, but with 
the rapid growth of the place his business has also grown. He is a man of 
genial disposition and commercial integrity, and numbers among his friends the 
best people of the borough. He exercises his right of franchise in support of 
the men and measures of the Republican party. Mr. Cox was married, in 1872, 
to Sarah Keihl, a daughter of Adam Keihl, of North Huntingdon township. 

\\". HERBERT NISWONGER, son of John H. and Rebecca M. 
(Deusenbury) Niswonger, was born August 13, 1875, n^^r Mendon, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania. He attended the public schools and worked on 
the farm in his native place until he had reached the age of twenty-one years. 
He then struck out for himself, going to Everson, Fayette county, and took a 
position in a grocery store, in January, 1897. He followed this business until 
February, 1904, when he went into partnership with John F. Eicher and 
opened a shoe store, under the firm name of Niswonger and Eicher, at Scott- 
dale. They carry the highest grade of goods, making a specialty of the Drn- 
lap and Crawford shoes for men and the Patrician shoe for women. Mr. Nis- 
wonger is the business manager of the establishment and is a man well suited 
to the 'business, being of an unusuallv affable and enterprising disposition. In 
addition to this business he is a stockholder in the Kinncv Company, of Scott- 
dale, the Beltom Coal and Coke Company, of West X'irginia, and is also inter- 



200 HISTORY or WESTMORELAXD COUNTY. 

ested in South Sharon Mercer Company, of Pennsylvania. He is active po- 
litically, a Republican, and always takes a deep interest in public affairs, and 
while a resident of Everson he was elected tax collector of Upper Tyron town- 
ship. He is a member of the Knig-hts of Pythias, ruaster at arms, Scottdale 
Fountain Lodge, No. 443, and of the Independent Order of Puritans, and is 
a member of the Bankers' Life Insurance Comjjany. Mr. Niswonger married, 
June 10, 1897, Hattie J. Crise, daughter of William and Kate Crise, a native 
of South Huntingdon township, Westmoreland county. They have had two 
sons who died in infancy. They are members of the United Brethren church, 
Mr. Niswonger being a trustee. He has twice represented his church at the 
Allegheny conferences, in 1903 at Philipsburg, and again in 1904 at Scottdale. 
He is also active in Sabbath school work. 

LEVI T. GILBERT, M. D., son of Alexander and Sarah (Tarr) 
Gilbert, was born June 8, 1865, at Bullskin, Fayette county, Pennsylvania. His 
father was born near Gettysburg, Adams county, Pennsylvania, May 23, 
1824, and at the age of seventeen years came to Fayette county where he 
worked at his trade, bricklaying, which he had learned in Adams county, and 
after five years he purchased fifty acres of wild land in Bullskin township. 
This he constantl)- improved, clearing the land, erecting buildings and culti- 
vating the soil. Later he added twenty acres, and followed his trade in con- 
nection with his farming until he was seventy years of age. Most of the brick 
buildings in this section of the country were erected by him. In politics his 
sympathies have been always strongly Democratic, but he has ever displayed 
the tolerance for other people's views of a true gentleman. At the advanced 
age of eighty-one years he still displays his natural activity. His wife, Sarah 
Tarr Gilbert, a daughter of James R. Tarr, was born in Westmoreland county, 
near Tarr 's Station. She died in 1901, aged seventy-one. Eight children were 
born to them : Josephine, wife of Frank Gilbert, of Columbus, Ohio : John, a 
bricklayer, of Butler county, Pennsylvania ; Mary, deceased wife of James 
Marsh, of Irwin, Pennsylvania ; Minerva, deceased wife of Irwin Aluir, Brad- 
dock, Pennsylvania ; Lydia. wife of John T. Farmer, Homewood, Pennsyl- 
varHa; James R., a farmer at Bullskin, Pennsylvania; Levi T., of whom 
later; and Frank, who died in childhood. 

Levi T. Gilbert was reared on the farm and lived there until he reached the 
age of twenty-two years. When he was seventeen years old he began to 
teach in the public schools of his native town and continued this vocation for 
five years. His education was acquired at the public schools of his native 
place, at the Edinboro Normal school and at the Institute at Mount Pleasant, 
Pennsylvania. In 1888 he went to Mount Pleasant to live, and was employed 
there for three years in the general store of D. P. Lowe. In 189 1 he removed 
to Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, and found employment. In 1892 he took up 
the study of medicine with Dr. J. E. Rigg, then entered the Western Penn- 
sylvania Medical College, in the "fall of 1893, from which institution he grad- 
uated in 1896. He first took up practice in Alverton, Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, and continued there, engaged in general practice, for eight 
years. In April, 1904. he located at Scottdale and has established a large prac- 
tice, due to his high position in the profession and also to his genial and trust- 
inspiring disposition. He is a member of the American Medical Association, 
the Westmoreland County Medical Society and the Pennsylvania State Med- 
ical Association. Also a member of A. I. 6. K. M., No. 342, the M. W. of A., 
Camp 9779, of which he is also medical examiner, Orpad Commandery of 



HISTORY OF IVESTMORELAXD COUXTV. 201 

Scottdale, of Phi Beta Pi, of which fraternity he was chairman during his col- 
lege days, and of the Western Pennsylvania Alumni Association. He is also, 
in addition to his regular practice, medical examiner for the New York Mu- 
tual, the Equitable and the Prudential Life Insurance companies. He is a 
contributor to the New York Medical Journal and the Pennsylvania Medical 
Journal. 

Dr. Gilbert married, June 12, 1887, Rebecca Brooks, daughter of George 
W. and Lucinda Brooks, of Fayette county. They have two children, Carl 
A. and Earl \'. Gilbert. The family is active in church work, belonging to 
the Methodist Episcopal church, the doctor being class leader and active iii the 
Sabbath school. He is the owner of a comfortable home at 100 North Chest- 
nut street, and is one of the leading men of his town, standing at the head of 
his profession, commanding the sincere respect and admiration of all who 
come in contact with him. 

W. J. BARKELL, son of William and Eliza ( Piper) Barkell, was 
born Tulv 16. 1849, at Cornwall, England. He received a limited education, 
beginning to work at the copper mines at the age of nine years, receiving the 
munificent sum of eight cents per day for the first year, ten cents per day for 
the second and twelve cents in the third year. This was for work about the 
offices, and at the age of twelve he went into the mines and worked for the sum 
of seven dollars and fifty cents per month, continuing there until he was sev- 
enteen vears old, his wages increasing yearly until he was receiving twenty 
dollars a month. He then removed to the north of England, to a town called 
Cramlington, where he found employment in the coal mines and continued 
there or twenty-one years, during fifteen years of which time he was mine 
boss and fire boss combined. In 1887 he came to America and located at 
Scottdale, Pennsylvania, where he has since made his home. He was em- 
ploved for some ten years in the sheet mill, then opened a small music store and 
has since given his entire attention to the business. He is an excellent musician, 
having taken up the study of music when a lad of fifteen years, giving atten- 
tion to both string and brass instruments, and when twenty-five years old he 
began to teach. While at Cramlington he conducted one of the finest brass 
bands and directed one of the most excellent choirs in England, competing 
with all the famed bands and choirs of the country. For sixteen years he was 
director of the P. M. choir and of the Cramlington prize brass band, which 
company of musicians he organized, trained and perfected. Five of his former 
pupils have come to this country and become successful teachers of band 
music. Upon first coming to Scottdale he gave his entire attention for a 
short time to teaching music but then entered the sheet mill, thus dividing his 
time between music and mechanics. In his present establishment, which he 
opened in 1898, he handles all kinds and grades of musical instruments and mu- 
sicians' supplies, and in addition a full line of kodaks, photographers' supplies, 
bicycles, sewing machines, and their necessary appurtenances. About the year 
1892 or 1893 there appeared in the Aletronome, a musical journal published by 
Carl Fischer, of New York city, a voting contest for the most po])ular cnrnct- 
ist and conductor in the United States, the contest open for six months. When 
the votes were counted it was found that W. J. Barkell had received the great- 
est number by a larofe margin, the votes coming from all parts of the United 
States and Canada. The prize he received was a cornet valued at two hun- 
dred dollars. His orchestra is in constant demand in all narts of the state, and 
is composed of the best talent to be fomid. He is a member of one of the exc- 



202 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

cutive board of the American Federation of IMusicians, and a member of the 
A. I. O. K. M., Arpad Commandery, No. 342, of Scottdale. 

Mr. Barkell married, (first) in 1870, Emma J. Bell. She died in June, 
1884, at the age of thirty-three, leaving six children : Eliza, living at home ; 
Mary, wife of John R. Riebe, general secretary of the Young Men's Christian 
Association, Berwick, Pennsylvania ; William, a telegraph operator for the 
LJnion Supply Company, Scottdale, Pennsylvania, married Bessie Moran ; 
Robert B., a 'clerk for the H. C. Frick Company, Scottdale, married Esther 
Longenecker ; George K., in the employ of the United States Express Com- 
pany, Pittsburg, married Cora Myers; Emma J., died in infancy. Mr. Barkell 
married (second), in November, 1890, Sarah Robson, of Scottdale, a native 
of England. Thev are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, Mr. Barkell 
being a member of the official board of the same. He is also a member of the 
board of directors of the Young Men's Christian Association, and is a stock- 
holder in the Scottdale Machine and Foundry Company. 

CHARLES H. JAQUETTE, son of Anthony and Mary Ann 
(Shaw) Jaquette, was born October 25, 1871, at Allegheny City, Pennsylvania. 
The father, a native of Oswego, New York, died May 10, 1901, the seventieth 
anniversary of his birth. The mother is still living, residing with her son, 
Charles H. Jaquette, and is a native of Connellsville, Pennsylvania. 

The grandfather of Charles H. Jaquette, Peter A. Jaquette, was a native 
of northern France, and son of a French duke. He married a native of south- 
ern France, and they emigrated to America and settled in New York state. 
Their son, Anthony Jaquette, the father of Charles H. Jaquette, was reared 
in New York state' but settled in Pennsylvania when a young man and mar- 
ried a resident of Connellsville, Mary A. Sha-w. He was in the oil business, a 
producer in Green county, Pennsylvania, for many years, but later in life he 
was engaged in the tailoring business in Pittsburg and Allegheny. He accom- 
panied Francis ]\Iurphy on his lecture tour, taking the platform as a lecturer 
during about three years, a strong advocate of temperance. He lived in vari- 
ous towns about the country for longer or shorter periods, including Scott- 
dale, 1875-79 ; Mount Pleasant, 1879-82 : Scottdale, 1882-83 ; Abilene. Texas, 
1883-87; thence to Plyattsmouth, Nebraska; 1892, Kansas City; then re- 
turned to Scottdale, 1897, where he lived the remainder of his life. He was 
a man who figured prominently in political affairs, and was the candidate for 
the legislature on the Independent ticket in 1882 and came within twenty votes 
of being elected. He was also closely identified with the labor troubles, hav- 
ing represented the state of Pennsylvania as arbitrator in the Lorillard labor 
strike, the J. P. Clark-Throd strike and others. He was a public speaker of 
more than ordinary ability, taking the "stump" in various campaigns, usually 
allied with the Republican party. He was largely instrumental in turning 
Westmoreland county from a Democratic stronghold to a Republican fortress. 
He enlisted as a private at the beginning of the Civil war in the Seventh Vol- 
unteer Infantry, West Virginia, Company E, but was mustered out on account 
of sickness after two years service, as second lieutenant, each step won by 
bravery. He was tendered a captaincy on several occasions but refused to ac- 
cept the commission. After recuperating from his illness he raised a com- 
pany at Morgantown. Pennsylvania, and took it to the field, then joined his old 
company again. He served through both battles of Antietam as well as in 
many of the other principal battles of the .A.rmy of the Potomac. He was a 
member of the Baptist church, of Free and Accepted Masons and Grand Army 



THE 

NEW YORK 

[PUBLIC LIBRARY^ 

^ Astor, Lf nox and TUden I 
Foandsfions. 




(SvA\- (J.> 



iCVAaA^JOsAJL/ 



HISTORY OF UT.STMORF.t.lXD COUXTV. 



of the Republic. He had a family of ten children: i. Mary Eva, died youngf. 
2. Hannah M., died young. 3. John \\'., a resident of Butte, Montana. 4. Minnie 
R., deceased wife of H. C. Deitterich. 5. Alice, wife of Georo-e B. Mellinofer, 
of Scottdale. 6. William A., who went to the Philippines with Company K, 
Fifth Regulars, and served three years. He enlistetl first with the Rough 
Riders, in Bucky O'Neal's regiment from Phoenix, Arizona, and was trans- 
ferred to Company A, first territorial Big Four, United States Volunteer In- 
fantry, as corporal at the Georgia camp. He was then mustered out of volun- 
teer service and joined the company, as a private, going to the Philippines, and 
was mustered out as sergeant major. He returned to America but almost im- 
mediately re-enlisted, with the Twenty-seventh Regulars. Being an excep- 
tionally fine penman, he was called into service at headquarters, but refused to 
leave the boys. 7. Lucinda, wife of G. B. Hitchman, of Mount Pleasant. 8. 
Benjamin F., contracting painter, and proprietor of a tourists' house. Los 
Angeles, California. 9. Charles H., of whom later. 10. Sarah Elizabeth, wife of 
C. V. Leonard, of Kansas City, Missouri. 

Charles H. Jaquette was educated in the public schools of Mount Pleas- 
ant and Scottdale. In 1883. when a boy of only twelve years, he began to 
learn the jeweler's art, meanwhile keeping up his studies at night. He was 
first employed at Abilene, Texas, where he spent four years, then went to 
Kansas City and spent five years more, fitting himself for his chosen work. 
He then went to Plattsmouth, Nebraska, to fill a position as watch inspector 
for the B. and M., a branch of the C. B. and Q. R. R. This position he filled 
from 1887 to 1891, at the same time carrying on a private business, handling 
a general stock of jewelry goods. In 1891 he sold out and went to Kansas 
City and found employment at his trade, at the same time taking a course at 
the Kansas City School of Optics, whence he graduated. For three years of 
this time he was head watchmaker for the Edwards and Sloan Manufacturing 
Company, and for one year was manager of the Emory Bird Thayer Company 
of the same city. He then engaged in business on his own account, meanwhile 
studying at the South Bend (Indiana) College of Optics. In January, 1897. 
he located at Scottdale, and in September of the same year opened a fine jew- 
elry establishment, fitting it up in the most modern and elaborate manrer. 
This business he conducted until 1903, when he .sold out to the J. S. Parker 
Company, with whom he was employed for a little more than a year. In 
April, 1905. he purchased the stock and business of J. A. Bobbs, where he is 
fitting up a most admirable establishment, and will make a specialty of optics, 
etc. He is a business man of the highest ability and stands high in the estima- 
tion of his fellow-townsmen, his position being wholly the result of his own 
unaided efforts. He is a member of S. of V., Camp 125, and is captain of the 
military department of this society; member of Americus, Royal Arcanum -ind 
of the American Insurance Union. Mr. Jaquette married, May 22, 1891, 
Bertha May Rounds, daughter of Reuben and Francis Rounds. She is a na- 
tive of Toulon, Stark county, Illinois, born .August 6, 1872. They have four 
children: Mary Helen, Harry Anthony, George William and Charles Glenn. 
They are active members of the Baptist church. 

ROBERT RAMSAY. Among those whose names and deeds form 

part of the histon,' of Westmoreland county none will be remembered loneer 

or with rnore respect and afifection than Robert Ramsey, for many vears an 

honored citizen of Shafton. and afterward of Latrobe and of Mount Pleasant. 

The grandfather of Robert Ramsay was a coal operator, ownin-r mines 



204 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTY. 

near Dunfermline, Scotland, in tlic early days of the Scotch coal niininj^- in- 
dustry. William Ramsay (father), a native of Scotland, was a miner, and in 
1852 emigrated to the United States, but after remaining here four years re- 
turned to the land of his birth. In 1863, however, he came a second time to 
this country and made his home at Larimer, in this county. His wife was 
Elizabeth Sharp, also a native of Scotland, and they had a son Robert, men- 
tioned hereafter. The death of Mr. Ramsay occurred April 16, 1885, and that 
of his widow August 13, 1889. Both are buried in the Union cemetery at 
Shafton. 

Robert Ramsay, son of William and Elizabeth (Sharp) Ramsay, was 
born October 28, 1840, sixteen miles northwest of Edinburg, near Dunfermline, 
county of Fife. Scotland. At an early' age he gave promise of engineering 
ability, and embraced every opportunity of fitting himself for that profession. 
At the age of twenty-three he and his wife came with his parents to the United 
States, and he worked at the machinist's trade in Pittsburg, afterward being 
employed in the coal mines on the Monongahela river. In 1865 he went to 
Shafton, where he became mining engineer for the Shafton Coal Company. 
His services were so satisfactory that in 1870 he was given general charge of 
the operations by being advanced to the position of superintendent of the com- 
pany, which position he held for eleven years. He then became associated with 
Messrs. Andrew and Thomas ]\I. Carnegie, also natives of Dimfermline, Scot- 
land, by serving as superintendent and engineer at the Monastery mines and 
coke works of the Carnegie Company until 1883, when lie moved to Mount 
Pleasant to be more centrally located and to take general charge of the mines 
of the H. C. Frick Coke Company, into which company the Carnegie Com- 
pany's coal and coke properties had previouslv been mersfcd. Then followed 
a long and close connection with Messrs. H. C. Frick and Thomas Lvnch in the 
management of the vast Frick interests. This position he retained until 1888, 
when he became general consulting engineer of the entire companv and su- 
perintendent of the Standard mines and coke works, at that time the largest 
and most complete plant of its kind in the world. He had a very orginal mind 
and a strong natural bent toward things mechanical, as is evidenced by the 
many new mechanical devices which he invented and introduced in and about 
the mines. In 1886 he built the new Standard shaft, which has held the world's 
record for large outputs and is considered by the best authorities the finest 
shaft in the country, his g-enius being esneciallv manifest in the beautv and 
simplicity of the design. This plant has been the subject of many articles in 
technical and scientific journals from mining men the world over. He also 
engineered and superintended the erection of the Mount Pleasant water works 
and many other improvements made in the Connellsville coke resfion by the 
Camegie-Frick interests. He and his wife were members of the Presbyterian 
church. Mr. Ramsav married, January 4, i86r. Janet, daughter of William 
and Margaret (White) Erskine, of Elgin colliery, near Dunfermline, and thev 
had children: William. Erskine, Robert. Morris R.. John A.. Charles S., An- 
drew C, George S., ATarp-aret, Elizabeth. Janet and Mary Stuart. The sons, 
as they grew up, p-ave evidence of having inherited their father's tastes with 
no small portion of his ability. The eldest son William is an engineer on the 
Pennsylvania railroad. Erskine is a minine and mechanical engineer, banker, 
coal and coke operator and iron manufacturer at Rirmin"-ham. Alabama. He 
was also chief engineer and assistant genera! mnnaeer of the Tennessee Coal, 
Iron & Railroad Company at Pjirmingham, Alabama, some fourteen vears. 
Robert is a mining engineer and superintendent for the H. C. Frick Coke Com- 



HISTORY OF tlT-STMORELAKD COUXTV. 205 

pany at United. Pennsylvania. Morris R. is a mining engineer and coal oper- 
ator at Birmigham. Alabama. John A. is a superintendent for the H. C. brick 
Coke Company at iNIount Pleasant, Pennsylvania. Charles S. has charge of 
engineering and construction work for his brother, Erskine, at Birmingham, 
Alabama. Andrew C. is studying mining engineering at Lehigh University. 
George S. has only recently finished school and is engaged in engineering 
work. In the spring of 1898 j\Ir. Ramsay sustained an attack of grip, from 
which he never fully recovered. In ]\Iay, 1899, he set out to visit his birth- 
place in search of health, but before reaching there was prostrated with 
antemia at East Kilbride, Scotland. His death occurred August 11, 1899, his 
wife, his daughters, Elizabeth and Janet, and his sons, William and Erskine, 
being with him at the time. His remains were brought to this country and 
funeral services were held at his late residence in Mount Pleasant. He was 
buried in Union cemetery near Shafton, August 26, 1899. Mr. Ramsav was 
recognized as having no superior as a mining and mechanical engineer in this 
country. He was a man whose intellectual force, indomitable energy ^nd 
blameless character have built for him a monument of respect and love in the 
hearts of all who knew him. It can truly be said of him that his works follow 
him. The mechanical and mining genius characteristic of Mr. Ramsay was 
shared by his three brothers. Morris Ramsay, at the time of his death, in 1892, 
was general manager of the Southwest Coal and Coke Company at Mount 
Pleasant, and had formerly been chief engineer of the entire H. C. Frick Coke 
Company. William S. Ramsay is superintendent for the H. C. Frick Coke 
Company at the Morewood mines near Mount Pleasant, (ieorge S. Ramsay i? 
general superintendent and chief engineer of the Shawmut Coal Company at 
St. Marys, Elk county, Pennsylvania, he having previously held the same 
position for the Colorado Fuel & Iron Company, of Colorado. His wife with 
the children remaining at home now live at Greensburg, Pennsylvania. 

CHARLES L. HOLTZER, son of William and Leah ( Zeis) Holtzer, 
is a native of Westmoreland county, born August 27, 1863, just east of Greens- 
burg. His father, William Holtzer, was born and spent his life in Westmore- 
land countv. He was a farmer, and a man well and favorably known through- 
out that district. He was an active member of the Lutheran church. His 
father was Frederick Holtzer. William Holtzer died in February. 1898, at 
the age of seventy-nine years. His widow is still living, a resident of Delmont, 
Pennsylvania. Their family numbered eight children: William, deceased; 
Robert, deceased : Emma, wife of J. R. Klinginsmith, of Greensburg ; Jacob 
H., a resident of Delmont, Pennsylvania ; Charles L., of whom later ; Sad'ie E., 
wife of John Walters, of Pitcairn, Pennsylvania: Maggie, wife of Weddle 
Martz, of Delmont ; Theodore E., of Youngwood, married Catherine Luce, of 
Pittsburg. 

Charles L. Holtzer was reared on the farm and attended the public schools 
of his native place. In 1888 he went into the roofing business on his own ac- 
count, at Delmont, and continued at that for five years. He then engaged as 
a salesman for a sewing machine business at Greensburg, which position he re- 
tained for five years. He then located at Scottdale and opened a music store 
and sewing machine establishment. May 2, 1898, and this business he is con- 
ducting at the present time. He has a full line of musical instruments of all 
descriptions, sheet music, etc. He assumed the agencv for the LTnited States 
Express Company at Scottdale, April 8, 1904. ]\ir. Holtzer married, October 



2o6 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

II, 1891. Alice Smith, daughter of O. P. and Mary Smith, of Westmoreland 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Holtzer are members of the Lutheran church, he being 
ordained a deacon in 1903. He is also a member of the Maccabees. 

FRED M. LEWELLYN, son of Charles and Christina (Protzman) 
Lewellyn, was born March 18, 1871, at Morgantovvn, West Virginia. His 
father, Charles Lewellyn (deceased), born near the Laurel Iron Works, West 
Virginia, was a farmer and also a cabinet maker. 

Fred M. Lewellyn attended the public schools of his native place, but at 
an early age began the trade of cabinet-making with Price Brothers, Morgan- 
town, with whom he also learned the business of painting. He continued with 
this firm until 1889, when he located at Scottdale. He then, with a partner, 
opened a painting and decorating business, under the firm title of Lewellyn 
and Keister, with an establishment at 602 North Broadway. This firm existed 
until 1896, when Mr. Keister withdrew, and the entire charge of the business 
was assumed by Mr. Lewellyn. At that time the business of the firm was con- 
fined to contract painting and decorating in Scottdale and vicinity, but when 
Mr. Lewellyn took charge of it he put in a large line of paints, varnishes, pic- 
ture mouldings, etc., in addition to the former business. In August, 1898, he 
removed to his present location, 219 Pittsburg street, and enlarged the business 
in all branches, putting in a stock of wall paper, and adding other art lines. 
The establishment has constantly grown until it would be a credit to a place of 
much larger size than Scottdale. The business is divided into two distinct 
lines, the painting and decorating department, where he employs from eight 
to ten men, and the art department, which latter includes books, stationery, 
holiday goods, toys, etc. He devotes his entire time and attention to the busi- 
ness, and is one of the most prominent young business men of the borough. 
He married, in June, 1892, Ella Strickler. daughter of Wilson (deceased) and 
Jennie Strickler. They have one child, Charles A. Lewellyn. 

JOHN L. HOWARD, son of Cornelius and Sarah (Wolf) Howard, 
was born December 9, 1863, in Preston county. West Virginia. On the pater- 
nal side he is of Scotch, English and German blood, and on the maternal side of 
German blood. The Howards came to this country many generations ago 
and settled in Delaware, whence they scattered to West Virginia and Penn- 
sylvania and then farther west. 

John Howard, the grandfather of John L. Howard, was born in Delaware, 
but went to what is now West Virginia, then Virginia, and was a member of 
the legislature formed to secede from the parent state and become a distinci 
member of the Union. He was a man who took a deep interst in political 
affairs and was a strong Republicn. He held many offices, and was active in 
business affairs, engaged in farming, the hotel business and various other 
enterprises, always successfully. His farms were operated largely by his sons, 
while he attended to his other interests. His children were: John W., painter 
and glazier, of Indianola. Iowa; Thomas D., who died about 1891, a dealer and 
manufacturer in lumber at Grafton. West Virginia : Claus, carpenter, of Okla- 
homa : Cornelius, father of John L. Howard, is a farmer and resides near 
Newberry, West Virginia : Susan, deceased, was the wife of James R. Smoot, 
Newberry : Martha, deceased, was the wife of John Powell, Newberry. Cor- 
nelius Howard, son of John Howard and father of John L. Howard, has spent 
the latter part of his life on the farm near Newberrv, but was formerly in a 
mercantile line. During the Civil war he served the Union cause, in the West 



HISTORY OF ]VESTMORELASD COUXTY. 207 

Mrginia Cavalry, and was mustered out at the close of the war as commis- 
sary sergeant. For the past forty years he has been an active member of the 
:Me'thodist Protestant church. He has three children: John L., of whom later; 
Senie, widow of John B. Fram, of Concord, Nebraska: James E., tool dresser, 
of Smithheld, \\ est X'irginia. 

John L. Howard attended the public schools until he reached the age of 
twenty-one }ears, when he entered a general store at Burton, \\'est \ irginia, 
that had a postoffice and railroad office attached. He performed duties as a 
clerk for eight months, then went to Tumelton, West Virginia, in the capacity 
of a clerk, his duties being in connection with the post and railroad offices. He 
continued there for five years, then for eight months was connected with the 
Montana Coal and Coke Company, :\lontana. \\est \'irginia, as a clerk in the 
companv store. He then formed a partnership with J. R. Smoot and J. N. 
Bentley,' under the firm name of Smoot, Bentley and Company, and established 
■ a general store at Ten '\Yi\e, West Virginia, also handled lumber, etc. They 
did business for five years, then dissolved, and Mr. Howard became manager 
of company stores at Camden and Gauley, West Virginia. He was employed 
thus for eight months, and then was forced by sickness to abandon the posi- 
tion. After recovering he formed a partnership with John Calvert, and en- 
tered the mercantile business at Smithtield, doing business under the firm name 
of Howard and Calvert. After five \ears they sold out. and Mr. Howard lo- 
cated at Scottdale. He purchased the business of F. W. Wright, April 27, 
1904, situated at the corner of Pittsburg and Chestnut streets. He carries a 
full line of dry goods, notions, millinery, etc., ocupying two floors. His es- 
tablishment is one of the most attractive and modern in this vicinity. He is a 
member of Independent Order Odd Fellows, Oral Lodge, No. 20, of New- 
berrv, West Virginia ; Damon Lodge, No. 5, Knights of Pythias, of Newberry ; 
Wetzell Lodge, No. 39, Free and Accepted Masons, at New Martinsville, 
\\'est \'irginia, and of Clarksbury Commandery, No. 13, Knight Templars 
and .Adaniram Chapter, No. 11. He married, November 11, 1893, Susie Blue, 
of Grafton, daughter of John W. and Mary Blue. They have one son, Walter 
Howard. Mr. Howard is a member of the !\Iethodist Protestant church, and 
his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

JONAS M. KENNEL was born January 21, 1867, at Champion. I'^ay- 
ette county, Pennsylvania, son of Jacob H. and IMary (INliller) Kennel. The 
mother is still living, but the father died. March 21, 1900. Hfe was a son of Solo- 
mon and Rebecca (Hoyman) Kennel, both of whom were natives of Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, and of German parentage. Jacob H. Kennel was a na- 
tive of Somerset county, a farmer, and during the latter part of his life a 
stockdealer. His life was spent in Fayette county from the time he was fif- 
teen years of age. His farm was eighty-six acres in extent. He was the father 
of the following children: Jonas M., of wdiom later; Norman, of Scottdale, a 
grocer; Wilford, died in September, 1903, w-as a grocer of Scottdale; Simon 
of Champion, Pennsylvania, farmer and miller ; Charles, of Donegal township, 
farmer : William, of Scottdale, mill worker. 

Jonas M. Kennel was brought up to farm life and received his educa- 
tion in the public schools. In 1890 he engaged in the grocer business at the 
Dexter Coke works, Fayette county, and remained there for three years.' He 
then located at Scottdale and started in business in company with J. C. Kennel, 
under the firm title of Kinnel and Kennel. Tliis firm existed for about two 
years; then J. C. Kennel withdrew and was succeeded by O. D. Weimer and 



2o8 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND CObWlY. 

the business was carried on under the name of Weimer and Kennel. ]\lr. 
Weimer was succeeded by Wilford Kennel, and the firm name became J. M. 
Kennel and Bro., which name existed two years. Jonas M. Kennel then sold 
his interest to his brother and removed to Kifertown, where he bought the old 
Hickey stand and conducted that business for some four years. At the end of 
that time he sold out and purchased the old homestead of his father in Saltley 
township, Fayette county. He operated the farm about one year, and then 
entered the employ of the Union Supply Company and was employed at David- 
son, Summitt and Hazelett during about one year. He then purchased his 
present establishment and has continued there since, engaged in the grocery 
business and also dealing in tinware, flour and feed. He has built up a large 
business by his practical and honorable methods. He is a stockholder in the 
Iron Company of America, located at Roanoke. Virginia, and is the owner of 
four valuable properties, three of them dwelling houses in the borough of 
Scottdale. He is truly that noble American type, a self-made man, for he 
started at the bottom with nothing but a large stock of pluck and energy. While 
yet in his bovhood he purchased his time of his father by giving him one-half 
of his earnings, continuing this until he was twenty-one years old. During 
this time he saved of his share of his earnings seven hundred dollars. With 
this as a basis, he began his successful business career at the age of twenty-one. 
In politics his sympathies are Democratic. He is a member of Royal Arcanum, 
Woodmen of the World, Modern Woodmen and the Eagles. Mr. Kennel mar- 
ried, in June, 1891, Kate Dixon, daughter of Andrew and Barbara (Staufifer) 
Dixon, a native of Fayette county. Seven children: Grace, Mary, Ray, Edna, 
Annie, Catherine (deceased), and Ruth Kennel. They are members of the 
United Brethren church. 

JACOB E. WINEMAN, controlling important business interests in 
Youngwood, Greensburg and other parts of Westmoreland county, was born 
in Hempfield township, December 31, 1868, a son of Andrew and Caroline 
(Rugh) Wineman. His father was born in Germany, and was a son of John 
George and Catherine Wineman who came to the United States from Wur- 
temberg, Germany, when their son Andrew was an infant, settling in Hemp- 
field township. While they made two removals at later dates they continued 
residents of that township. There Andrew Wineman was reared. He learned 
the trade of cabinet making when nearly all furniture was made by hand, and 
he made many coffins used in that .early day. Later, however, he withdrew 
from the trade and following his marriage located on the home farm near 
Youngwood, where he residecl up to the time of his death. There his widow 
still makes her home. Much of the furniture in their home was made by 
him, and the first cook stove, which he bought at the time of their marriage, 
is still in use. Mr. Wineman died February 24, 1904, in the faith of the Luth- 
eran church, of which he had long been a member. His political support was 
given the Republican party. His family are also connected with the Lutheran 
church. He had ten children, eight of whom are living: Anna M., wife of A. 
F. Eortz, a hardware merchant of Greensburg; Lizzie A., wife of H. M. Zun- 
del, of Greensburg: Mary J., at home; Jacob E. : Gustavus A., a furniture 
merchant of Greensburg: Charlotte A., wife of Harry Truxell, of Youngwood; 
William H., who is working for his brother Jacob : and George F., who is also 
working in the meat market at Greensburg. 

Jacob E. Wineman, having acquired his education in the common schools, 
entered business life at the age of sixteen years by buying and selling cattle. 



HISTORY OF IVESTMORELAND COUNTY. 209 

He seemed to have a natural aptitude for the business and became an expert 
buver, so that he was enabled to realize a handsome profit from his investment. 
In 1891 he decided to open a meat market but, having worked for the fimi of 
Bortz and Bierer. of Greensburg, he was persuaded by them to enter into a 
partnership and opened a branch shop on Mill street, Greensburg, the main 
shop being located on Pittsburg street. The same year Mr. Bierer withdrew 
from the firm, and Mr. Wineman and Mr. Bortz contimied the business. In 
1899 Mr. W'ineman purchased his present farm of one hundred acres in Hemp- 
field township and removed to his new home the same spring. When the 
town of Youngwood was laid out he opened a butcher shop, and the firm are 
now conducting markets in Greensburg and Youngwood, carrying on an exten- 
tive business as dealers in meats. Mr. W'ineman is a man of much business re- 
source and ability. He has made judicious investment in property, owning 
real estate in both boroughs as well as his farm. He was also one of the 
organizers of the First National Bank of Youngwood, and is now serving as 
one of its directors. He was also one of the organizers and the treasurer of 
the Youngwood Building and Loan Association, and he is a director of the 
Westmoreland county Agricultural Association, which has been his connection 
therewith since its organization sixteen years ago. He was married, Septem- 
ber 13. 1893, ^o Rebecca Bierer, a daughter of Amos Bierer, of Greensburg. 
Thev have become the parents of five children : Andrew, Amos, Mary R., John 
and Catherine, all of whom are yet living with the exception of the second. In 
his political views Mr. Wineman is a Republican. He belongs to the Lutheran 
church, in which he served as deacon for many years, and in matters relating 
to the welfare and improvement of the county he is deeply and actively inter- 
ested, while in his business affairs he displays the enterprise, energy and adapta- 
bility that characterize the typical American citizen. 

B. R. SMITH, AI. D. Among the pioneer settlers of Sewickley town- 
ship, Westmoreland county, was numbered Samuel Smith, who was one of the 
first to locate in the Quaker settlement there who was not a believer in that 
religious sect. He purchased his farm from one of the original members of 
the Society of Friends, or Quakers, and for many years carried on agricultural 
pursuits. 

Cyrus Smith, son of Samuel Smith, was reared in Sewickley township on 
the farm which his father purchased, and in early life adopted carpentering as 
his chosen occupation. He has since worked as a builder, and for many years 
has resided in or near Irwin. He served for three years as a defender in the 
L'nion cause in the Civil war, and then took up his abode in the locality which 
has since been his home. He holds membership with the Grand Army of the 
Republic. He married Esther Biggs, and their children are: Edward, a busi- 
ness man of Irwin : Samuel, living in ^^IcKeesport ; and B. R., of whom later. 

Dr. B. R. Smith was born near Irwin, Pennsylvania, April 2, 1869. He 
spent his boyhood days under the parental roof, and acquired his education irt 
the Irwin schools, \\hen sixteen years of age he entered the H. K. Porter 
Locomotive Works, where he served an apprenticeship of three and a half years 
and later he was employed as a journeyman machinist in the Westinghouse 
plant, at Wilmerding. Pennsylvania, for two years. It was while there that 
he entered upon the study of medicine preparatory to making its practice his 
life work, and during the summer vacations of his college course he continuecf 
to work at his trade. He began the study of medicine in 1891, reading under 
the direction of S. E. Mowry, of Wilmerding, and in the fall of that same vear 



2IO HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

he was enrolled in the University of the City of New York, from which he was 
graduated with the class of 1895, being one of the honor men of the class. 
Following his graduation he located in Irwin, Pennsylvania and for some time 
was associated in practice with Drs. C. E. and W. H. Taylor. Later he took 
charge for a short time of the practice of his former preceptor. Dr. Mowry, 
who was then ill, and in the fall of 1896 came to Jeannette, where in intervening 
years he has built up a large and enviable practice. He is a member of the 
county and state medical societies and the national medical association, and is 
one of the well known practitioners of Jeannette. Fraternally Dr. Smith is 
connected with Jeannette Lodge, No. 486, Benevolent and Protective Order 
cf Elks, of which he was one of the organizers. In politics he is a Republican, 
actively working in the ranks of the party for its growth and success. 

EDWARD ALVIN MYERS. The i\Iyers family, to which Edward 
Alvin Myers belongs, is of German descent. The grandfather emigrated from 
Germany to the new world and settled in Westmoreland county, where he pur- 
chasd a farm lying in Penn township, near the present borough of Jeannette. 
This property was later inherited by his sons, Solomon and John. 

Solomon Myers was born in Penn township, about 1838, and upon the 
old homestead spent the days of his boyhood and youth and continued to re- 
side there until 1900, when he sold the property to his son John, and has since 
been making his home among his children. He has always voted with the 
Democracy, but has never been an aspirant for office. He belongs to the 
Lutheran church, and for many years served as one of its ofificials. He mar- 
ried Hattie E. Schrum, who died in 1891 at the age of fifty-one years. Their 
family numbered eleven children, of whom nine are yet living: Amos A. J., 
resides at -Penn Station ; Morris W., a carpenter of Jeannette : Jacob E., a 
lumber merchant at Penn Station ; Zachariah, a carpenter at Penn Station ; 
Jennie M., wife of Aaron Mowery, of Lima, Ohio ; Rev. Solomon D., a min- 
ister of the Lutheran church, at Vandalia, Illinois ; John S., living on the old 
homestead farm : and Charles C, employed by Edward A. Myers, the young- 
est member of the family. 

Edw-ard Alvin Myers was born in Penn township, January 18, 1874. and 
no event of special importance occurred to vary the routine of farm life for 
him in his boyhood days. After completing a common school course of study 
he entered the Greensburg Seminary, and at seventeen years of age began his 
business career as a clerk in the grocery store of Hess Brothers, at Jeannerette. 
He served in that capacity for four years, when, in recognition of his ability 
and fidelity, he was made manager of the business and remained in. that posi- 
tion for two years, and September i, 1897, with the capital acquired from his 
industry and economy, he established a store of his own. His straightforward 
business methods and earnest desire to please his patrons soon secured him a 
liberal patronage, ami after seven vears his store is to-day one of the lar- 
gest and best of the kind to be found outside of the principal cities. Mr. Myers 
gives his political allegiance to the Democratic party when national questions 
are involved, but at local elections votes independently. Fie belongs to the 
Improved Order of Heptasophs, and to the Lutheran church. He married, 
June 7,' 1898. Lillian Grove, a daughter of Jacob Grove, of Jeannette. They 
have one son. Earl G., and a daughter, Catharine Arlile, born January 10, 1906. 

WILLIAM F. EUWER is a representative of varied and important 
business interests in Jeannette. He was born in Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, March 31, 1870, his parents being Matthew G. and Elizabeth (Logan) 



/ 



HISrOKV OF WESTMORELAXD COUMV. 211 



Einver. His father was born in New Texas, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
and when seventeen years of age began teaching school, which profession he 
fullowed for three years, and then acceptd a position in a store in Allegheny 
City. Later he engaged in business on his own account, but met with failure in 
llie widespread financial panic of 1873, when so many business men went down. 
He afterward accepted a clerkship, and thus worked until he had satisfied his 
creditors. He then engaged in business for himself at Parnassus, where he 
remained for six years. Later he transferred his business to Verona, where 
he remained up to the time of his retirement from business life. He then again 
took up his abode in Parnassus, where he is now living retired. He belongs to 
the Reformed Presbyterian church, in which he has served as elder for many 
years. To him and his wife were born seven children, of whom five are yet 
living: Xorman L., Bertha S., Theodosia H., Xancy C, and William F, 

William F. Euwer having mastered the elementary branches of learning, 
taught in the common schools ; he continued his education in Parnassus Acad- 
emy, and at the age of sixteen years entered the store of the firm of Arthur 
& .Sliowdelmyer. at Allegheny City, as an errand boy. He was later made 
clerk, having charge of one counter, and subsequently was advanced to a gen- 
eral clerkship, continuing in the store for about three years, when he resigned 
and accepted a position with his father in Verona, After two years he became 
a stockholder in the firm. In 1897 he severed his connection with that house, 
removed to Jeannette, and in partnership with George Wliitmyer, purchased 
the furniture and carpet business of E, G. Euwer, The firm style of Euwer 
■& Company has since been maintained, and the business has steadilv grown 
until they now carry a large stock of goods and enjoy a constantly increasing 
and profitable patronage. He has other business aside from merchandising, be- 
ing one of the directors in the Jeannette National Bank, the president of the 
Jeannette Oil and Gas Company, and the treasurer of the Jeannette and West 
Newton Street Railway Company. Mr. Euwer is a Republican, whose patriot- 
ism is stronger than his partisanship. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal 
church, in which he is serving as a trustee. He also holds membership with the 
Improved Order of Heptasophs and with the Maccabees. He is regarded as 
one of the progressive business men of Jeannette, having the ability of quickly 
discerning a good business opportunity and taking advantage thereof. His 
<nterprise and energ}- have been the dominant factors in hissuccess, and his 
position as one of the substantial citizens of the county is attributable entirely 
to his own eflforts. jMr. Euwer married in 1894, Alice Whitmyer, a daughter 
of George Whitmyer, of Oakmont. Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and they 
have three children : Margaret E., Paul, and Virginia. 

C, E. ML^LLIN. A well-known name in the financial circles of 
Mount Pleasant is that of C. E. Mullin. The parents of Mr. Mullin were 
Vv'illiam D. and Mary A. (Shupc) Mullin. The former died in 1890, and tlie 
latter resides in Mount Pleasant. 

C. E. Mullin was born March 8, 1861, in Mount Pleasant, where he re- 
ceived his primary education in the public schools and afterward attended the 
Blount Pleasant Institute, graduating in 1882. Prior to this, though in the 
same year, he graduated from the Iron Citv Business College. After com- 
plctmg his erlucation he engaged for a time in the .grocerv business in Mount 
Pleasant, and later went into the dry goods business under the firm name of 
The C, E, Mullin Company. Subsequently he closed the business, and in 
June, 1895, became cashier of the Farmers' and Merchants' National liank. 



212 . HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTY. 

This institution was incorporated in 1893, and carries on an extensive busi- 
ness, both foreign and domestic. j\Ir. Mulhn has held the position of cashier 
continuously for the last ten years and still retains the office. 

He was one of the promoters of the Mount Pleasant Tool Company, and 
is now a member of the official board of that institution. He was one of the 
organizers of the East Pittsburg National Bank, at Wilmerding, Pennsylvania, 
and now belongs to the board of directors. He is a stockholder in different 
financial institutions of Pittsburg, in the First National Bank of Irwin, in the 
First National Bank of Jeannette, and in various concerns at Greensburg. He 
has been a director in the Citizens' Building & Loan Association of Mount 
Pleasant since its organization. In 1902 he formed a partnership with \V. A. 
Kalp under the firm name of Kalp & Mullin, and together they purchased the 
'■James Neal farm," which was situated within the limits of the borough of 
Mount Pleasant. This estate, which consisted of ninety acres, they laid out in 
town lots, disposing of them by sale. Mr. Mullin is the owner and manager 
of several farms in difterent parts of the county. He is a member of Marion 
Lodge, No. 562, F. and A. M., of Scottdale, Greensburg Chapter, Greensburg 
Commandery, K. T., Valley Consistory, No. 320, of Pittsburg, the Heptasophs 
and Modern Woodmen of America. He is a member of the L^nited Brethren 
church, and has been for years connected with the official board. 

Mr. Mullin married, October 18, 1894, Lulu M., daughter of W. H. Evans, 
o-f the vicinity of New Stanton, Pennsylvania, and they were the parents of the 
following children: Charles E., Paul E., William D., Mary Genevieve, and 
Edward E. The mother of these children died October 2, 1901, and Mr. Mul- 
lin married, March 24, 1903, Mrs. Sallie (Woodward) Shields, daughter of 
Joseph Woodward, of Columbia, Missouri. Mr. and Mrs. Mullin have one 
child, Emily Agnes. 

WILLIAM FRANKLIN MORRISON. The family of which Will- 
iam Franklin Morrison is a representative is one well known throughout West- 
moreland county. Charles E. Morrison, the father of Mr. Morrison, was born 
in 1830, in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, and from i860 to 1863 engaged in 
mercantile business in Mount Pleasant township. He established a branch 
store at Ruffsdale in 1863, and for several years. conducted the two. He then 
went to Donegal where he enga.^ed in the same line of business with his 
brother, Dr. Morrison, subsequently moving to Port Royal. In consequence 
of failing health he withdrew for a time from business and retired to his farm, 
afterward returning for a few years to commercial life. He was active in local 
politics and held several township offices. He was one of the charter members 
of the Mor.nt Pleasant council of the R. A., and belonged to the K. P. He 
and his wife were members of the Lutheran church. 

Charles E. Morrison married Sarah E., daughter of Abraham and Sarah 
fCorer) Hays. The former was a native of Westmoreland county, and spent 
his life in Mount Pleasant township with the exception of a few years passed 
in East Huntingdon township. His farm consisted of two hundred and fifty- 
eight acres. He was county commissioner in 1853-54-55. and later served as 
poor director. In politics he was a staunch Democrat. He and his wife were 
the parents of children : Sarah E., married Charles E. Morrison, as mentioned 
above ; Kate and IMollie, died unmarried ; Lucinda. married C. R. Booker ; 
Susan, married Anthony Leightey : a daughter died in cFTildhood : Abraham 
was killed in one of the battles of the Civil war : John ; Peter : and Isarael, an 
attorney-at-law, died in Pittsburg. Mr. Hays lived to the advanced age of 



lIlSrOKY OF IVESTMOREL.-LXD COUXTV. 213 

ninety-three. j\lr. and Mrs. ]\Iorrison had children: Delia, married John A. 
Rav,'of Pittsburg, president of the Burgettstown National Uank, and of the 
First National Bank, of Hickory, Washington .county. Pa., who is also agent 
and real estate manager for the Pittsburg and Buffalo Coal Company : Charles 
Oscar, machinist in the Armor Steel Plate works, at Homestead, Pa. ; and 
^^■illiam Franklin, of whom later. 2\lr. ■Morrison died in 1885, in Ruft'sdale 
where he had resided for a year previous to that event. 

William Franklin Morrison, son of Charles E. and Sarah E. (Hays) Mor- 
rison, was born December 8, 1863, at Weaver's Old Stand, Mount Pleasant 
township, and was educated in the public schools and at Duff's Business Col- 
lege from which he graduated April 24, 1882. He then became his father's 
assistant in the latter's business, and continued to serve in that capacity until 
the death of the elder Mr. ^Morrison, when he closed the business and went to 
Johnstown. After remaining there one year as clerk he returned to his old 
home and entered the service of the United Coal and Coke Company, as book- 
keeper, but at the end of a year resigned in order to take a position as chief 
clerk and manager with the J. D. Boyd Coal Company, at Uniontown, Fayette 
county. This position he retained for nearly ten years when he resigned in 
order to enter the service of the Armor Beef Company, also at Uniontown. 
After remaining with them one year he tendered his resignation, accepting the 
position of secretary and treasurer with the Thompson Glass Company, of 
Uniontown, and continued to discharge the duties of his office for three years. 
He then went to Mount Pleasant where he engaged as district manager with 
the Mutual Life Insurance Company, of New York. He has had an eventful 
political career. In 1886 he was elected a member of the town council, and in 
1888 was re-elected in Uniontown. He was chosen to serve on the board of 
education at Mount Pleasant in 1902, the same year was elected president of 
the board, and in 1905 was re-elected. He has been active in both local and 
state politics since 1S87. and in 1902 was elected to the state legislature, being 
re-elected in 1904. During his first term he served on the committee of ways 
and means, law and order, mines and mining, iron and coal and manufactures. 
He is now serving his second term, and is chairman of the committee on manu- 
factures, and secretary of the committee on mines and mining. He also be- 
longs to the committee on law and order, iron and coal, pensions and gratuities 
and insurance. He is identified with the following fraternal orders : Favette 
Uodge, No. 228, F. and A. M. ; Uniontown Chapter Xo. 165: Uniontown Com- 
Tiiandery, No. 49 : Pittsburg Consistory ; Syria Temple. Pittsburg ; Olivett 
Council, Grcensburg. 

Mr. Morrison married (first) in 1884, Anna B. Weineman, of Greensburg, 
Pennsylvania. In 1890 she lost her life through the explosion of a lamp which 
ignited her clothing, and burned her so badly she died the next morning. Their 
children were: I. Charles Clyde, graduate from the Mount Pleasant High 
school, and then took a two years' course at Buckncll. He is now a student in 
tlie law department of the University of Pennsylvania. 2. Verna ;\label was 
drowned while in bathing in the Allegheny river, near Summer Camp, at God- 
frey, Pennsylvania, on the afternoon of August 19, 1905. The accident was 
caused by stepping into a deep sinkhole, the presence of which was unknown to 
the bathers. She lost her footing and was carried down to her death. Her body 
was recovered twenty minutes later, and medical skill cxliaustcfl in an effort to 
save her life, but too late, the silver cord had been broken. Miss Morrison was 
twenty years of age and had graduated at the Grcensburg High s::liool with 
Tionors in June. 1905, about thirty days before lur untimely departure. She 



214 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

was an exceedingly bright and amiable voung lady with a large circle of friends- 
who most sincerely mourn her death. Air. Morrison married (secoad), ApriL 
1892, Sarah R., daughter of Dr. B. A. Pichtner, of Somerset county, Penn- 
slyvania. 

ALBERT B. STAUFFER, son of Henry W. and Mary C. (Booker) 
Stauffer was born November 4, 1871, in Tyron township, Fayette county,. 
Pennsylvania. The great-grandfather of Albert B. StautTer, Martm Stauffer,. 
lived for a number of vears at Eveston, following agricultural pursuits. He 
was a member of the Mennonite church. He had three children: Sarah, wife 
of Samuel Heuth ; John T., the grandfather of Albert B. StauiTer ; and Abram 
D. John T. Stauflfer lived and died in Westmoreland county. In early life 
he was a farmer, but later entered the baker's business and was the pioneer of 
that industry in Westmoreland county. For some years he operated from 
twenty to thirty ovens near what is now called Stauffer Station. Politically 
he was a Republican, and held the office of constable for several terms. He 
was a member of the N. B. church. He died in 1900, at Mount Pleasant, his 
home for the last few years of. his life. His children were: Henry W., David,, 
Mary, wife of John Swain ; Elizabeth, wife of Young Yetters ; Martha, Cath- 
erine,' wife of Benjamin Kouchenour ; Joseph, James, Frank, Belle and Mead. 
Henry W. Stauffer was born and reared in Westmoreland county and followed 
farming and butchering for a number of years. During the last few years he 
has partially retired from active business. He is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and has filled most of the offices. His children are : Alice, 
wife of Albert Herbert Martin, a butcher, of Scottdale ; Charles W. ; Susan, 
wife of James Murphy; Elizabeth, wife of Hugo Wessing; Albert B., of whom 
later: Lucv ; Laura, wife of John Beswick Rebecca; Emma; John T. 

Albert P.. Stauffer was reared and educated in his native place, attendmg 
the public schools until he reached the age of eighteen, then entering a rolling 
mill at Scottdale and continuing there for some six years. He then entered 
the butcher business and has continued at it since. He is the proprietor of per- 
haps the finest market in that section of the state, a market supplied with all 
the latest and improved machinery for working up the meats and stocked with 
the hig-hest grades of fresh and canned meats. He slaughters all his own 
meats, and niarkets his produce in Scottdale and its vicinity. He is successor to 
his brother, C. W. Stauffer, in the business, having taken charge of it ]\Iay 24, 
1904. He is one of the best-known men of Scottdale, and is a member of the 
Eagles. His wife. Cazie, daughter of Daniel Fritz, died in 1902, at the age of 
tweiity-four, leaving two children. Lulu Marie and Mary Frances Stauffer. 

SMITH BUTTERMORE, son of P. M. and Eliza J. (Thorndell) 
Buttermore, was born February 7, 1880, at New Haven, Fayette county. Penn- 
sylvania. On the paternal side the family is of German and Scotch descent, 
and on the maternal side of English descent. The parents of Smith arc both 
living, the father being a blacksmith of New Haven. The grandfather, George 
Buttermore, was a farmer but gave most of his attention to teaming on a 
route between Baltimore. Connellsville and Pittsburg. 

Smith Buttermore was reared in his native town and educated in the pub- 
lic schools. In 1900 he went into business at Dawson, Fayette county, Penn- 
sylvania. He established the first bakery in that place, and remained in busi- 
ness there until Tune, 1904. He sold out and located at Scottdale, where he 
succeeded to the'bakerv business of W. H. EUis, September, 1904. the oldest 



HISTORY OF U-ESTMORIlL.L\D COLWrV. 215 

establishment of its kind in Scottdale, it having been estabhshed liy J. C. 
Anawalt in 1882. At the death of IMr. Anawalt his son conducted the busnicss 
until -Mr. Ellis took charge of it in 1902. He in turn sold it to Mr. LUittennore, 
who has continued there since. In addition to a large bakery business he has 
an ice cream manufactory, and in both branches of his trade has been very suc- 
cessful. His establishment is one of the leading concerns of this part of the 
county, the business covering a radius of some six miles about Scottdale. He 
is one of the most prominent men of the borough and is active in politics, his 
sympathies being Democratic. While at Dawson he was a member of the 
central committee. ^Mr. Buttermore married, April 25, 1900, Cora Edwards, 
daughter of Roland and Margaret Edwards, of Councilsville. Mr. Edwards 
established the first bakery at that place. They have one child, Mildred Butter- 
more. They are members of the Presbyterian Church at Scottdale. Mr. 
Buttermore is a member of Royal Arcanum, A. I. O. K. M., Omar Com- 
manderv, No. 330, of Dawson, of the Eagles and of the Modern Woochuen of 
America. 

ALEXANDER FLEMING was born October 27, 1872. in Airdry, 
Scotland, son of John and Elizabeth (Cunningham) Fleming. The family 
sailed to America in 1874 and located at Port Washington, Ohio, where the 
father was employed as superintendent of the blast furnaces. Lie was su])erin- 
tendent of various furnaces in Ohio, then removed to Pennsylvania, about 
1881. settling in Mifflin county, later in Huntingdon county, where he was 
engaged as superintendent of a furnace, thence going to Wampum, Lawrence 
countv, and then returned to Ohio, about 1884. He soon returned to Penn- 
sylvania and spent four years at Penn Furnace, then went to Bellefonte and 
operated the furnace for about two years, then engaged with the Cameron Coal 
and Iron Company, as superintendent. He is at present living at McKeespnrt, 
Pennsylvania, and is virtually retired. He is a member of the Presbyterian 
Church. His children are: Isabella, wife of J. A. Little, of McKeesport ; 
Grahmey, wife of James Bryce, of Homestead, Pennsylvania : David, deceased ; 
Magdaline. a music teacher at McKeesport ; Harry, a shipping clerk, 
McKeesport: Alexander, of whom later. 

Alexander Fleming attended the Carnegie night school, then took a special 
course in LaFayette College at Easton, Pennsylvania. He studied chemistry in 
the laboratories of the Bellefonte Furnace Company, the Cameron Iron and 
Coal Company, the Joseph E. Throo)) Company. Everett. Pennsylvania ; 
the Monongahela Furnaces, McKeesport. He then accepted a position with 
the Carnegie Steel Company, working at their various plants in and around 
Pittsburg. In 1897 he settled in Scottdale, engaged as the chief chemist 
of the H. C. Frick Coke Company. He filled this position for seven ycar.s, 
then, in 1904, entered the business world as an independent chenn'st. opem'ng 
the laboratory where he is at present. He has the agency for the Climax 
Refining Company, of Cleveland, Ohio, and is distributing agent for western 
Pennsvlvania and as far as Altoona, West Virginia, and Maryland. He makes 
a specialty of water analysis, and is an expert in firebrick manufacture, in addi- 
tion to the analysis of all kinds of ore, minerals, coal, coke, etc. Fie receives 
commissions from all parts of the L'nited States, and does the work for most of 
the independent firms in the coke regions. He alreafly requires an assistant in 
order to keep abreast of the great volume of work that pours in upon him. He 
was one of the incorporators and is one of the stockholders of the Savage Hill 
Firebrick Company, of Fairhope, Pennsylvania. He is vice-president of the 



2i6 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTY. 

West Virginia Fire Clay Company, Thornton, West Virginia, and it was 
through his experiments and professional skill that the coke-oven brick has 
been "raisel to the present efficiency. Formerly the life of a fire brick in the 
ovens was from thirty days to one year, but through Mr. Fleming's untiring 
efforts the life of a brick has been prolonged to last from ten to twelve years. 
He stands at the head of his profession and is a member of the American 
Chemical Society. He is also a member of A. I. O. K. of M., Scotia Com- 
manderv, No. Ii6, of McKeesport ; Marion Lodge, No. 562, F. and A. M., 
Scottdale ; Connellsville Chapter, 283, R. A., Connelsville : Uniontown 
Commandery, 49, K. T., Uniontown, Pennsylvania; Scottdale Lodge, No. 
y77, B. P. O. E. Mr. Fleming married, September 26, 1895, Josephine F. 
Gogley, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Amick) Gogley, of LTedford coimty, 
Pennsylvania. They have three children, Ruth, Elizabeth and Marion Flem- 
ing. They are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, Mr. Fleming 
being also a member of the choir. 

CLARENCE W. MACBETH, formerly of the regular army and 
now an enterprising merchant of Scottdale, was born in East Huntingdon 
township. Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, August 23, 1879. He is a son 
of William H. and Louise (Welty) Macbeth, of East Huntingdon, and his 
father is a prosperous farmer of that township. 

His boyhood and youth were spent in attending the inililic schools and 
assisting his father in carrying on the homestead farm. Just prior to attaining 
his majority (July, 1900.) he enlisted as a private in Company K, Fifth Regi- 
ment, United States infantry, for three years' service in the regular army, 
going first to Fort Sheridan, Illinois, thence to Presidio, California, and from 
there to Manila, Philippine Islands. During his service in the Philippines, 
which covered a period of two years and nine months, he performed active 
duty in the field for a greater portion of the time, and consequently became 
perfectly familiar with the strenuous life of a soldier in the far east. His 
regiment, which was almost constantly on the move, visited the more important 
islands except two, and the following is a partial list of places at which it was 
stationed, viz : Caraman, Battac, Bontoc, F'ayum. Dolores, San Quintin Xar- 
vacan, Lopez, San Pablo, Santa Maria, Keom, L^nidegen, Banguend, Canyvan, 
Appari, Laog, Vigan, San Juan and San Tomas. Besides participating in num- 
erous skirmishes he was subjected to other dangers equally as menacing, and 
on one occasion during the rainy season was exposed to a continuous down- 
pour, without even a temporary shelter, for twelve consecutive davs, during 
which time it was utterly impossible to obtain a change of clothing and the 
only available food was hardtack and bacon. He was twice confined to the 
hospital, once with yellow fever and at another time from the efifects of being 
poisoned by impure food. In June, 1903, his regiment was ordered home and 
he was mustered out at Angel Island, San Francisco Bay, July 23, 1903, as 
first sergeant of his company, there being but thirty-two left of the one hun- 
dred and thirty-two officers and men originally enrolled. His long sojourn in 
the islanfls enabled him to gather much interesting information concerning the 
character and mode- of life of the natives, and he also made two visits to Japan. 
Returning to Pennsylvania after his discharge from the army he entered the 
employ of the Union Supply Company of Painter, with whom he remained 
for some time, and he subsequently purchased a restaurant in Scottdale, where 
he now resides. In 1904 he established himself in the grocery business, enter- 
ing his new field of trade with a large and well-selected stock of staple and 



HISTORY OF U'ESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 217 

iancy groceries, canned goods, preserved meats, country produce, grain, leeil, 
etc. .'and he has already Taid the foundation of a successful mercantile business 
uliich promises to develop into large proportions in the near future. 

e)n February 23, 1904, Mr. Macbeth was united in marriage with Miss 
Mdna Williams, of South Huntingdon township, daughter of Daniel A. and 
Rebecca (Nichols) Williams. They have one daughter, Ruth Esther Mac- 
beth. Mr. and Mrs. Macbeth attend the Presbyterian church. 

JAMES McFADDEX CARPENTER. The family of which James 
McFadden Carpenter, of Pittsburg, is a representative, was founded in this 
countv bv Heinrich Zimmerman, who came hither about i(x)8 from the canton of 
Berne, Switzerland, and settled in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. About 1703 
lie brou.ght over his family, which was a large one, inchuling six sons, five of 
whom became surveyors and scriveners. He is said to have been much more 
progressive than his neighbors, in that he believed in educating his family 
in En.glish and in making them Americans. His wishes in this respect are 
further indicated by the fact that he translated his name and after coming to 
this country was known as Henry Carpenter. 

Danief Carpenter, one of his sons, was the father of a son also named 
Daniel. This second Daniel was the father of John Carpenter, whose son, 
Jeremiah Murrv Carpenter, was born on Pocketos (Puckety) creek, at a place 
more recently known as Hamilton's 'SUW. He received a common school 
education and in early life was a teacher. Later he became a farmer and 
also practiced the profession of a surveyor and scrivener. He held the 
office of justice of the peace, served in the militia, and in poHtics'was a 
I\-mocrat. In religious belief he was a Presbyterian and served as ruling 
elder in the Laird (Old Plum Creek) Church. His wife was Eleanor, 
daughter of James and Margaret (Stewart) McFadden, and a native of 
?vIiddletown, Washington county, Pennsylvania. To them were born six 
children: Mary Elizabeth, married James Mcjunkin : John, married Isabella 
Herron : James McFadden, Jeremiah Murry, deceased; Samuel Lease, at pres- 
ent judge of the district circuit, Denver. Colorado: who married Grace 
Boyd: and Bertha Eleanor, intermarried with William i\L McCracken. 

James McFadden. tlic third child, was born January 30, 1850. at 
Murrvsville. Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. The family removed to 
Plum township, Allegheny county, in 1852, where he received his primary 
education in the common schools, from w'hich he passed to the academy at 
Murrvsville known as Laird Institute. Wliile studyin-j for his profession he 
engaged in farming, teaching and surveying, and in October, 1874, became a 
niember of the Pittsbur.g bar, since which time he has been in active prac- 
tice. His professional experience has lain especially along the lines of min- 
ing and oil interests, and he is known as a concise and forcible speaker. In 
early life he was a Democrat, but has always been independent of merely 
l)arty considerations. Since 1896 he has been somewhat active in politics, was 
one of the organizers of the "Gold Democracy" and was a member of the 
convention that nominated Palmer and Buckner. For himself he has never 
sought election to any office. He is one of the trustees of Western Tlieo- 
lo.gical Seminary, and a member of the L'nion Club of Pittsburg. Since t88i 
he has been ruline elder in the Park Avenue Presbyterian Church of Pittslnug, 
duriuT all of which time he has served as clerk of session. Mr. Carpenter mar- 
ried. June 21. 1876. Mary II.. daughter of John L. L. and Rebekah II. Knox, of 



2i8 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTY. 

Allegheny, and their children were : Alice Lazear, Rebckah Nnox, who died . 
in her sixth year; Bertha Eleanor and James McFadden. Mrs. Carpenter died 
July 2, 1899. 

WILLIAM ELKIN, one of the best known and most influential men 
of West Jeannette, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, was born in county 
Tyrone, Ireland. Mav 2, 1850. He is the son of Hugh and Margaret (Wat- 
son) Elkin, who lived and died in Ireland and were the parents of seven 
children, three of whom survive : David, of Fayette county ; Annie, widow 
of William Lemon, of Ireland ; and William Elkin, of whom later. 

On his seventeenth birthday William Elkin left his native place and srtded 
for America shores, landing in Quebec, Canada, thence to Glenham, Dutchess 
county. New York, where he resided for four or five years, being employed dur- 
ing this time in a dyeing establishment. In 1872 he removed to Pittsburg, 
where he was employed in an iron works for fourteen years, with the exception 
of a few months spent in Wellsville, Ohio. In 1886 Mr. Elkin decided to enter 
into business for himself and accordingly opened a hotel in Pittsburg, at 1240 
Pennsvlvania avenue. He conducted this establishment for six years with con- 
siderable success, and then selling out his business removed to West Jeannette, 
where better opportunities presented themselves for an extensive and profitable 
business. Mr. Elkin established his hotel on property which he had purchased 
three vears prior to his removal to that place, and spared neither time nor labor 
to make his establishment a well-equipped and commodious house. Ever since 
the Elkin House was opened to the public it has been counted among the most 
popular and best paying hotels of that section, and the proprietor, Mr. Elkin, 
is to be congratulated on his well deserved success. As a citizen Mr. Elkm is 
held in the highest esteem by his fellow townsmen, which is demonstrated by 
the fact that lie was elected this spring to his third term as school director, and 
is counted among the most influential men of Jeannette. Mr. Elkin's political 
sympathies lie w'ith the Republican party, and" while he has never aspired to 
public office he takes a deep and lasting interest in all afYairs bearing upon the 
welfare of his town and county. He is a member of Jeannette Lodge, No. 468, 
B. P. O. E. and the Orangemen's Lodge. In religious matters he affiliates with 
the Episcopal church, and was a meriiber of the building committee during the 
construction of the church building in 1904. 

November 10, 1875, Mr. Elkin was united in marriage to Elizalieth C. 
Elkin, a native of Indiana county, daughter of Francis and Elizabeth (Pratt) 
Elkin, and a sister of John P. Elkin. Their children are: William F.. with 
. his father in the hotel business ; Lilly May, teacher in the Jeannette schools ; 
Margaret Myrtle, a teacher in Hempfield township schools ; Charles Alfred, 
reading medicine in the University of Pennsylvania ; Olive Florence : at home ; 
and Hazel Catherine, at home. 

VERY REV. M. A. LAMBING, pastor of St. John the Baptist's 
Roman Catholic Church, Scottdale, Pennsylvania, whose ancestors had come 
from Alsace and Ireland about the middle of the eighteenth century, was born 
in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, April 28, 1848. 

His boyhood and youth were spent in Manorville. in the same county. 
He quit school when thirteen years old, as his help was needed by the family, 
and learned shoemaking with his father ; but soon after left the bench for 
more lucrative employment in the oil business, working in a refinery and also 
in the Oil Creek and the Parker fields. He kept up a course of study through 





/?^.,^::7U.^. 




fpb 









HISTORY OF WESTMORELASD COUXTY. 219, 

these years and, believing he had a caU to the priesthood, entered St. Michael's 
Seminarv, Glenwood, near Pittsburg, ni the fall of 1870. He xvas ordamec 
from this institution bv Bishop Tuigg, June 10, 1876, and nnmediately assigned 
as as-;istant to the pastor of St. John's Church, Southside, Pittsburg. In l-eb- 
ruary, 1878. he was transferred to a like position in St. I'atnck s Church in 
the same citv. July 17, 1879. he was appointed to his present charge. 

Scottdaie was' originally (,1872-1878) a mission attended from Lomiells- 
ville, but in the latter vear it was made a separate parish with Rey. Thomas 
M'Enrue as its first pas'tor. It was a small church of some two dozen commu- 
nicants when placed under Father Lambing's care, but being the center of the 
coke regions, which were then opening up, it grew rapidly in numbers. The 
corner stone of the present edifice, one of the finest in that section, with a 
seating capacitv of more than four hundred, was laid in 1881. Until August, 
1887, Tie had charge of all the territory between Connellsville and St. N'incent's 
with 'a population of a dozen nationalities. During most of this time he was 
assisted bv Rev. S. T- Schramm and Rev. P. Rigler. Since tnen he has had 
charge of only the "English and German speaking Catholics in and alK)ut 
Scottdaie, assisted by Rev. A. P. Black (1901-1903) and now by Rev. P. C. 
Danner. Father Lambing erected not only his own church but also St. 
Joseph's Church, [Mount Pleasant, and tlie rectory, parish school and convent. 
Scottdaie. Seven teachers are employed in the school, which has an enrollment 
of three hundred and thirty. In 1902 he was appointed dean over Westmore- 
land. Indiana and Fayette counties by the^ate Bishop Phelan, and is known as 
rural dean: he is also a'member of impoi^it church committees of his diocese. 
A lifelong abstainer, he is a strong and «rnsistent temperance advocate, and 
one of the most widely known leaders o^th^ Catholic Total Abstinence Union 
of America, of which he has been a meM)'^!' since 1884. The total abstiiiLnce 
societies connected with his church o\^^Ji'\a.rg€ hall. Since his coming to 
Scottdaie, ten young women and four yw^g men of the parish have entered 
the religious life. Two of the young riS^, Revs. M. P. Boyle and P. Diskm, 
were ordained into the priesthood. 

Father Lambing was a prominent figure in all the labor troubles of the 
coke regions, always striving for a just and peaceful solution of disputes and 
enjoying the fullest confidence of the men regardless of nationality or creed, 
and of their employers and the public. Catholics and Protestants alike unite 
in their praise of Father Lambing for the great and good work he has accom- 
plished in the community, in the welfare of which he has always taken an 
interest and an active part. With tenacity of purpose and patient perseverance, 
never asking nor wishing a change of place, he has labored with untiring 
energy for his congregation and the moral good of the communitv. His labors 
have been labors of love and well done; his greatest pleasure is his Master's 
service and the betterment of his fellowmen. His work is a credit to himself 
and an honor to his church. 

:vrAHLOX M. STANTZ. One of the old Pennsylvania families of 
German orisrin is that represented by Mahlon M. Stantz. of .Scottdaie. Tlie 
first ancestor of whom we have any knowledge was Jacob Stantz (or .Stautz, 
as the name was originally spelled) who came from Franklin county to ^^'est- 
moreland county about a ccnturv ago. It has not been asrertained whether he 
was the progenitor who emigrated from Germany or whether he was of Amer- 
ican birth. 

Jacob Stantz was a blacksmith hy trade and a first-class meclianic. On his 



220 HISTORY or WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

arrival in Westmoreland county he settled on the "i'vindif^ farm," in Mount 
Pleasant township, and later moved to South Huntingdon townshij), near Men- 
den, where he passed the remainder of his life. 1 le owned a farm of one hun- 
dred and twenty acres which he cultivated in connection with his work as a 
l)lacksmith. Me was a memher of the Lutheran church. Mr. Stantz married 
Susannah Miller, and tiiey wxtc the jiarents of the following children; Jolm 
who was a farmer, and moved to ( )hio. Leonard, who was a lahorer, and went 
to Clarion county, Pennsylvania. Jacob, died in early life. Christopher, men- 
tioned hereafter. Henry, who was a farmer, and died nu the homestead. I'hili]) 
-\vho was a farmer in .South Huntingdon townshi)). Isaac, who enlisted in the 
■army during the Civil war and died of disease contracted while in service. 
Peter, who also served in the army and died of wounds received in battle. A 
daughter who became the wife of Ceorge Painter, of Westmoreland county. 
Polh . died inimarried. Catharine, ni,-irried .Samuel McMiehael, of Westmore- 
land countv. Mr. Stantz, the lather, lived to be well advanced in years, his 
death occurring when he was upward of eighty. 

Christopher Stantz, son of Jacob and Susannah (Miller) Stantz, was born 
Jul\-, \Hi2, in Moimt Pleasant township, and in early life was a teamster, for 
iifteen years driving a team between Tudtimore, i'hiladelphia and Pittsburg. 
I'l'om ii^39 to the end of his life he lived in South llnnlingdon township, where 
he engaged in the labors of a farmer. He was a member of the Lutheran 
church. Mr. Stantz was twice married. His first wife was Jane McAfee, who 
bore him three children: Jemima; Mary R., who became the wife of L. K. 
Hixson, of Alverton ; and Emmanuel M., mentioned hereafter. After the 
death of his wife Mr. Stantz married Catharine, widow of Philip Heck and 
<laughter of Andrew i\\erly. Mr. .Si.-uitz died in iSi>7, at Ihe .■idvanced age of 
■eighty-five years. 

luiimanuel M. Stantz, son of Christopher and Jane (McAfee) Stantz, 
-was born February 20, 1842, reared on the farm, and received his education in 
the public schools. He remained at home until he had passed his majority, and 
m 1870 had the misfortune to lo.se his right hand in a clover-seed huller, after 
which lie secured a position as stable boss for the firm of Brown & Coughran, 
coal miners. He filled this position for nine years and tlien retired to the farm 
where he remained from 1880 to 1895, when he removed to Scottdale which is 
liis present ])lacc of aliode. The family belong to the llnitcd liajitist church. 
Mr. Stantz married, .April 4, 1867, Calliarine, (laughter of Michael and Nancy 
(Fretts) Myers, and the following children Jiave been born to them: Jennie, 
died at the age of eighteen years. Mahlon M.. mentioned hereafter. Millie, 
who became the wife of W. H. I>ynn, and is ikiw deee.-ised. I'dla, married John 
Medsgar, of Charleroi, Pennsylvania. Florence, ;il home. Penjaniin \\, ;it 
Iiome. Ruth, at home. 

Mahlon M. Stantz, .son of F.mmanuel M. and Catharine (Myers) Stantz, 
was born September 12, 1869, educated in the public schools, and when but 
seventeen or eighteen }'ears of age began to learn Hie imtcher's trade. Fie was 
employed for about eight years in the stores of tlie U'. J. Raney Company, at 
VanderbiU. In September, iScjS, he settled in Scottdale, where he opened a 
meat mnrket and has since conducted a flourishing Inisiness. He supplies the 
trade in Scottdale and IJic suliurbs, and in addition to meat handles eggs, but- 
ter and cheese. He is a member of the Royal .Arcanum and the Modern Wood- 
men of the World. Mr. Stantz married, June =;, i8()5, inorence, daughter of 
Henry and Mary Snyder. Mrs. St;intz is a native of hjisl Lilierty, Fayette 
county, Pennsylvania. 



" HISTORY OF JVESTMORELAXD COUXTV. 221 

R.\LPH B. KUHXS, a representative business man of Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, was born October 18, 1878, seven or eight miles south of 
the borough of Greensburg, and is tne son of \\'. H. and Mary (.Kalp) Kuhns, 
who are now residents of Fa}ette county, Pennsylvania. W. H. Kuhns was born, 
in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, in 1849. ^^ ^^'^s formerly engaged in the 
lumber business and also in the conduct of several saw mills. He is now em- 
ployed by the H. C. Frick Coke Company in Fayette county. In the year 1877 
he married Man." Kalp, and they are the parents of the following named chil- 
dren: Anna, wife of A. J. Brothers, of Fayette county; Ora. married Frank 
Greenwalt. of Fayette county ; Olive, unmarried ; Ida, wife of Charles Bush, of 
Westmoreland countv ; Elsie, at home : Sadie, at home ; Walter, at home ; and 
Ralph. 

At the age of six years Ralph B. Kuhns removed with his parents to Fay- 
ette county, near Laurelville. There he received his early education in the 
pubhc schools, and later took a course in the Iron City Business College of Pitts- 
burg. (1899-1900). After his graduation in 1900 he secured a position as 
clerk in the Union Supplv Company's store, and remained with them for nine 
months. At the expiration of this time he entered the employ of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company as clerk in the scale office at Young^vood, Pennsyl- 
vania. His next removal was to Everson. where he was employed as store- 
keeper for the same company. This position he retained from Februar\- until 
August, when he was transferred to Young^vood, remaining there until Augtist 
of the following year. He then went to Edenborn as shipping clerk for H. C. 
Frick Coke Company, and at the end of a year was transferred to Sterling Xo. 
2, same companv, as paymaster, continuing in this capacity until the works were 
closed up. October 22, 1903. he entered the employ of the United States Cast 
Iron Pipe & Foundry Company at Scoltdale, as shipping clerk. He was soon 
promoted to bill and order clerk, which position he held until he engaged in his 
present business, April i, 1905. 

;Mr. Kuhns purchased the bakerv- establishment at 228 Pittsburg street, 
Scottdale. Pennsylvania. March 31, 1905, and one day later took possession, 
succeeding Mrs. C. M. Frey. This business was established in 1885 by George 
P. Frey, who conducted it until his death, about 1899. when his wife took pos- 
session and carried on the business until her death in 1905. It is the intention 
of Mr. Kuhns to conduct the business along the same lines which were formerly 
followed. Besides a general bakerv and catering business, he also has an ice- 
cream parlor, which is one of the leading features of the establishment. A com- 
modious and attractive room in the rear of the apartment is devoted to this pur- 
pose, and in the winter seasons is used as an oyster and lunch room, being the 
only one of its kind in the borough. Mr. Kuhns manufactures his own cream, 
doing a wholesale as well as a retail business, his trade covering a large ter- 
ritory-. \\'hen the Spanish-American war broke out. Mr. Kuhns enlisted, April 
1898. in Company E. Tenth Pennsylvania \"olunteer Infantry. He served in 
the Philippines, and saw much active service, visiting the towns of Manila, 
Ca\-iti. ^ialalos. Malabaao and many others of prominence. Fraternally Mr. 
Kuhns is a m.ember of the Modern W'oodmen of America. October 12, 1901,. 
he was united in marriage to Elizabeth Becker, daughter of Peter J. and Eliza- 
beth Becker, who are natives of Scottdale. They have two children : Lillian 
and Florence. Mr. Kuhns and his family have their residence on Pittsburg 
street, near his place of business. 

JAMES BE^^TA^^X FRAXKLIX SMITH. One of the leading 
merchants of Mount Pleasant is James Benjamin Franklin Smith. He is a- 



.222 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



grandson of Joseph Smith, whose son, David G. Smith, was born near Gettys- 
burg, Adams county, Pennsylvania, and at the age of fifteen or sixteen came 
-to Westmoreland county. He there found employment in the Hurst settlement 
in Mount Pleasant tow'nship, and remained in this vicinity for several years. 
He then went to what is known as Painterville, where he was employed for 
-twelve vears in the salt works, and at the end of that time engaged in mercan- 
tile business at New Stanton, now known as Old Stanton. He married Mary, 
daughter of Joseph Bear, a farmer of Sewickley township, and they were the 
parents of a son, James Benjamin Franklin, mentioned hereafter. The death of 
-Mr. Smith occurred in December, 1888. He was a good business man and a 
■•worthy citizen. 

James Benjamin Franklin Smith, son of David G. and Mary (Bear) 
Smith, was born January 24, 1867, and received his education in the public 
■schools and at the Greensburg Seminary. In the autumn of 1884, while still 
but a lad, he became a teacher, and taught four terms in Hempfiekl township. 
After four years as a teacher, he went as store manager to the Alice mines, 
near Mount Pleasant, Ea.st Huntingdon township, and held this position four- 
teen years, although during that period the concern changed hands no fewer 
than five different times. In 1900 the Mount Pleasant Supply Company, by 
whom he was then employed, transferred him to the Klondike coal field in Fay- 
ette county, there to become the manager of a store. After holding this posi- 
tion ten months he resigned and entered the service of the American Supply 
'Company, as manager of their store at Edenboro. At the end of three months 
the same company transferred him to Lambert, where he opened a store for 
them, and after getting the establishment into good running order he was agaUi 
transferred to Gates, Pennsylvania, to open a store there. At this place he was 
retained for eight months, and in 1902, when the American Supply Company 
consolidated with the Union Supply Company, he resigned and entered the ser- 
vice of the Sharon Steel Company, as manager and purchasing agent of the 
store at Ronco, Pennsylvania. This position he filled until April, 1903, when 
he resigned, went to Mount Pleasant and there purchased the dry goods estab- 
lishment of James S. Braddock & Company, which he has since conducted and 
maintained as one of the leading dry goods stores of the borough. He is a 
progressive business man, and the strict attention which he gives to the afifairb 
of his establishment leaves him little time for social enjoyment, but he is a 
worthy member of the I. O. O. F. and the Modern Woodmen. He and his 
family are members of the First Reformed church of ]Mount Pleasant. 

Mr. Smith married. May 28, 1888, Alice G., daughter of B. F: and Nancy 
S. (McCain) Miller, of New Stanton, and they have four children: Mamie 
Marie, Anna Gertrude, Benjamin F., deceased, and James Edward. Mr. Smith 
is strictly and absolutelv a self-made man of whom it may be truly said that he 
has been the maker of his own fortune, and throughout his career has set an 
example of total abstinence, refraining not onlv from intoxicating liquors, but 
also from the use of tobacco in every form. 

A. N. SHUSTER, a prominent real estate and insurance dealer in 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, was born in Penn township, near Boquet, 
May 12. 187.3, the son of Israel and Mary (Kepple) Shuster. His mother is 
deceased, and his father is a farmer in Penn township. A. N. Shuster acquired 
his education in the public schools of his native place, and at the age of sixteen 
left school and entered into his first regular employment as clerk for Ed Fry, 
at Boquet, which position he held for five years. He then moved to Charleroi, 



HISTORY OF irESTMORELAXD COUXTV. 223 

where he acted as head clerk for J. E. AlcCardle for three years. He went to 
Mnncssen in October. 1897, becoming one of the pioneer settlers in that town. 
At the time of his arrival there were hut three families in residence there, and 
he and his brother John ojiened a general store, the first of its kind in the place. 
Thev conducted the business very successfully under the firm name of Shuster 
Brothers for five years, when they sold it to the Geer Brothers. During the 
succeeding year they engaged in the conduct of a feed and livery business, and 
at the end of the year Mr. A. N. Shuster went on a trip to California. Upon 
his return he organized a stock company and erected the Monessen Opera 
House at a cost of $45,000, and of this Mr. Shuster has since been manager and 
director. He was also one of the organizers of the IMonessen Savings and 
Trust Company, of Monessen, of which he is now a member of the board of 
directors. In May, 1905, he formed a partnership with Milton Loeb, and 
established a real estate and insurance business, which they conduct under the 
firm name of Shuster and Loeb. They also conduct a fire insurance business. 
In this line they represent the Allegheny Insurance Company: the Western of 
Toronto; the S. \'. E. A. of Gothenburg, Sweden: and the London, Liverpool 
and Globe Insurance Companies. 

Mr. Shuster has always been actively identified with all public aftairs, and 
was one of the first councilmen elected in the borough, serving for three years. 
He was elected on the Democratic ticket, and in 1903 was elected burgess on 
the Republican ticket. He has served as a member of the Republican County 
Convention for the past three years. Fraternally he is a member of the B. P. O. 
£.. and one of the organizers of the Alonessen Lodge, Xo. J/T, : he was made a 
member of the Elks in Charleroi : he was one of the charter members of the K. 
P., Monessen Lodge : and also one of the charter members of the German Ben- 
eficial L'nion. He has contributed his share toward the upbuilding of the thriv- 
ing borough, and erected the building occupied by Greer Brothers, on Schoon- 
maker avenue, which is forty-four by one hundred feet. Mr. Shuster married, 
March 26, 1898, Bessie McFeely, daughter of Scott and Anna McFeely, of 
Monongahela, Pennsylvania. They have three children : Prather, Rudell and 
Catharine, deceased. They are members of the Presbyterian church. 

ADAM T. DARR. Among the reliable business men of West New- 
ton. Pennsylvania, is Adam T. Darr, born at the borough just named, Febru- 
ary 22. 1840, son of G. Adam and Christena (Kolbe) Darr, both natives of 
Germany. 

The father was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, about 1804, and died at 
West Newton, Pennsylvania, April 30, 1879. He learned the trade of car- 
penter, and later emigrated to .-Kmerica, landing at Baltimore, Maryland, about 
1826. After a short sojourn in that city, he went to Mount Pleasant, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, where he followed his trade a short time and 
then removed to South Huntingdon town.ship of this county, and later to Ros- 
traver township. Subsequently he moved to the borough of West Newton, 
where he followed carpentering and building the rcmainrler of Iiis life, dving 
in 1879. His wife survived him until 1884. Botli are buried in the old West 
Newton cemetery. The children born to G. .Aflam and Christena f Kolbe) Darr 
were as follows : The first two died young — one at sea while sailing for 
America. 3. Catherine, born in Germany, married Christian Olbey : she is now 
a widow residing in Kansas. 4. Henry, died 1872. 5. John C, now of Em- 
poria. Kansas,a farmer by occupation : he served during the Civil war as a mem- 
ber of the Ninety-sixth Illinois Infantry Regiment for three years. 6. Marv, 



224 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

now residing at the old Darr honicEtend in West Newton, Pennsylvania. 7. Adam 
T., born February 22, 1840, at West Newton. 8. Daniel F., a carpenter of West ■ 
Newton, who was a member of the Eighth Pennsylvania Reserves in time of 
the rebellion and served faithfullv for three years. 9. Lucetta C, married John 
Oldbey, of West Newton. G. Adam Darr and wife were exemplary members 
of the United Brethren church, and in politics he was a supporter of the 
Republican party. 

Adam T. Darr obtained a good common school education at West New- 
ton, and when twenty-two years of age, August 22, 1862, he enlisted as a 
private in Company F, One Hundred and Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania Regiment of 
Infantry, serving in the Union cause within the Army of the Potomac until 
the close of the great civil war, being honorably discharged June 29, 1865. 
May 3, 1863, he was seriously wounded at the memorable battle of Chancellors- 
ville, and was in the hospital at Washington and later at Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. After having sufficiently recovered to enter into active service he again 
joined his old command, and remained a true soldier until the close of the great 
conflict. Upon his return from the army, having seen much hard' service, he 
resumed the peaceful calling of a civilian by taking up the trade of a carpenter 
and builder, in which he continued until about 1890, when he was appointed to 
the office of postmaster at West Newton by President Benjamin Harrison, 
serving for four years. In a year or two after retiring from the duties of post- 
master Mr. Darr engaged in the real estate and insurance business, which he 
still follows in a successful manner. He is, and ever has been, a staunch sup- 
porter of the principles of the Republican party, and has been honored with 
many local offices, including that of assessor, tax-collector, borough councilman 
and member of the Republican county committee. Since 1894 he has been 
secretary and trustee of the West Newton Cemetery Association, and from 
1898 has been the secretary of the West Newton Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and has been on 
the official board and trustee and treasurer of the West Newton Methodist 
Church. Among the various civic and fraternal societies to which he has be- 
longed, he is now identified with the Masonic order, being a member of Blythe 
Lodge, No. 593, at West Newton ; Chapter No. 282, of McKeesport, Penn- 
sylvania : Lodge No. 440, I. O. O. F., at West Newton ; Royal Arcanum, No. 
65, and J. C. Markle Grand Army Post, No. 623, of West Newton. 

Mr. Darr married April 30, 1872, at Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, Mary 
Frances Luker, daughter of David and Harriet Luker. The father of Mrs. 
Darr is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. David Luker had children : B. F., a merchant 
of Kittanning. Captain J. Frank, a steamboat captain. Jennie A., wife of 
J. P. Hamilton: she is deceased. Mary Frances, wife of Adam T. Darr. Sadie 
deceased. D. W., now of Allegheny City, Pennsylvania. Amy E., at home in 
Allegheny City. 

IRA B. SCHOAF, D. D. S., of West Newton, traces his ancestry to 
Conrad and Louise (Islie) Schoaf, natives of Wurtemberg, Germany, where 
the former engaged in the occupations of shoemaking and farming. They 
were hard-working, persevering and industrious people, characteristics for 
which their countrymen and women are noted, and they set an example well 
worthy of emulation. Their death occurred in Germany in 1856 and 1839, 
respectively. 

Jacob Schoaf, son of Conrad and Louise (Islie) Shoaf, was born 
in Wurtemberg, Germany, November 24, 1819. In 1848, at the age of twenty- 



HISTORY OF iniSTMOKHL.-lXD COUXTV. 



nine vears, he emigrated to the United States, settling in \\'est Newton, West- 
moreland comity, Pennsylvania'. His first occupation was in a stone quarry, 
after which he worked as a common laborer for Jacob Baughman for a period 
of four vears, and then secured employment in a tannery, where he remained 
for twenty years. In 1875 he purchased the foundry belonging to a Mr. 
Downs, which he conducted with a large degree of success for many years, and 
his integrity and trustworthiness gained for him an enviable reputation in busi- 
ness circles. He was the owner of several valuable pieces of property in West 
Xewton, including several tine residences. He served as a member of the 
borou,gh council, having been elected on the Republican ticket. On August 9, 
1849, lie married Lena Shively, of South Huntingdon township, and their 
children were as follows: Elizabeth, John W., Frederick, Lena, and Kate. 

Frederick Schoaf, son of Jacob and Lena (Shively) Schoaf, was born in 
West Xewton, Pennsylvania, 1859. O" attaining young manhood he entered 
his father's foundry and later became a partner in the business. Subsequently 
his father withdrew from the firm and the business was left entirely in his 
hands, he conducting the same in a creditable manner for a number of years, 
when he turned his attention to the hardware business, and a few years later 
disposed of his interest in the foundry. He is one of the leading merchants of 
West Xewton, his trade being the largest and best in that line, and being 
accommodating, pleasant and reliable is highly esteemed by his many customers 
and patrons. He is a Republican in politics, a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, and a member of the L O. O. F. He served for a number of 
years as a member of the school board of \\'est X'^ewton. He married Agnes 
Willard, who bore him six children, five of whom survive : Ira B.. of whom 
later : Frederick, who is attending DufT Bros. College, Pittsburg ; Clarence, 
Ralph, and Mable. 

Ira B. Schoaf was born in West Newton, Westmoreland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, April 6, 1883 . His early education was acquired in the common schools 
of his birthplace, and later he pursued advanced studies in the academy of the 
same place. In the fall of 1901 he entered the Dental Department of the 
Western University of Pennsylvania, at Pittsburg, from which he was gradu- 
ated in the spring of 1904. After his graduation he returned to West Xew- 
ton and opened a commodious office for the practice of his profession, and in 
the short space of one year has built up an extensive and remunerative busi- 
ness. He is an expert operator, thorough in all the departments of his work, 
and is recognized as an able, skillful and progressive member of the profes- 
sion. He is a member of the Methodist Episcojjal church, and a Republican in 
politics. Dr. Schoaf is unmarried and resides with his parents. 

JAMES P. SWAUGER, a resident of West Xewton, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, proprietor of the Yough Hotel, and a man largely inter- 
ested in community afifairs, was born in Clarksburg, Indiana county, Pennsyl- 
vania, Xovember 5, 1845, son of Samuel and Catherine (Pepple) Swauger, 
and grandson of \\'illiam Swauger, who was a native of Germany, and by trade 
a miller. He died in 1821, and his widow married a Mr. Stuck, who was also 
a miller. 

Samuel Swauger. son of William Swauger, and father of James P. 
Swauger, was born in Bedford county, April 9. 1812. He learned the trade of 
miller from his step-father, followed that occupation during his active working 
life, and was engaged at his trade in Bedford, Westmoreland and Indiana 
counties. In politics he was a Democrat, and a member of the Prcsbvterian 



226 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

church. He married Catherine Pepple, born in Bedford county, April, 1814, 
and fourteen children were born to them, eight of whom survive: John, at 
Murrysville, Pennsylvania : William, at Derry Station ; James P., of whom 
later; Samuel T., at Coldport, Pennsylvania; A. Wilson, at Murrysville; 
George, at Saltsburg ; Margaret, wife of Porter J. Nesbit, Aledo, Illinois ; and 
Catherine, wife of George Stark, Salem Cross Roads. The father of these 
children died at the age of eighty-two years. 

Tames P. Swauger obtained his education in the common schools of his 
native ijlace, and early in life learned the trade of miller under the instruction 
of his father. He was engaged in this occupation for about a quarter of a 
centurv, and was a skilled miller in both the old burr and later the roller sys- 
tem. In 1889 Mr. Swauger retired from the milling business and engaged in 
the hotel business in West Newton, where he has since been located. The 
Yough hotel, of which Mr. Swauger is the proprietor, is a first-class establish- 
ment, and is well patronized. He has won many friends among his guests, 
owing to his genial and hospitable disposition. Politically he is a strong 
Republican, and is a firm advocate of the principles of that organization. In 
1 87 1 he married Edith Fisher, daughter of Adam Fisher, of Confluence, 
Pennsylvania. This marriage ceremony was culminated in Maryland, where 
Mr. Swauger resided for about eleven years during young manhood. Their 
children are : Blanche, resides in Pittsburg, wife of John F. Cummings, who 
is with the Baltimore and Ohio railroad ; Ida, at home ; and Mazie, who lives 
with Mrs. G. M. Emig, of Pittsburg, by whom she was reared. Mrs. Swauger 
died in 1878, and in 1882 Mr. Swauger married Margaret Frye, of Indiana 
county, daughter of Joseph Frve, now of Blairsville, Pennsylvania. Their 
children are : Ethel, w"ife of E. G. Shepler, Monessen : Grace, Nellie, Ruth and 
John, all of whom reside at home. 

S. F. TODD, an esteemed resident of Scottdale, Westmoreland 
countv, Pennsylvania, and a man who by his own exertion and perseverence 
has attained an honorable place in the world of successful business men, is 
the son of Daniel and Elizabeth (Merritt) Todd, and was born in Rostraver, 
Westmoreland countv, October 11, 1852. The Todd family in America orig- 
inated with Robert Todd, a native of Brittania, France, a captain in the home 
guards, who at the overthrow of the government at the time of the insurrection 
hastened from his native land, finding a haven in America. He lived and died 
in Lancaster countv, Pennsvlvania. "He had one son, Robert, the grandfather 
of S. F. Todd. 

Robert Todd removed from Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, to Rostraver, 
Westmoreland county, in 1779. He settled on a farm located a mile and a half 
east of Rostraver postofifice, and which is now owned by his grandson, Robert 
Todd. When he took possession of the property it was a wild tract of land, 
but he carefully improved it, and brought it to a high state of cultivation. He 
followed agricultural pursuits in conjunction with the conduct of a tannery 
all his active working life, and achieved the most gratifying success. He 
affiliated with the order of Quakers. His wife was Hannah Hammond, a native 
of France, bv whom were born the following named children: Hannah, 
deceased: Polly, who became the wife of Peter Van Meter, a Frenchman; 
Margaret, married John Foot, of old Connecticut extraction ; Ann. marrried 
John Hasson ; Robert, a farmer of Rostraver township ; Daniel, father of S. 
F. Todd ; Samuel, a farmer of Rostraver township ; James, formerly a steam- 
boat captain, later a merchant. The father of these children, Robert Todd, 





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HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTV. 227 

died in 1821, at the age of fifty-eight years. He was a useful, industrious 
citizen, a kind and loving- father and hushand, and his loss was keenly felt. 

Daniel Todd, sixth child and second son of Robert and Hannah (Ham- 
mond) Todd, was born in 1808, in Rostraver township. He obtained his edu- 
cation in the common schools and the old Concord school house, and upon 
leaving school turned his attention to the quiet but useful occupation of a 
farmer. In 1847 he removed to .South Huntingdon township, where he 
engaged in the cultivation of a splendid farm of one hundred and ninety-two 
acres. He was a regular and consistent member of the jMethodist Episcopal 
church. He married Elizabeth Merritt, a daughter of Jonathan and Mary 
(Harrold) Merritt. Seven children, three sons and four daughters, were the 
issue of this marriage union : Hannah, deceased, the wife of Oliver Lenliart ; 
S. F., mentioned hereafter ; Daniel, deceased : James, died in youth : Elizabeth, 
the wife of Hugh Espev, of East Huntingdon township ; Laura, who married 
Robert Hill, of Scottdale. Daniel Todd died in 1863. 

S. F. Todd received his intellectual training in the public schools and 
Normal school, spending two terms in the latter. After the death of his father 
he took up his residence with his uncle, Samuel Todd, and when a young man 
made a trip to the west, remaining there for two years. He then returned to 
South Huntingdon township and followed agricultural pursuits until 1886, 
when he removed to Scottdale and worked in the roUintr-mill and clerked in 
stores until 1891. when he embarked upon his present successful business 
enterprise. His present business is that of a stone, marble and granite dealer. 
His is one of the leading and substantial establishments in the county. He 
deals in monuments of all kinds, from the smallest tombstone to the finest 
mausoleum. His place of business is at 211 South Broadway. Mr. Todd 
contracts for the erection of stone buildings, and at times employs as many as 
twenty men. In 1901 he erected one of the most attractive modern houses in 
Scottdale, made of Cleveland stone, and situated on South Broadway, where he 
and his niece reside in comfort and luxury. 

Politically Mr. Todd strongly defends the principles of the Democratic 
partv. Public-spirited and patriotic, he is deeply interested in all public affairs 
and always has the best interests of the community at heart. He has taken 
pride in the upbuilding and growth of his town, and is ever ready to lend his 
assistance to any enterprise which will advance the interests of the public. In 
the fall of 1904 he was strongly solicited by members of his party to become 
a candidate for county comptroller, but declined. He has served as a member 
of the borough council, and during his visit to Florida was placed on the 
borough ticket for burgess. He returned four days before election, and his 
popularity was such that he came w'ithin sixteen votes of being elected in a 
district strongly Republican. An upright, honorable man, Mr. Todd enjoys 
the entire confidence of the community. He has never married. During his 
mother's life he felt that she needed his support, and after her death he took 
care of his sister. Since her marriage he has cared for his niece, Laura, the 
daughter of Mrs. Lenhart and an accomplished young woman. 

EDW'.ARD MTLF.S FRYE, a prominent and influential citizen of 
Monessen, Pennsylvania, and postmaster of that borough, was born at Grape- 
ville. Hempfield township, ^^'estmoreland countv, Pennsylvania, July 3, 1862, 
the son of Samuel and Margaret (Branthooer) Fryc. ancl is of German origin. 
The progenitor of this familv in .America was the paternal great-grandfather of 
Edward M.. who emigrated to this country from Germanv, and engaged in 
school teaching, also instructing in singing and German. 



228 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. ' 

Samuel, the father of Edward AI. Frye, was born on the old homestead, 
at Delmont,' Pennsylvania. In early life he was a contractor and builder of 
houses and 'barns, but later gave his whole attention to agricultural pursuits. 
He was a member of the Reformed church. Samuel and Margaret (Brantho- 
over) Frye had children: Susan J., married Zephaniah Painter, of Salem 
township; W. John, of Grapeville ; Edward M., mentioned hereafter; Elmer 
Ellsworth, a packer, of jeannette ; Robert P., died at the age of two years ; 
Hettie deceased, wife of John McCurdy ; Mary Ann, married E. Allwme ; 
Clara ' wife of W. J. Duncan, of Harmony ; Sallie Agnes, married William 
Allwiiie, of Jeannette ; Nannie, wife of W. H. Steiner, of Grapeville ; Samuel 
P., of Jeannette, Pa., and one who died in infancy. The father of the above 
mentioned children was a soldier in the war of the rebellion. His death occur- 
red in March, 1905, and his wife died in December, 1904. 

Edward M. Frye acquired his early intellectual training in the public 
schools of his native place, and later attended Delmont Academy two terms ; 
Dayton Academv one term ; Cavode Academy one term, and Grove City Col- 
lege two years, 'Mr. Frye worked his way through the last named institutions, 
teaching during the winter seasons, and studying in summer, from the time 
he was nineteen until he was twenty-six years of age. September 24, 1888, he 
entered into partnership with a Mr. Painter, in Boquet, Pennsylvania, engag- 
ing in the general merchandise business. This arrangement existed for one 
year, when Mr. Frye purchased the interest of his partner, and conducted the 
business alone until March i, 1899, when he removed to Monessen and opened 
a shoe store. This he carried on with considerable success for eighteen 
months, and then sold out and formed a partnership with John W. Manown, 
establishing a real estate and insurance business. At the end of a year he pur- 
chase his partner's interest, and conducted the business alone in East 
Monessen. until March I, 1905, achieving the most gratifying success. In 
political affiliations he is a supporter of the Republican party, and has held 
many elective offices in his borough. March i, 1905, he was appointed post- 
master of Monessen, in the duties of which position he is now engaged. He 
was elected borough treasurer in 1900, and occupied this office for five years. 
He has served as a member of the county committee for the past fifteen years, 
and has also served as delegate to the state convention. Fraternally he is a 
member of the F. and A. M., Monessen Lodge, No. 638, Monongahela City 
Chapter, No. 249, R. A. ; B. P. O. E., No. 773, of which he has been secretary 
since 1904; K. P., No. 176; I. O. O. F., Monessen Lodge; Modern Woodmen 
of America and Foresters. He is a director of the First National Bank of 
Monessen, and is a member and one of the trustees of the Presbyterian church. 
Edward M. Frve married. May 13, 1890, Emaline S. Snyder, daughter of 
David and Mary (Cline) Snyder. They have three children: Ralph W., 
Wavne V. and Irene M. 

G. FRANK WRIGHT, undertaker, embalmer, and furniture dealer, 
of Monessen, Pennsylvania, was born February 19, 1876, at Dawson, Fayette 
county, Pennsylvania, a son of Robert H. and Elizabeth E. Wright, and a 
grandson of John W. Wright. 

John W. Wright was born near Washington City, where he lived until 
his earlv manhood, when he located in Fayette county and engaged in farming. 
He died at the age of seventy-six years. He was a church member and a 
consistent Christian, a man well liked and respected, although of a retiring 
disposition. 



HISTORY OF ]VESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 229 

Robert H. Wright, father of G. Frank Wright and a son of John W. and 
Susan (Patterson) \\'right. is a resident of Dawson, Pennsylvania. He is now 
retired from business. He married EHzabeth McBride, by wliom he had five 
children, three of whom are living, namely : G. Frank ; 2vlargaret, at home, 
and Eva at home. 

G. Frank Wright acquired his education at the public schools of his native 
place and the normal school at California, Pennsylvania. He learned his pres- 
ent business with his uncle, ^Ir. Murphy, of jMurphy and Company, Scottdale, 
with whom he was employed for thirteen years in the undertaking department 
of their establishment, 'ilr. Wright located at ]\Ionesscn. December 5, 1902, 
where he succeeded to the undertaking business of ]\Ic^lahan and McMahan, 
located on Fifth street. This establishment was not in a flourishing condition 
when 'Sir. Wright took charge of it, but he continued at that stand for eigh- 
teen months, the business constantly enlarging, and then removed to his 
present spacious quarters on Donner avenue, in October, 1904. In the furni- 
ture department he handles carpets, curtains, window shades, etc., and has 
extended his trade beyond the confines of the one town into the neighboring 
boroughs. The undertaking department is complete in every detail, and Mr. 
Wright has taken courses in embalming at the United States Embalming 
School and at instruction schools in New York and Chicago. In his social 
relations he is a member of the F. and A. M., IMonessen Lodge; Pittsburg 
Consistor}- ; B. P. O. E., Monessen Lodge, No. 773 ; and K. P.. Monessen 
Lodge. Mr. Wright married. October 12, 1904, Gertrude McGill, daughter 
of George C. McGill, of Dawson, Pennsylvania. 

MICHAEL E. HALLIMAN, real estate dealer and insurance man, 
was born December 11, 1880, in Columbiana county, Ohio, a son of Martin 
and Mary E. (Gorman) Halliman. The father, a resident of New Brighton, 
was born near Olean, New York, a son of Michael and Anna Halliman, born 
natives of Ireland, who came to this country^ and settled on a farm in New 
York State. He was a machinist in early life, latterly a master mechanic with 
the Kennedy Company, keg manufacturers, of New Brighton. 

Michael E. Halliman was reared in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, and edu- 
cated in the public schools of Beaver Falls. At the age of thirteen years he 
entered the employ of the Carnegie Steel Company at Beaver Falls as office 
boy, and advanced through various departments, remaining through the 
changes of management until he reached the position of assistant payma.ster. 
The plant was tlien purchased by the American Steel and Wire Companv, 
and he remained with them until they closed the Beaver Falls plant, when he 
was transferred to the Twentieth .street works at Pittsburg, and for one year 
worked for them as paymaster. He then was engaged as foreman of the 
rivet department by the Oliver Iron and Steel Company of Pittsburg, remain- 
ing with that company until 1900. He then came to ^Tonessen as paymaster 
of the local plant of the Paige Wire Fence Company and held that position 
until March 7. 1905. when he resigned to take up the real estate and insurance 
business. His office is at No. 519 Schoonmaker avenue, previously occupied 
by E. M. Frye, to whose busmess Mr. Halliman succeeded. In connection 
with his real estate business he does a general insurance business, being the 
representative of eight fire insurance companies, both foreign and domestic, 
one life insurance company, the New York Life, and two casualty companies. 
He is also a notar\' public, and is a stockholder in the Savings and Trust 
Company of Monessen, one of its original stockholders. For a time he was 



230 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

a stockholder in the Paige Wire Fence Company of Monessen, but has recently 
sold his holdings in that concern. In local affairs he has been an active worker 
for the public good, in politics an ardent Republican, and is one of the best 
known but most unassuming citizens of the town. He is a member of B. P. 
O. E., Monessen Lodge, No. 773, of the K. C, and of a Batchelors' Club of 
Monessen. 

SAMUEL JONES, of Belle Vernon, a dealer in lumber and building 
material of all kinds, also a contractor and builder, conducting his operations 
at Monessen and Belle Vernon, Pennsylvania, was born on a farm in Rostraver 
township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, June 15, 1857, a son of William 
and Sarah Jones. 

His early eucation was obtained in the common schools, and this was 
supplemented by a course in the Dufif Business College, and in the Allegheny 
high school, which he attended several terms. After completing his studies 
he associated himself with his father in the lumber business at Belle Vernon, 
beginning in 1885 and continuing until 1891, when he opened yards at Chaleroi, 
Pennsylvania, conducting business there for three years. After disposing of 
the same he devoted his attention to the business at Belle Vernon, known as 
the Belle Vernon Planing Mill Company, up to 1897, when the town of Mo- 
nessen was started. He jmrchased the first lots that were sold in that town, and 
from its very inception has been active in all the building operations therein. 
He established the first lumber yards in Monessen, 1897, and has contiimed 
to conduct the same ever since, it being known as the Monessen Lumber 
Company. He has been engaged in the contracting and building business for 
the last two decades, and has done as much if not more than any one other man 
in the building up of the town of Monessen. In 1901, in company with his 
brother, J. S. Jones, of Belle Vernon, he opened up McMahon, a second addi- 
tion to Monessen, comprising twenty acres, which they platted and sold, and 
which proved a most lucrative investment. He was associated with three 
other men in the organization of and platting of the Erent Land Company's 
plat, an addition to Monessen, comprising forty acres. This company, which 
was organized in 1905, is composed of the following members : Samuel Jones, 
president ; George Nash, J. S. Jones and C. F. Eggers. He is also interested 
in the Perry Manufacturing Company of Perryopolis, Fayette county, Penn- 
sylvania, which was organized in 1905 for the purpose of manufacturing plas- 
tering and brick making materials, also shippers of a fine grade of silica clay. 
The esteem in which he is held by his fellow citizens is evidenced by the fact 
that he was chosen to serve on the directorate of the Monessen Savings & Trust 
Company, of which he was one of the organizers. He is a stockholder in the 
Valley Deposit & Trust Company of Belle Vernon. In all his business rela- 
tions he is integrity personified, and is a member of that class whose honor, en- 
terprise and social qualities give character to a community. 

Mr. Jones was married February 25, 1886, to Annie C. Murphy, daugh- 
ter of Joshua and Mary Murphy, the former of whom is deceased and the lat- 
ter a. resident of Belle Vernon, Westmoreland county, Pennnsylvania. Mr. 
and Mrs. Jones are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. They reside 
at the corner of Vine and Broad avenue. North Belle Vernon, Pennsylvania. 

HARMER S. NEFF, of West Newton, a leading business man, who ' 
has rendered valuable service to his community in various important official 



HISTORY OP WESTMORELAND COUXTV. 231 

stations, is a native of the borough in which he now resides, born October i, 
1862. son of Reuben F. and Ann (Gressley) Neff. 

Reuben F. NefT was born in Sewickley township, Westmoreland county, a 
son of Reuben Neff, a farmer. He was' reared on the home farm, and on 
reachino- manhood engaged as a contractor in sinking coal mine shafts. Dur- 
ing the^Civil war he served faithfully and honorably for two and a half years 
in^the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, participat- 
ing in some of the most stirring campaigns and notable battles which marked 
the annals of the famous old .\rmy of the Potomac. His capability was such 
that he was marked for a lieutenancy, but this preferment was withheld from 
him through chicanerv. On his return from the army he resumed his contract 
work, but soon came to his death in the line of his duty. He had beeii re-engaged 
in this pursuit not more than three months, when he was killed while sinking a 
mine shaft at West Newton. His wife survived him many years, remaining un- 
married, and devoting herself to the service of her family, which was left in 
straitened circumstances. They were the parents of four children, i. William, 
engage;d in the stock business in Missouri : 2. Frank, resides in Stephen county, 
Kansas, where he is engaged in the stock business ; he has served as county su- 
perintendent of schools.^and is the present clerk of court. 3. Wesley, a carpenter 
at McKeesport, Pennsylvania. 4. Harmer S. All these children took employ- 
ment very early in life in order to assist their widowed mother in keeping her 
family together. 

Harmer S. Neff worked upon a farm until he was eleven years of age, and 
at fifteen, engaged with a blacksmith. His education was necessarily limited, 
but his ambition enabled him to compensate for meagre school advantages by 
directing him to the acquisition of knowledge from other sources. After black- 
smithing with A. W. Smith, at McKeesport, for a time, he took a position with 
the Markle Paper Company, in West Newton, his duties being caring for their 
machinery. He acquitted jiimself with credit in this position for several years, 
developing the capabilities of a skilled machinist, and entered the employ of 
the Osborn Seagern Coal Company, being charged with the care of the ma- 
chinery in their various mines in Pennsylvania and Ohio. In 1893 he resigned 
this position to connect himself with the National Tube Works in McKees- 
port, with the desire of entering upon a larger knowledge of a different class 
of machinery. After two years so occupied he was for a short time employed 
in the capacity of foreman in the machine shops of the Pittsburg Coal Com- 
pany, which he left to accept the position of machinist for the United States 
Radiator Company in West Newton. After two years of this employment ( in 
1902) he resigned, with an excellent record as a workman and a man, never 
once leaving a position under compulsion, but only on his own motion in order 
to enter upon a more desirable situation. His retirement from his last employ- 
ment was due to his determination to enter upon an independent career, and 
he at once opened a machine shop in West Newton, a venture in which he 
has been eminently successful, as is attested by the large and important pa- 
tronage which has been accorded him, and which is constantly increasing. He 
is actively identified with the life of the community, and his public spirit and 
capability have found cordial recognition in his election to various positions of 
usefulness. He has served one term as a member of the town council, and 
two terms as a member of the board of health, while he is at present a member 
of the school board. His religious membership is with the Methodist Episcojjal 
church, and in politics he is a Republican. He is a member of West Newton 
Lodge, No. 440, I. O. O. F. Mr. Neff married in 1882, Sadie Harned, a daugh- 



232 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



ter of William Harned, a leading- farmer of Bruston Mills, West Viro^inia. 



&' 



They have three children : Edna, Frank and Gordon. The first named is a 
graduate of the California State Normal school, and is a highly esteemed 
teacher in the West Newton public schools. 

CHRISTIAN GOEHRING. Among the leading business men of 
West Newton, whose enterprise, energy and thrift have been leading and im- 
portant factors in the material growth and development thereof, may be men- 
tioned the name of Christian Goehring, a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, 
born May 17, 1859, who possesses in a marked degree the characteristics of 
his native land. His parents, Martin and Mar}' (Hunker) Goehring, also na- 
tives of Wurtemberg, Germany, emigrated to the United States with their 
family, locating at Hunkers Station, from whence after a short stay they re- 
moved to West Newton. They are the parents of seven children, all of whom 
are living at the present time (1905) : Christian, of whom later: Martin, Jr., a 
merchant of West Newton ; Mary, wife of George Binder, of West Newton : 
John G., a druggist of West Newton, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this 
work; Frederick, engaged in the furniture business in West Newton; William, 
a dry goods merchant of West Newton ; and Anna, wife of Harry Albig, of 
West Newton. 

The common schools adjacent to his home afforded Christian Goehring 
the means of obtaining a thorough, rudimentary education which qualified him 
for an active and useful career. In 1881 he engaged in teaming, which occu- 
pation proved highly remunerative and which he followed up to 1895, a period 
of fourteen years. In connection therewith he established a livery business in 
the town of West Newton, in 1895, which has also proved very successful, and 
which is recognized as one of the leading establishments of its kind, receiving 
the patronage of the best residents of the town. It is well equipped with ve- 
hicles suitable for all occasions, and the patrons thereof receive at all times 
prompt and courteous treatment. Mr. Goehring has served as burgess of the 
town for four years, and is now (1905) a member of the town council, these 
facts attesting to his worth as a citizen. His religious views are in accord with 
those of the Lutheran church, of which he is a member, and his political alle- 
giance is given to the Democratic party. In 1882 Mr. Goehring married Lena 
Schoaf, daughter of Jacob and Lena (Shively) Schoaf, and granddaughter of 
Conrad and Louise (Islie) Schoaf, her parents, now deceased, having been 
among the early settlers of West Newton. Their children are: Harrv, a stu- 
dent in the College of Pharmacy in Pittsburg; William, engaged with his 
father in the livery business ; Paul, George, and Man,-, all of whom reside at 
home. 

FREDERICK GOEHRING, one of the lending and substantial busi- 
ness men of West Newton, Pennsylvania, was born February 21, 1871, the son 
of Martin and Mary (Hunker) Goehring, who were both natives of Wurtem- 
berg, Germany, where they were reared in humble circumstances. After their 
marriage, they emigrated to the United States, locating at Hunkers Station. 
After a short time they removed to West Newton, where thev spent the re- 
mainder of their lives. Martin Goehring was a laborer, and was variously oc- 
cupied after he came to this country. Mrs. Goehring is still living. Their 
children were: Christian, engaged in the liverv business at West Newton; 
Martin, a clerk in West Newton ; Marv, wife of George P. Buider, West New- 



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HISTORY OF IVESTMORELAXD COLWTV. 



233 



ton ; John G., a druggist ; Frederick, of whom later ; Wilhani L., a merchant ; 
and Anna. 

Frederick Goehring was reared in West Newton and acquired his educa- 
tion in the pubhc schools of that place. \\'hen twenty years of age he entered 
the employ of Frederick Schoaf in the foundry business in West Newton, re- 
maining there some eight years, and was for a short time employed in the coal 
company's store. However, Mr. Goehring decided to enter in business for 
himself, so he formed a partnership with Henry A. McLain and they estab- 
lished a furniture business. Their business increased so rapidly during the 
succeeding four years that they were obliged to remove to more commodious 
quarters. They established themselves in the Weimer building, where they 
have a large, attractive salesroom. From the outset the business has been a 
success, owing to the good management and general fair dealing which have 
characterized all their transactions. The proprietors are certainly to be con- 
gratulated upon their well-deserved patronage. Politically Mr. Goehring is a 
staunch Democrat, and strongly advocates the principles of that party. He is 
a member of the K. O. T. ]\I., and in matters of religion he accords with the 
doctrines of the Lutheran church, of which he is a regular and consistent at- 
tendant. April 9,' 1896, Frederick Goehring married Martha B. McLain, 
daughter of Henry A. McLain, and their children are: Cynthia Dorothy and 
Albert McLain. 

W. S. BUMBAL'GH, president of the IMonessen Foundry and Ma- 
chine Company, and prominently, identified with several other important en- 
terprises, although not yet forty years old, has worked his way forward to 
the position of affluence he now occupies among the leading business men of 
Westmoreland county, solely through his own personal eiiforts, and he is one 
of the few men whose past records actually justify this apphcation of that 
honorable distinction. 

Born in JMorgantown, West Virginia, October 26, 1866, son of James and 
Isabelle (Peterson) Bumbaugh. W. S. Bumbaugh was deprived of a mother's 
care at the tender age of eighteen months, and confided to the care of his 
sister, who resided in McKeesport, Pennsylvania. It seems, however, to have 
been preordained by the inevitable degree of destiny that young Bumbaugh 
should work out his own salvation without the aid of parent or kindred, as 
when he was eight years old his sister was summoned to her final resting 
place, and the boy was. therefore, thrown absolutely upon his own inherent re- 
sources to obtain sustenance and education as best he could. That he was 
equal to the emergency and that he fully accomplishcfl the arduous task, so 
harshly meted out to him by destiny, is amply attested by the success he has 
already attained, which, considering the almost insurmountable obstacles he 
was forced to overcome, seems little less than phenomenal. After the death 
of his sister, which occurrred in 1874, young Bumbaugh set out with a will to 
master the somewhat difficult proposition of supporting himself, beginning by 
selling newspapers, and subsequently accepting eagerly any other honest em- 
ployment that would contribute toward securing an existence. At the age of 
twelve years he entered the fomidry department of the National Tube Com- 
pany's works at McKeesport as an 'apprentice and there obtained the knowl- 
edge and experience which ultimately enabled him to promote and establish 
the industrial enterprise of which he is now the official head. .After mastering 
the foundry business in its entirety he withdrew from the employ of the Na- 
tional Tube Company in order to acquire additional experience in other parts 



.'?34 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

of the country under different conditions, and having accomplished his object, 
his next move was to obtain an opportunity of using his knowledge and ability 
for his own advancement. Coming to Monessen in 1898, he was soon able to 
secure capital sufficient to organize the Monessen Foundry and Machine Com- 
pany, of which he was chosen president, an enterprise which has been success- 
ful from the start. This concern, which was originally located at the West 
End, moved its plant in 1903 to the East End, where it occupies an area of 
three acres, and in addition to carrying on an extensive general foundry busi- 
ness it gives its particular attention to the manufacture of certain kinds of 
machinery for which it is provided with special facilities. At the present time 
it employs a force of one hundred and twenty-five hands, and there is a large 
and constantly increasing demand for the products of both departments. Al- 
though the Monessen Foundry and Machine Company naturally occupies his 
principal attention, Mr. Bumbaugh is interested financially and officially in 
several other enterprises, being vice-president of the First National Bank of 
Monessen, second vice-president of the Monessen Savings and Trust Company, ' 
piesident of the Monessen Opera Company, and vice-president of the Grand 
View Cemetery Association, all of which he assisted in organizing. He is one 
of the incorporators and largely interested in the "Grand View Plan" (so 
called), a real estate enterprise which purchased a tract of thirty-five acres 
lying in the western part of the borough and has divided it into house lots. He 
is also otherwise interested in the development of real estate in Monessen, and 
has erected several fine dwelling houses as an investment. Aside fi'om his interest 
in developing the natural resources of Monessen and expanding its industries, 
he is actively concerned in the public affairs of the borough, having served as 
a member of the council since 1899, and in 1904 was chosen president of that 
body. In politics he is a Republican. He is a member of Monessen Lodge, No. 
"yTx P'- P- O- E. His religious affiliations are with the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Mr. Bumbaugh married, November 4, 1890, Dora Taylor, daughter of 
Robert and Elizabeth ( McFarland ) Taylor, of McKeesport. They have two 
children. Hazel and Carl Bumbaugh. 

HARRY R. PORE, manager and editor of the Monessen Daily In- 
dependent, and president of the borough council, is a representative of an old 
and highly estimable Westmoreland county family. He is a son of Jacob and 
Sarah Ann ( Miller) Pore, and his ancestors on both sides were among the pio- 
neer tillers of the soil in this section of the state. His paternal grandparents, 
Adam and Margaret (Lobinger) Pore, resided in South Huntingdon townhip, 
and his mother was born in Mount Pleasant, daughter of William Miller, of 
that township. His father in early life followed the carpenter's trade and was 
a well-known building contractor in South Huntingdon, West Newton and ad- 
jacent townships. He finally relinquished that business and turned his atten- 
tion exclusively to agricultural pursuits. He owned a farm of one hundred 
and six acres in South Huntingdon township, known as the old Snyder place, 
the fertility of which he greatly improved, making it one of the most valuable 
pieces of agricultural property in that section of the county. Being naturally 
domestic in his habits he preferred the peace and tranquility of a simple life 
and took special delight in devoting his attention wholly to the care of his 
homestead and the welfare of his family. In his younger days he was a mem- 
ber of the old Sewickley Presbyterian church, but afterward united with the 
same denomination in West Newton. Jacob Pore died in i8go, aged sixty-five 
years. His widow is still living and resides in West Newton. Jacob and 



HISTORY OF JJ-ESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 235 

Sarah Ann C-^liHer) Pore were the parents of seven children, six of whom 
grew to maturity, namely : William H., deceased : Charles S., a hardware mer- 
chant in :\lonesscn : Lu'ella. residing- in West Newton ; Harry R., of whom 
later: Blanche E., wife of L. S. Shape, who is in the hardware business in 
Monessen : and Josiah 2\I.. a resident of West Newton. 

Harrv R. Pore was born in South Huntingtlon township, July, 1872. He 
pursued his preliminary studies in the public schools, was a (jraduate from the 
Northern Indiana Normal school at N'alparaiso in i8yy, and from King's School 
of Oratory, in 1900. Endowed by nature with elocutionary ability of a high 
order, which was enhanced and perfected by the careful training received at 
the above mentioned school of oratory, he decided to utilize his talents as a 
means of obtaining a livelihood, and joining the ranks of public entertainers 
as a monologue artist he toured through the western states with gratifynig 
success, providing unassisted an entire entertainment which was invariably 
recci\ed with excellent satisfaction, emphasized with vociferous applause. But 
physical exhaustion resulting from constant travel, together wnth the long con- 
tinued strain to which the nervous system of a public entertainer is necessarily 
subjected, at length compelled him to relinquish that calling and seek a less 
arduous occupation. Accordingly he turned his attention to journalism and in 
Julv. igoi. he established the ^'lonessen Daily Independent, of which he be- 
came both manager and editor. Having succeeded in placing his journalistic 
enterprise upon a secure financial basis he determined to control, as far as 
possible, the newspaper business of this locality, and with that end in view he 
successfully arranged in 1903 for the consolidation of his paper with the 
Monessen Weekly Leader, extinguishing the name of the latter and issuing 
the united organs under the name of the Independent. The Alonessen Daily 
Independent entered its enlarged field of usefulness under the control of a 
.=;tock company with A. M. Wyant as president, Frank Bumer as secretary and 
treasurer, and Harry R. Pore as manager and editor. Typographically it pre- 
sents an attractive appearance, and in its editorial policy and ideas it is optimis- 
tic, progressive, keenly alive to the conditions within its environments and ab- 
solutely without prejudice in its discussion of the important issues of the day. 
Its circulation is large, which, together with its popularity, establishes beyond 
question its value as an advertising medium. It generally appears, unless en- 
larged to meeet the contingencies of some extraordinary occasion, in four six 
column pages, which contain all the latest news, foreign, domestic, local, etc., 
with such selected matter from exchanges and other sources as is deemed in- 
teresting to its readers. In politics, or "profession of faith," as some news- 
paper wag has humorously called it. it advocates the principles of Independent 
Republicanism. Although not the youngest newspaper men in the state, Mr. 
Pore is certainlv entitled to be considered as one of the youngest managing edi- 
tors within its borders, and his future advancement in his chosen field of use- 
fulness is exceedingly promising. Nor is his activity confined solely to his 
profession as he takes a profound interest in local public affairs, and at the 
present time is serving with marked ability as president of the borough council. 
On October is, 1902, Air. Pore was united in marriage at the Second 
Presbyterian church. Pittsburg, by the Rev. Edwin S. Young, with Louise M. 
Wagner, who was a schoolmate at the Northern Indiana Normal school. She 
is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Wagner, of Kilbourn City, Wisconsin. 

WILLIAM FRANTZ. The family represented in Monessen by Will- 
iam Frantz was brought to this side of the Atlantic by an emigrant from Ger- 



236 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTY. 

many who founded the Frantz settlement near Leechburg, Pennsylvania. 
Peter Frantz was a resident of this settlement, but whether the founder or not 
does not appear. 

Henry Lewis Frantz, son of Peter I'rantz, spent his boyhood in his native 
place and subsequently went to Pittsburg where he engaged in boating. Later 
he had charge of a wharf and also of the coal shipments, and some time after 
purchased a large tract of land five miles above McKeesport, where he engaged 
in farming. .V number of years later he divided this property into different 
farms which he sold, and then retired to McKeesport where he is still living. 
He is a man of the highest moral rectitude and his always been a Republican 
in politics. He was for' many years a member of the Presbyterian church, but 
latterly connected himself with the Methodist Episcopal denomination. Mr. 
Frantz married Sarah McCain, and they were the parents of two sons: William 
Shirwell, mentioned hereafter : and James, who lives in the west. After the 
death of his wife Mr. Frantz married Elizabeth Actor, and by this marriage is 
the father of another son, Ulysses Grant, who is a resident of Dakota. 

William Shirwell Frantz, son of Henry Lewis and Sarah J. (McCain) 
Frantz, was born June 27, 1849, and has spent the greater part of his life in 
McKeesport w^here he is engaged in the insurance business. He married .Sarnh 
Ann Snyder, and the following children have been born to them : William, 
mentioned hereafter; Laura, died in childhood; Robert, superintendent of the 
Metropolitan Insurance Company at Tarentum, Pennsylvania ; Jennie, resides 
at home ; George, a clerk in the auditor's office of the United States Steel Com- 
pany, of Pittsburg; Edward, a mercantile clerk; and Harry, a clerk in the 
shipping department of the Seamless Tube Works, McKeesport. The two last 
named reside at home. 

William Frantz, son of William Shirwell and Sarah Ann (Snyder) 
Frantz, was born May 14, 1870. He attended the ]5ublic schools and then en- 
tered the service of Samuel Goldman, clothier. Later he was employed by Max 
Bachman, who was in the same line of business, and with whom he remained 
until coming to Monessen to engage in business on his own account. August 
■ I, 1903. in partnership with James K. Boyd, he established the firm of Frantz 
& Boyd, clothiers, furnishers and hatters, starting with about eight thousand 
dollars worth of stock which has since been increased to fifteen thousand. Their 
stock and accommodations would do credit to a city much larger than ^Mones- 
ren. Mr. Frantz is master of his calling in each and every department, and is 
tlioroughly equipped for the successful handling of the business in any field 
in which he might be placed. He was one of the founders of the five and ten 
cent store at Donora and is now one of the firm, which is known as that of 
Jack & Company, and is under the management of Frank Jack. Mr. Frantz is 
a member of Monessen Lodge, No. 638, Free and Accepted Masons, and Mc- 
Keesport Chapter, No. 285. He also belongs to Monessen Aerie, No. 492, Fra- 
ternal Order of Eagles. He and his family are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Mr. Frantz married, October 27, i8qi, Ida May, daugh- 
ter of Moses and Felicia Dias, of Webster, Pennsylvania, and they are the 
parents of one child, William Byron Frantz. 

JAMES KELLY BOYD. Although a resident of Westmoreland 
county James Kelly Boyd, of Monessen, belongs by birth and descent to Alle- 
gheny county. He is a son of J. K. and Margaret (W)land) Boyd, and was 
born December 13, 1871, in Allegheny City, where he was reared and edu- 
cated. His father died in 1879, aged forty-two, and his mother survives. 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 237 

Air. Boyd's first employment was in the capacity of office boy for James 
\\". Drape, of Pittsburg;-, and his next was with the U. P. Railroad, whence he 
passed to the service of the C. A. Railroad, where he remained several years 
in the capacity of clerk. He then associated himself with the \V. Dewees Wood 
Company, of ]\IcKeesport, with whom he remained eight years. At the end of 
that time he entered the service of the United States Steel Company, retiring 
some years after as head bookkeeper. He then turned his attention to the 
clothing business, formed a partnership with William Frantz, and in 1903 they 
established their present business in Monessen. Mr. Boyd is a memlier of 
Monessen Lodge, No. 638, Free and Accepted Masons, the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles, No. 492, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 773, the 
\"ersailles Council, No. 238, Royal Arcanum, of McKeesport, and the Improved 
Order of Heptasophs, No. 81, also of McKeesport. He likewise belongs to 
the Knights of Pythias, Monessen, No. 168. He is a member of the United 
Presbyterian church, of Monessen. Mr. Boyd married, February 22, 1893, 
Susan, daughter of John and Marv Toy, of Pittsburg. 

E. M. MOVER, founder and senior member of the E. M. Moyer 
Company, jewelers, of Alonessen, is of German origin, his grandfather, I'^ed- 
erick Moyer. having immigrated from Germany early in the last ccnturv and 
settled in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania. His father, Enoch Moyer, was a 
native of Alifflin county, as is also his mother, who was before marriage Cath- 
erine Baker. 

Enoch Moyer was a tailor by trade but relinquished that occupation in 
order to engage in agriculture, and he resided upon a farm in Lewistown, 
Mifflin county, for the remainder of his life, which terminated in August. 1866, 
one month prior to the birth of his youngest child, E. M. Aloyer. the principal 
subject of this sketch. His widow is still living. Enoch and Catherine 
(Baker) Moyer reared a family of four children, namely: Henry K.. a retired 
farmer of Edgar. Illinois; Howard, a live-stock dealer in Kansas City, Mis- 
souri: Lizzie, wife of J. E. Harman, of Lewiston, Pennsylvania, and E.' i\L. of 
Monessen. 

Born in Lewistown, September 26, 1866, E. M. Moyer began his studies in 
the public schools and completed his education at an academv. At the age of 
fourteen years he entered the telegraph service of the Pennsylvania railroad as 
an apprentice, and having acquired proficiency as an operator he followed that 
business for about fourteen years, during which time he was emploved by 
difterent railroad companies in various parts of the countrv, notablv in 
Elk Garden. West Mrginia, where for a period of eight years he acted as 
operator for the West Virginia Central, which was subse(|uentlv absorbed 
by the Wabash system. Relinquishing telegraphy he accepted a position as 
travelling salesman for a Philadelphia mercantile house (H. Goldsmith), with 
which he remained some two years. In 190 1 he engaged in the jewelry busi- 
ness at Monessen, establishing the E. M. Moyer Company, which he owns. 
They occupy a centrally located store, forty-eight bv twentv-two feet, and in 
addition to carrying the largest and most complete stock of jewelry and kin- 
dred articles, they maintain a fully equipped repairing department, replete with 
every facility in the way of stock, appliances, artisans, etc., for executing with 
neatness and despatch the simplest as well as the most intricate work known 
to the jeweler's art. Since locating in Monessen Mr. Moyer has become widely 
and favorably known both in business and social circles'. He is a member of 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Eagles, Lodge No. 492. In 1891 he was 



238 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

united in marriage with .Miss Flora McKinley, daughter of Wilhani and 
Anna McKinley, of Lonaconing, Maryland. Their children are: Vira, Vesta, 
Frederick, Bettie and Flora. 

SAMUEL S. JONES, a highly esteemed business man of Monessen, 
residing in Belle Vernon, is a son of George W. and Eliza J. (Minehart) 
Jones, of Bridgeport. Fayette county, Pennsylvania, and a grandson of Samuel 
Jones, the latter a native of Virginia, who settled in Greene county, this state. 

George W. Jones located in early life at Bridgeport, where he followed the 
business of a distiller, and was a progressive, public-spirited citizen. His 
death occurred March 24, 1886, at the age of fifty-four years. He was a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the Royal Arcanum. 
Besides his widow, who is still residing in Bridgeport, he is survived by three 
children, namely: George W., a resident of Bridgeport and a travelling sales- 
man for T. C. Jenkins, of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania; Elizabeth J., unmarried; 
and Samuel S., of whom later. 

Samuel S. Jones was born in Bridgeport, January 7, 1874. Having con- 
cluded his studies at the age of sixteen years he entered, as an apprentice, a 
window-glass factory, where he acquired the art of glass-blowing, and he was 
engaged in that industry some nine years. He then became a travelling sales- 
man for the Canfield Oil Company of Cleveland, Ohio, his field of operation 
embracing western Pennsylvania, southeastern West Virginia and a portion of 
Ohio, and he travelled in the interest of that concern for about three years. 
In 1902 he located permanently in Monessen, where he became associated with 
D. A. Miller under the firm name of the Monessen Paint and Glass Company. 
Withdrawing from that firm a year later he established himself in business alone 
as a dealer in ornamental mantels, tile work, fireplace, furniture and fixtures, 
and other fancv decorative materials. In addition to handling these goods as 
merchandise he takes contracts for adjusting mantels, etc., the laying of tile 
floors, walks and other ornamental work throughout western Pennsylvania, 
being about the only one engaged in that line of business in this section of the 
state. Mr. Jones is a member of the Masonic Order and the Royal Arcanum. 
He was married January 22, 1896, to Lee Anna Lenhart, daughter of William 
C. Lenhart, of Fayette City, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Jones have two sons, 
AVilliam S. and George W. 

ROBERT TAYLOR, son of Isaac and Elizabeth (Bosler) Taylor, 
was born near Turtle Creek, Allegheny county. September 3, 1829. He was 
one of a large family, but four of whom are still living: Edward, residing at 
the old homestead ; James, also at the homestead ; Elizabeth, living with her 
brothers on the farm ; Joseph, living near Long Run Church, Allegheny county. 
Isaac Taylor, father of Robert Taylor, was born and reared in Allegheny 
county. ■ L'pon reaching manhood he located at Turtle Creek, where he man- 
aged a hotel for many years, meanwhile acquiring valuable farm lands. Later 
he retired from the hotel business and settled on one of his farms, where he 
spent the remainder of his years. 

Robert Taylor grew up at home, acquiring his education in the common 
schools. At the age of eighteen or .twenty he engaged in the tanning business 
in the vicinity of Greensburg. He carried on this business for a number of 
years, and then came to West Newton and engaged in the lumber and the grain 
business, in which he prospered, having excellent business qualifications. In 
1895, in company with W. S. Van Dyke and S. C. Weimer, he organized the 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 239 

banking firm of \'an Dyke, Weimer and Taylor, which became the leading 
banking institution of this section of the county. They sold the business to 
the First National Bank in 1899. In politics Mr. Taylor was a staunch 
Republican, and served nine years as a school director, but refused other offices 
which were tendered him. He was a public-spirited citizen and was ever active 
in anv movement to promote the business welfare of West Newton. He was 
a member of the Presbyterian Church, and its treasurer for many years. He 
married, Alarch 18, 1856, Sidney ]\larkle, a daughter of General Joseph and 
Elizabeth (Lloyd) Markle. They had four children, two of whom survive: 
Ada B., wife of Dr. L. B. Sutton, of \\'est Xewton ; and Caroline, wife of W. 
S. \'an Dyke, a banker, of Pittsburg. Robert Taylor died in January, 1899. 
Mrs. Taylor still resides at West Newton. 

REBECCA GREEXAWALT. nee McGrew, is the daughter of 
Archibald and Susanna (Gilbert) McGrew, both of Quaker stock. Slie is 
one of three children surviving of eleven. Her father, the son of James Mc- 
Grew, was born in Sewickley township, and lived there throughottt his life. 
He was a fanner and one of the well-known men of that section of the county. 
Politically he was a Democrat, but took no active part in political affairs ; in 
his religious faith he was a Quaker. 

In i860 Rebecca McGrew married Jacob W. Grcenawalt, second son of 
Henry Greenawalt. He was born in \\'estmoreland county, October 27, 1837, 
and attended the common schools of that county, then entered Union College, 
Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. He went west after leaving college and began to 
read law, and was admitted to the bar at Mount Pleasant, Iowa. In the. 
spring of the year i860 he returned home and November 22, i860, was admit- 
ted to the practice of law in the several courts of Westmoreland county. Early 
in .Kpril of the following year he entered into a law partnership with James 
H. Hunter, Esq., a msember of the Greensburg bar. A few days after, April 
17, 1 861, in response to a call from the president for 75,000 men, he, with 
Richard Coulter (afterward colonel of the Eleventh Regiment), raised a com- 
pany which became Company I, Eleventh Regiment. He was elected second 
lieutenant, was subsequently promoted to first lieutenant, and was mustered out 
•of service with his company August i, 1861. Immediately after his return 
home he energetically set about raising a company for three vears' service, and 
this company was mustered into the army as Company E, One Hundred and 
Fifth Pennsylvania \'olunteers. Upon the promotion of Captain Dick to the 
rank of major of the regiment. Lieutenant Greenawalt was raised to captain, 
September 20, 1861, and on the resignation of Major Dick, he was promoted to 
major. November 29, 1862. His next promotion was to the rank of lieutenant- 
colonel. May 4. 1863, and he was with his regiment through all the battles in 
which it participated. He was wounded at the battle of Fair Oaks, and while 
in command of his regiment at the battle of the Wilderness, fell mortallv 
wounded. May 4, 1864. and died a few days after. May 17. 1864. His remains 
were brought home and interred with military honors in the presence of a 
great concourse of his old friends and nei.ghbor's at Mars Hill, a quiet country 
churchyard. He left a wiflow to mourn his untimely end but no chiMren. 
Colonel Greenawalt was immensely i)opular with his men. treating them with 
T<indness and consideration, and avoiding all di.splay of authority or the use of 
harsh langua.ge, which tod often fell upon the ears of the private soldier. He 
liad the warm esteem of his fellow-officers and the confidence of his superiors. 
T!rfg->rh'or General Graham, in a letter to Governor Curtain asking for the pro- 



240 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAXD COUNTY. 

motion of Major Greenawalt to the rank of liuutenant-colonel in his regiment, 
speaks of his conduct at the battle of Chancellorsville, saying, "he exhibited the 
firmness and knowledge of a veteran." One who knew him well says of him, 
"he was an earnest, brave, patriotic man, knowing no fear and entering into 
whatever he did with his whole soul — the longer he was known the more was 
he respected and beloved, in all the relations of life." Colonel Greenawalt was 
a consistent Christian, a worshipper in the Baptist church. His widow is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, an accomplished woman who is 
held in great esteem within the circle of her friends and accjuaintances. 

JOHN PALANAFSKY. One of the progressive business men of 
Westmoreland county, an industrious, useful citizen, and a man prominently 
and actively interested in community affairs, is John Palanafsky, proprietor of 
the Hotel ' Andrews, at Mount Pleasant, Pennsylvania. He was born in 
Autsria, May, 1867, and when a lad of some thirteen years emigrated to this 
country with his parents, Michael and Katie Palanafsky. His father is a resi- 
dent of Mount Pleasant, making his home with his son John. 

John Palanafsky received his education in the public schools of Westmore- 
land county, and on leaving the school room, entered into his first regular 
employment in the mines in Pennsylvania, remaining there until 1894. He 
was then for a time in the employ of the Mount Pleasant Brewing Company, 
and in 1897 he engaged in the hotel business in Mammoth, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, remaining there for two years and seven months. In 
1901 Mr. Palanafsky purchased the Hotel Andrew at Mount Pleasant. This 
hotel is a three story structure, located on Main street near the depot. It is 
a first-class house and accommodates thirty-two guests. Politically Mr. Pa- 
lanafsky is a Democrat. He is one of the enter]:)rising citizens of the borough, 
and is ever willing and anxious to lend his assistance to any enterprise for 
the good of the public. He is a member of the I. O. R. M., No. 337, and the 
Eagles, No. 493. In matters of religion, he is a devout member of the Catholic 
church. He married, in 1890, Kate Babrura, and their children were: Thomas, 
Katie, Joseph, John and Alice. 

JOSEPH E. NEWCOMER. The grandfather of Joseph E. New- 
comer, of Monessen, was Christian Newcomer, a farmer, who' went fromj 
Maryland to Fayette county, Pennsylvania, and settled in Tyrone township. 
His son, David M. Newcomer, spent his life in Fayette county, engaged in 
agricultural pursuits. He was a member of the Christian church. David M. 
Newcomer married Mary E. Walter, and they were the parents of three sons: 
William W., president of the Newcomer School of Expression of Lima College, 
of Lima, Ohio ; Lawrence O., pastor of the Christian church at Eaton, Indiana ; 
and Joseph E., mentioned hereafter. Mr. Newcomer died August 8, 1903, and 
his widow resides with her son Joseph E. At the time of his death Mr. New- 
comer was sixty-five years old. 

Joseph E. Newcomer, son of David M. and Mary E. (Walter) Newcomer, 
was born August 8, 1876, on the homestead, near Dawson, Fayette county, 
where he received his primary education in the public schools, afterward 
attending Redstone Academy, Uniontown, and Mount L^nion College, Ohio. 
Later he entered the classical department of the Ohio Northern L^niversity, 
whence he graduated in 1897. He then engaged for two years in teaching, 
and in 1898 took a business course. He was five years in the school at Ada, 
taking a thorough course in military tactics, and leaving with the rank of 



HISTORY OF H'ESTMORELAXD COUXTV. 241 

lieutenant-colonel, the hii^liest honor which it is in the power of the school to 
confer. The tirst school of which he had charge was his home country school 
in Fayette county and he was for several years vice-principal of the New 
Haven public schools. In the autumn of i8y« he took up his abode in JNlones- 
sen as principal of the schools of that place, a position which he tilled ftir three 
years, resigning at the end of that time in order to engage in the real estate 
business. He termed a partnership with Jesse S. Cook, under the firm name 
of Newcomer & Cook, real estate agents, and on August 1, 1^03, sold out to 
Luce & Sutman. April i, 1904, he entered into partnership with Eli H. Wolf, 
under the firm name of Newcomer & Wolf, successors to Mitchell & Myers 
who had establishetl the business some two years previously. The present firm 
carries on a general land agenc}', limited to .Monessen. They have erected 
several residence properties during the last year, and expect to construct in 1905 
at least half a dozen. Aside from this, Mr. Newcomer has erected personally 
some seven properties. The firm also handles all kinds of insurance, including 
fire, life and accident. They have the exclusive management of the business 
of the Monessen Improvement Company, which is of considerable scope and 
embraces a large amount of property, and are also special agents for the Es^en 
plan of lots. They do no little business in placing loans on mortgages, and 
Mr. Newcomer being a notary public, are prepared to execute all legal papers. 
He is a director in the People's National Bank of ^lonessen, and was appointed 
executor of his father's estate, which is of considerable magnitude, lying chiefly 
in Fayette county. He belongs to the ^^lasonic fraternity, and is an elder in the 
Disciple church of Monessen. also serving as superintendent of the Sunday 
school. Mr. Newcomer married. September 10. 1902. Esther N.. daughter 
of John A. and Martha Hunter, the former an attorney at Fort Recovery, 
Ohio. ^Ir. and Mrs. Newcomer have had one child, Clyde H., who died at the 
age of three months. 

ALLEN P. MUSICK. The family of which Allen P. Musick, of 
Monessen. is a member belongs to Westmoreland county. Samuel Musick 
married Elizabeth, daughter of Abraham. Brinker. also of this countv, and 
among their children was a son, Allen P., mentioned hereafter. 'Wr. and .Mrs. 
Musick are now residents of Lycippus. 

Allen P. Musick, son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Brinker) Musick, was 
bom April 14, 1872, near Hannestown, where he received the greater part of 
his education in the common schools, finishing with one term at Greensburg 
Seminary. .After leaving school he entered the service of the Farmers' Trading 
Company, with which he was connected for some ten \ears. During that 
period. lie advanced to be head of the force and for several years had charge of 
the Hosteller store. During the two last years he was virtually manager of 
both the Hosteller and Whitney stores of the company, thus gaining a large 
and varied experience which has proved of much benefit to him in his own 
personal business. In 1901 he left this position and went to Monessen anrl 
October 3. 1901, he opened a grocery and provision store on Schoonmaker ave- 
nue, and is still carrying on the business on the same site. He purchased the 
property, this providing himself with a residence and a jjlace of business. His 
stock is one of the best selected in the borough and he has built uj) a flourishing 
trade. When he established the business he was associated with iiis brotlur 
under the firm name of Musick Brothers, and the partnership was continnefl 
until February. 1903. when Mr. Musick bought out his brother's interest and 
has since conducted the business alone. He is one of the bnanl of ilirectors 

2—16 



242 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

of the People's National Bank of jMonessen, and was elected first president of 
Merchants' Exchange, also of Monessen. He belongs to the I. O. O. H. ; also 
the F. and A. M., of Monessen. He is a member and trustee of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and also superintendent of the Sunday school. He was 
elected to the office of councilman from the third ward for a term of three 
years. Mr. Musick married, September 17, 1894, May, daughter of W. J. and 
Deborah Peterson, of Ligonier, and they have two children : \\'illiani S.. and 
Merle Wilfred Musick. 

CLARENCE VV. GREER. One of the old families of Penn town- 
ship is that represented by Clarence W. Greer, of Monessen. He is a son of 
Joseph Collins and Jennie E. Greer, and was born November 24, 1875, in Lum- 
ber Citv, Clearfield county, Pennsylvania. 

He received his education in the schools of Johnstown. His first employ- 
ment was with the B. White Coal Mining Company at Anita, Pennsylvania, 
whom he served as bookkeeper and manager of the company's store, positions 
which he retained for six years. He then went to Nansen. Elk county, where 
he became one of a firm conducting a general store of which he had the man- 
ao-ement for a year or more. At the end of that time he sold out his interest, 
w^ent to Monessen and formed a partnership with his two brothers, W. S. and 
J. C. Greer, under the firm name of Greer Brothers. In April, 1903, they 
purchased the general merchandise business which had been established hi 
1897 by Shuster Brothers. They carry the heaviest stock in this line in 
Monesseen, occupying two rooms and employing a small army of clerks. They 
make the grocery department the main feature of the establishment, and are 
doing a large and increasing business. Their store is situated on Schoonmaker 
avenue. The active member of the firm is Mr. Greer, he having charge of 
the conduct of the entire business. Mr. Greer married. May 12, 1896, Mary, 
daughter of T- L. McKeerer, of Irwin, and they have three children : Lois E., 
I. C^'illins, an'd Janice M. Mr. Greer and his wife are members of the Presby- 
terian church. 

HARRY J. BEARER, a resident of Monessen, Westmoreland 
countv, Pennsylvania, and member of the firm of H. J. Bearer & Company, at 
449-4V1 Danv'er avenue, was born in Carrollstown, Cambria county, Pennsyl- 
vania,\Time 6. 1875, a son of John G. C. and Magdalena (Hopple) Bearer, and 
grandson of Francis Bearer, a native of Germany, who emigrated to this coun- 
try, and resided in Berks county for a few years, later locating permanently in 
Cambria county, where he followed the occupation of a farmer, and sulise- 
quentlv became the owner of considerable property. 

John G. C. Bearer (father) is a resident and retired farmer of Spangler. 
Cambria county, where he was born and reared. He is an active Democrat, 
and a devout member of the Roman Catholic church. He married Magdalena 
Hopple, and of their children the following named are those now living: Frank, 
a farmer of Carrollstown : Elmira. wife of E. M. Binder, of Barnesboro ; Etta. 
a nun of the Benedictine order, located at Carrollstown ; Harry, mentioned 
hereafter : Fannie, wife of J. J. McCormick, of Spangler ; Augusta, wife of 
William M. Gordon, of Barnesboro ; Adda and Edith, reside at home ; and 
Ralph, employed by his brother Harry J. as clerk. Mrs. Bearer, the mother of 
these children, died December 31, 1888. 

Harry J. Bearer obtained his educational training in the public schools and 
convent at Carrollstown, and at the age of fifteen years went to Charleroi, 



HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUXTY. 243 

where he learned the trade of tinner and roofer. After one year's residence 
in the latter place he removed to Altoona, Pennsylvania, and there completed his 
trade, and remained for four years. His next removal was to Barnesboro, 
where he engaged in the conduct of a hardware store for E. M. Bnider, con- 
tinuing until August, 1900, when he went to Alonessen. Upon his arrival ni 
.Monessen he formed a partnership with Mr. E. M. Binder, and they entered 
into the tinning and roofing business, being the successors of George Dmkle. 
The business was continued in this way until the spring of 1905, when they 
added a full line of shelf and heavy hardware, paints, oils, house furnishmgs, 
etc. They also have a large trade in ceilings and cornices. This is one of the 
largest aiid most successful stores of its kind in this part of the country. He 
is one of the active and prominent Republicans of Monessen, and is interested 
in all communitv affairs. He has served as member of the Republican county 
committee, member of the school board of ]Monessen, and was for three years 
chief of the Monessen fire department. Fraternally he holds membership in the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, No. 773, and is a charter member of same ; 
Knights of Cohunbus, No. 604, Beaver Valley Council. December 28, 1904, 
Mr." Bearer married Theresa Lynch, daughter of John Lynch, of Cleveland, 
Ohio. They are members of the Roman Catholic church, and their residence 
is at 124 McKee avenue, ^lonessen. 

DR. JOSEPH H. RICHIE was born in Richland county, Ohio, Oc- 
tober. 26, 1836, a son of Andrew A. and Jane (]\Iarshal) Richie. He is one 
of eight children, six of whom survive, namely: Sarah J., widow of Charles 
\'oals, of Findley; Rev. William M., a minister of a United Presbyterian 
church in Iowa; Andrew, Los Angeles, California; Dr. Joseph H., of whom 
later ; George, engaged in the fruit business in Florida ; Margaret, wife of 
Andrew Gibson, Des Moines, Iowa. 

The paternal grandfather of Dr. Richie was a native of Ireland, a school 
teacher, who came to America about 1798, locating at ;\Iount Braddock, Penn- 
svlvania, and went to work at the furnace. Later he removed to Ohio and 
jiurchased a farm in Richland county, Ohio, where he lived during the re- 
mainder of his life. 

Andrew A. Richie, father of Dr. Richie, was born in 1798, at ^It. Brad- 
dock, Pennsylvania, shortly after his parents emigrated from Ireland. He was 
reared in Richland county, Ohio, and when he reached his majority adopted 
agriculture as his means of livelihood. He was a staunch Democrat up to the 
time of the civil war, when he became a Republican, a bosom friend of John 
T. Sherman. He was a consistent member of the United Presbyterian church. 
He died in Richland county at the advanced age of eighty-one years, while his 
wife survived him some years, dying in her ninety-third year. They are both 
buried at Ontario, Richland county, Ohio, where they were living at the time 
of their death. 

Joseph H. Richie was reared in his native place, and aci|nired liis educa- 
tion in the common schools and the Haysville Academy. .\t the first call for 
troops in the civil war he enlisted in the service, March 14, 1861, enlisting in 
Company H, Fifteenth Ohio Volunteers. After the expiration of his hundred 
day service he re-enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Second Regiment 
for three years or until the close of the war. In this regiment he served for 
some nine months, meanwhile having been made sergeant of the company, 
then was transferred to Company I, One Hundred and TU'cntieth Rcgrmcnt, 
as hospital steward. Some twenty-two innnths later he was mustered out as 



244 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

hospital steward with the promise of a commission as second Heutenant, when 
the regiment was captured by "Dick' Taylor and was taken to Texas and held 
prisoners until the close of the war. He had gained some knowledge of medi- 
cine during his hospital service, and finding it much to his liking he took up 
the study under Dr. J. W. Craig, of Ontario, Ohio. After spending some time 
with him he entered the Western Reserve Medical College, of Cleveland, Ohio, 
whence he graduated in the spring of the year, 1867. He then practiced for one 
year with his preceptor, and in June, 1868, removed to West Newton, where 
he practiced for eighteen years. He then located at the mining town of New 
England, Allegheny county, where he continued for seven or eight years, 
and next settled in Sutersville, where he has been located during the past 
twelve years. He is. one of the most widly-known physicians of the county, 
and is a' member of the K. of P., and the I. O. O. F. In politics he is a Repuli- 
lican, but has had no time to spare from the demands of his profession to take 
an active interest in politics. Dr. Richie married (first) in 1868, Jennie An- 
derson, of Shelby, Ohio ; she died twelve years after her marriage, leaving no 
children. He married (second) Nancy Mesner, of Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania. Five children were born to them: Jennie, Josejjh, Clara, Margaret 
and Ada Richie, all of whom are still living at home. 

DR. WILLIAM FULTON PEAIRS was born at Mendon, West- 
moreland county, Nevember 21, 1865, son of John W. and Dinah (Boyd) 
Peairs, one of five children, three of whom survive: John B., of Elizabeth 
township, this county; Sarah C, wife of Daniel W. Weddell, of Boston, Penn- 
sylvania ; and William F., of whom later. The family is of Dutch descent, the 
grandfather of William F., Elisha Peairs, having come to this country from 
Flolland. His son, John W., was born in Elizabeth township, in 1808, and 
was reared to a farm life. He adopted that calling, and sometime in the thirties 
removed to Mendon, where he purchased a farm and resided upon it until about 
1874, when he removed to Elizabeth township. He bought a farm there but 
later retired from active management, turning the work over to his sons. He 
died in 1884, at the age of seventy-six years. While never an office seeker, 
he was a staunch Democrat in politics. He was a Christian gentleman and a 
member of the United Presbyterian church. His wife, Dinah, born in 1827, in 
Allegheny county, was the daughter of John Boyd, a farmer of Elizabeth 
township. She died April 13, 1905 ; she had made her home with Dr. Peairs 
during the latter years of her life. 

William ¥. Peairs was reared in his native place, attended the common 
schools, then the State Normal school, at California, Pennsylvania, after which 
he matriculated at Wooster University, at Wooster, Ohio. After finishing his 
course there he taught in the public schools, and meantime began to read medi- 
cine. In 1889 he gave up teaching and continued his medical studies under the 
preceptorship of Dr. J. W. Malone, of Blythedale, Pennsylvania, now of Brook- 
lyn, New York. In the fall of the year 1890 he entered the College of Phvsi- 
sians and Surgeons at Baltimore, Maryland, whence he graduated with die 
degree of M. D. in 1892. He located in Suterville, Pennsylvania, in the same 
year, practicing for one year in partnership with Dr. J. N. McCune. He then 
purchased the practice and the residence of Dr. McCune. and in the intervening 
years has built up a constantly increasing practice. He is president of the 
board of health, vice-president of the " First National Bank, a member 
of Blythe Lodge, No. 503, F. and A. M. ; Duquesne Chapter, No. 193. R. .-X. 
M. ; Ascalon Commandery, No. 59, of Pittsburg, and of Grace Lodge, No. 405, 



HISTORY OF U'ESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 245 

K. of P. His political sympathies are towards the Republican party. Dr. 
Peairs married, October, 1896. Bertha Franklin, a daughter of H. E. Franklin, 
of Suterville, by whom he has two children, Clyde and Edith Peairs. 

CLIFFORD FAMILY. Four families named, respectively, Prichett, 
Meharg, Parks and ClifTord, came to Ligonier valley in one delegation, before 
the revolution. They all came from the one section in Xew Jersey, and the 
Cliffords prior to that came from England. Cha_rles Clifford was the head of / 
the faniilv in Westmoreland county, and took up about four hundred acres of 
land on which he lived as a farmer during the remainder of his life. This land 
was on Mill Creek, about two and a half miles northeast of the present borough 
of Ligonier. The storv of his capture by the Indians and also of the shooting 
of an Indian by his son James, has been told among the Indian tales in the 
first volume of this series. Charles was a soldier in the war of the revolution, 
his name beinsr found on a miscellaneous list of soldiers of that war, called the 
■"Original Depreciation Pay List," on file among the public records at Harris- 
burg. After securing his release from the Indians, he returned to his family 
and remained there until his death in 1815. His remains were interred in 
Fort Palmer cemetery. In Ligonier vallev Charles Clifford married a woman 
named Gordon, and their children were: Jane, married John Menoher; SaraJi. 
married Robert Reed : Edward ; Charles, married Miss Lytle, from whom is 
descended the Lockport Cliffords. Mary, married Joseph Whitesides ; James, 
married Mary Rogers. It was he who shot the Indian near Fort Ligonier. He 
and his wife. are buried in Fort Palmer cemetery; Joseph, of whom later: 
Thomas, married Catherine Lawson, and from them is descended Colonel John 
Clifford, who built Oak Grove Furnace, and was elsewhere engaged in the ^^ 
iron industry in Ligonier valley. 

Joseph Clifford, son of Charles Clifford, was born in New Jersey, May jr 
15, 1764, died in the Ligonier valley, Pennsylvania, June 9, 1841, a.ged seventy- 
seven years and twenty-five days. He was but a lad when brought by his 
father to the Ligonier valley, and he spent his life on the farm which has been 
in the possession of the family since April 22, 1772. The house which he 
built, with some improvements, is yet standing, and is now the residence of his 
grandson. Abram B. Clifford. About 1792 he married Isabella Prichett, born 
December 31, 1772, died June 23, 1855. She was a daughter of one of the four 
families referred to above. They had become tired of their home in Ligonier 
valley, presumably because of the Indian incursions, and had concluded to move 
back to Xew Jersey and take their daughter Isabella with them. On the night 
before they were to start, Joseph Clifford took Isabella across the hills to 
Squire James Pollock's place, at present the Stark place, where they were mar;>- 
ried and Isabella remained a citizen of the valley imtil her death. Their chil- 
dren were: i. Mary, born February 17, 1793: married (first) Samuel Riddle, 
and after his death (second) John Taylor. She died December 11, 1875. 
2. Charles, born April 5, 1795, died April 19, 1833, unmarried. 3. Sarah, 
horn February 17, 1797, married Charles Menoher, died December 4, 18.SO. 

4. William, born September 19, 1799, died unmarried, August 12. 1855. 

5. Jane, born May 4. 1802, died unmarried, October 4, 1835. 6. Rachel, born 
December 15, 1804, married Thomas L. I'eam, and is the mother of Dr. L. T. 
Beam, who perished in the Johnstown flood. She died February 14, 1836. 
7. Edward, born July 27. 1807, died June 2, 1886. See below. 8. Rebecca, 
born January 17, i8ro. married William ?^lcDowcll, and died Mav 14. 18^7. 



246 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

9. Anil, born April 7, 1813, married James Menoher, and died February 8, 
1899. 

Edward Clifford, son of Joseph and Isabella (Prichett) Clifford, was born 
on the Clifford homestead now occupied by his son, Abram B. Clifford, July 
27, 1807, died June 2, 1886, and was buried at Fort Palmer. Throughout his 
life he was a farmer and stock dealer, was a man of more than ordinary powers, 
/yand became one of the wealthiest men of the valley in his day. In politics he 
■fTvvas a staunch Democrat, and was twice chosen to fill the office of tax collector. 
1 He married, March 24, 1831, Catharine Myers, born March 29, 1808, died June 
'8, 1871, daug-hter of Christopher and Barabara Myers,y'and their children were: 
Joseph, mentioned hereafter. Christopher Myers, born June 24, 1834, died 
April 8, 1900. Charles H., born September 17, 1836, residing in Ligonier, a 
farmer. Benjamin Franklin, born June 24, 1839, died November 2, 1870. 
Abram B., mentioned hereafter. George E., born December 5, 1843. died un- 
married. February 28, 1886. 

Joseph Clifford, eldest son of Edward and Catharine (Myers) Clifford, 
was born in Ligonier township, Pennsylvania, January 29, 1832. In his early 
days he was a teacher in Ligonier township, and then became a merchant in 
Ligonier in partnership with N. M. Marker. After that he became a stock 
dealer, and after the custom of that day took large droves of cattle by way of 
the Pittsburg and Philadelphia pike to the eastern market. Still later he 
shipped stock from western Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana and Chicago, and the 
west to Philadelphia and New York. He was afterwards engaged in the mer- 
cantile business in New Florence, and in the hotel business in Latrobe. After 
retiring from business, on account of his health, he resided in Greensburg. He 
was a man of large build and fine personal appearance. He was a Presbyterian 
in religion, and was a member of Kedron Chapter and K. T., of Greensburg. 
He married, June 29, 1858, Ellen Blythe Bean, and their children were: Cath- 
arine Ellen, Mary Blanch, died in infancy ; Lawrence B., and Josephine. 
Joseph Clifford died at his home in (ireensburg, Pennsylvania, December 29, 
1892, and was buried in the Valley cemetery at Ligonier. His family now re- 
side in Latrobe. Pennsylvania. 

Abram B. Clifford, fifth son of Edward and Catharine (Myers) Clifford, 
was born October 7, 1841, on the same farm which had been the birthplace of 
his father. He received his educatiim in the imblic schools, and has always 
remained on the homestead, cultivating his ancestral acres and engaging in 
stock raising. Like his father he has always been a Democrat in politics. He 
married, October 27, 1868, Margaret C. Best, of Ligonier valley, daughter of 
William and Catherine (Campbell) Best, and their children were: i. Efhvard 
B., married Mary Isabelle BIyth, of Wellsville, Ohio. They reside at Home- 
stead, Pennsylvania. 2. Mary, widow of F. S. Kleindienst. 3. Nancv Maud, 
wife of Denny C. Marker, of Ligonier. 4. Hargnett F., of Ligonier. married 
Nettie Mclntyre, of Wichita, Kansas. 5. Willie May, resides in Wilkens- 
burg, Pennsylvania. 6. Simon Y., a resident of Wilkensburg. 7. Margie 
June, wife of Charles Robb, of Ligonier valley. 8. Paul E., resides at home. 
9. Mertha, died August 18, 1888, aged four years, four months and nine davs. 
There was also one son who died in childhood. The mother of these children, 
Margaret Best Clifford, died November 24, 1889, and was buried in Valley 
cemetery at Ligonier, Pennsylvania. 

EDWARD M. CLIFFORD, M. D., a leading medical iiractitioner of 
Greensburg, was born on the old Clifford homestead on Hanna's Run. Peim- 




I^CMf^'^^Oc (/y 




oy. 



^ 



HISTORY OF JVESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 247 

'jvlvania. October 19. 1856. eldest son of Christopher .Myers and Susan (Alc- 
Elroy) CHfford. The early genealogy of the Clifford family is given m detail 
in the preceding sketches. . . ■■"'''■"1".„ 

Christopher Mvers Clifford ^(father) was born on the old Clifford honic- 
-^stead, June 24, 1834. He was a farmer and stock raiser until about fifteen 
vears' before his death, when he moved to Ligonier village and there engaged 
in mercantile business during the remainder of his life. He married. January 
3. 1856. .Susan .McElroy, daughter of John D. and Sarah (Alenoher) McElroy, 
old residents of \\'estmoreland county^ Both were earnest members of the 
L'nited Presbvterian church. Their clnldren were: Edward JMarcellus, men- 
tioned hereafter; Sarah Clara, wife of J. R. Smith, an attorney of Scottdaie , 
John McElrov, a real estate broker and banker, a resident of Braddock, Penn- 
sylvania ; Charles Henry, a physician of Braddock, Pennsylvania; Joseph- 
Brackley, a phvsician of' McKees'port, Pennsylvania ; Samuel James, a dentist 
in Kansas Citv'. :Missouri; Nelson Myers, a bookkeeper for the Westinghouse 
Companv, in Trafford citv ; Georgeanna. died at the age of eighteen years. 
Christopher M. Clifford died Aprir8, 1900. His wife, Susan (McElroy) Clif- 
ford, died August 25, 1898. 

Edward M. Clifford received his primary education in the common schools 
adjacent to his home, and from there passed to the Ligonier Academy and 
Independence Academy, where he pursued higher branches. He then taught 
for two winters in \\'estmoreland and Indiana counties. He read medicine with 
Dr. H. L. Donlev, of Latrobe, and in the autumn of 1879 entered the Jefferson 
Medical College', Philadelphia, from which institution he was graduated in 
1882 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. During his last year he served 
in the Philadelphia hospitals, thereby greatly adding to the knowledge already 
acquired and greatly benefitting him in many ways during his subsequent 
career. In thespring of 1882 he settled at \'alley Forge, Pennsylvania, where 
he practiced one year, moving thence to Scottdaie. and remaining at that place 
until 1890. He then took up his abode in Greensburg, where he practiced until 
1903, when he removed to Ligonier, having purchased what was known as the 
Frank hotel and cottages on the site of which he built a sanitarium and Ijaths, 
establishing the Ligonier Springs Hotel Sanitarium. This he conducted for 
two vears, acting as president of the company, also as medical director. During 
this time he still continued his practice in Greensburg. devoting two days in 
each week to his patients there. In the early part of the year 1905 he disposed 
of the sanitarium in Ligonier, and then resumed his residence and practic in 
Oeensburg. He married. .April 11, 1882. Kate B., daughter of Hiram and 
Abigail Boucher, of Ligonier. Their children were : Edna, died at the age of 
three years, and Grace, who is at home with her parents. 

JOHN NELSON WEDDLE. M. D. One of the oldest families of 
Westmoreland county is that represented by Dr. John Nelson Weddle, of Mon- 
essen. One of his ancestors, in 1755. came from Hagerstown or its vicinity in 
Pleasant \'allcy. Alaryland. and settled in what is now Rostraver township, 
Pennsylvania. He was accompanied by his son, and together the two erected 
a log cabin, took up land and began the work of clearing. The son remained 
to keep possession with dog and gun while the father returned to Maryland, and 
in the spring of 1756 returned with the other members of the family. The 
descendants of this pioneer ancestor have ever since resided in Westmoreland 
county. 

James Weddle was born February 4, 1822, on the honiestcad, which was 



248 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

situated on the banks of the Youghiogheny river, and was a blacksmith, fol- 
lowing his trade at JNlcKeesport, Reagantown and West Newton. At forty 
years of age he gave up the business and bought a farm in Sewickley township, 
which was his home until two years prior to his death when he moved to West 
Newton and there passed the remainder of his life. He was interested in 
local affairs and held various minor offices, among them that of school director. 
Mr. Weddle married Sarah Ann Parker, and five children were born to them: 
Nancy, married James Andrews, of Westmoreland county ; Edward P., a phy- 
sician in Scottdale ; Elizabeth, married Frank Cochran, of Scottdale ; John Nel- 
son, mentioned hereafter; and Jessie M., married Ezra M. Kirk, of Greensburg. 
The death. of Mr. Weddle occurred March 28, 1901. at his home in West 
Newton. 

John Nelson Weddle. son of James and Sarah Ann (Parker) Weddle, was 
born' September 3, 1858, at McKeesport, where he received his ])rimary educa- 
tion in the public schools, afterward attending the Indiana State Normal school. 
He spent three years as civil engineer for the Negleys, of Pittsburg. He stud- 
ied medicine with his brother. Dr. Edward P. Weddle, and in 1887 received 
from the Western Pennsylvania Medical College the degree of Doctor of Med- 
icine. He entered upon the practice of his profession in Braddock, whence in 
1893 he moved to Madison, leaving that place the following year for West 
Nfwton, where he remained until TQOi, when he settled in Monessen, having 
throughout these changes always continued to be a resident of his native state. 
He is surgeon for the Pittsburg Steel Company, at Monessen. He is a mem- 
ber of the" County, State and American Medical Societies, and belongs to the 
Knights of Malta^ Monessen Commandery, No. 332. In addition to. these he is 
one of the charter members of Valetta Commandery, Knights of Malta, of 
Braddock. He is a member of the Presbyterian church. Dr. Weddle married, 
December 26, 1889. Margaret Emma, daughter of Robert and Harriet 
(Weimer) Douglas, of Newton, and three children have been born to them — 
two daughters and a son : Lulu, Harriet, and Robert Edward. 

JOHN T. SAYERS. For many years John T. Sayers has been num- 
bered among the worthy citizens of Scottdale. He is a son of Charles and 
Rebecca (Wells) Sayers, who were born and reared in Baltimore county, 
Maryland. The former was employed as a skilled operator in rolling mills. 
Both are now deceased. 

John T. Sayers came to Scottdale in 1880, and for a number of years was 
employed as weighmaster by the Everson & Macrum iron works. He then en- 
tered the service of the United States Steel Company, with whom he remained 
tliree years. He established himself in a mercantile business, in August, 1900, 
which he has since successfully conducted. He is active in the Baptist church, 
of which he has been for thirty-four years a member. About eighteen years 
ago he w-as ordainod a deacon and also holds the office of president of the board 
of trustees. l^Tr. Siyers married, June, 1890, Elizabeth Strong. i\Ir. and Mrs. 
Sayers are without children. 

ANDREW HAWTHORNE. Among the worthiest of Scottdale's 
foreign-born citizens is Andrew Hawthorne. In 1869 he emigrated from 
county Down, Ireland, and settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where for 
about two years, he was variously employed. He then went to Pittsburg and 
for two years worked at the Eliza furnace. He moved to Scottdale in 1873, 
where he was employed as a blacksmith by the Charlotte Furnace Company. 



HISTORY OF irESTMOREL.-lXD COUXTV. 249 

Since 1895 he has been successfully engaged in mercantile business. He is a 
good citizen, and has served two terms as a member of the council. His politi- 
cal princi])les are those advocated and upheKl by the Republican party. He is 
an active member of the United Presbyterian church of Scottdalc. in which he 
was ordained an elder twenty-eight years ago, and in which for a long ])eriod 
he has served as a teacher in the Sundav school. Mr. Hawthorne married 
Mrs. Susanna iMcCullough. and their children were: John ].. William, who 
died at the age of nine years ; and Anna Eliza, who was four years old at the 
time of her death. 

John J. Hawthorne, the eldest of the three children, was born August 
22. 1S74. and is a clerk in the service of the United States Steel Company. He 
married Mav Marshall, and they have three children: Anna Frances, born May 
14, 1898; William Andrew, born August, 1899: and Elsie Alerrion, born 1902. 

JACOB L. XAYHOUSE. The ancestors of Jacob L. Xayhouse, of 
Monessen, belonged to that ancient people which, more deeply than any other 
has stamped its influence upon the governments and institutions of mankind, 
and which in recent years has given to the world the names of Montefiore, 
Disraeli and ZangAvill. Mr. Xayhouse is the son of Samuel and .^arah (Sumer) 
Xavhouse, and was born in Poland, September, 1877. His jjarents arc still 
living in their native land where his father is a hardware merchant. 

After receiving a thorough education in several languages. Jacob L. 
Nayhouse came at the early age of fourteen to the United States. After 
spending eighteen months in Elmira, Xew York, he went to Pittsburg, and 
ever since ha? remained in this part of Pennsylvania. On coming to this 
county he found employment at once as a salesman, and in September. 1898, 
went to Monessen. in company with his brother Abraham, with whom he 
formed a partnership for the purpose of engaging in the clothing and shoe bus- 
iness. The firm was known as Xayhouse Brothers, and was the first to enter 
upon that line of endeavor in this borough. Under their efficient management 
the enterprise prospered, and the connection was maintained until January 24, 
1905. when Mr. Xavhouse withdrew from the firm in order to establish him- 
self as a shoe dealer exclusively. His place of business is in all respects one of 
the most thoroughly eqjuipped to be found in western Pennsylvania, and among 
his specialties is the J. L. X. shoe, a style made exclusively to his order. He is 
the owner of good real estate in Monessen, having built several properties, all 
of which he endeavors to make first-class. He is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias, the B. P. O. E., the. I. O. O. H., and the D. U. B. In religion he ad- 
heres to the faith of his forefathers, and is secretary of the congregation to 
which he belongs. Mr. Xavhouse married, January 19, 1904, Xellie C, daugh- 
ter of Louis Roden, a merchant of McKeesport. 

WILLIAM D. HUXTER, M. D., a practicing physician of Mones- 
sen, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, is a native of Derry town.ship, this 
county, born October 21. 1870, son of James and Martha .\. (Bailey) Hunter. 
His father is a native of Ligonicr valley, and a resident of Derry townshi|i. 

William D. Hunter was reared in Westmoreland and .Allegheny counties, 
the first six years of his life having been sijent in Pittsbur<r. .After receiving 
a public school education he entered the militarv academy at Portsmouth, Ohio, 
where he took a scientific course with a view to entering West Point, to which 
institution he received an appointment, but was barred on account of the age 
limit. He also had opjiortunity to enter .Annapolis .Academy, btit was unable 



250 HISTORY OF IVESl MORELAND COUNT'Y. 

to obtain the consent of his parents. After leaving the niiHtary school at 
Portsmouth he engaged in the contracting and building business with his father, 
and later spent three years in the machinist's trade. He decided upon a medi- 
cal career, and in 1893 commenced the study of the profession under the pre- 
ceptorship of Dr. L. C. Thomas, of Latrobe, and J. C. Hunter, his brother, of 
Apollo, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania. Mr. Hunter entered the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons at Baltimore, Alary land, in October, 1897, from 
which'he was graduated April 29, 1901. While preparing himself for a gen- 
eral practice Dr. Hunter made a specialty of the study of diseases of the eye 
and ear and also surgery. After his graduation Dr. Hunter practiced for one 
year under the preceptorship of his former instructors, and in the spring of 
1902 located at Monessen, where he has since remained. He has established 
himself in an extensive and lucrative practice, and formerly held the position 
of surgeon to some of the mills of this section. He is medical examiner for the 
Pittsburg Life & Trust Company, Provident Savings Life Assurance Society, 
Prudential Life Company, American Tempernce Life, also some fraternal in- 
surance companies. He' is a member of the American Medical Association. 
He is a member of the F. and A. M., becoming a Mason at Charleroi, Penn- 
sylvania, and is now a charter member of Monessen Lodge No. 638. A mem- 
ber of the A. L O. K. M., No. 332, Monessen, K. of P., Latrobe Lodge, No. 
177, and U. R. K. of P., No. 59. He is a Republican in politics, and is a mem- 
ber of the L'nited Presbyterian church. Dr. Hunter married, October 31. 
1900, Jennie C. Hill, daughter of G. W. Hill, of Derry township, this county. 
They have one child, William D. 

MATTHEW OSBORN, proprietor of the Osborn House, was born 
August 25, 1836, in North Huntingdon township, Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania, a son of George and Jane (Cowan) Osborn, one of four children, 
three of whom survive; Judith, wife of Jonathan W. Douthitt, of Eldorado, 
Kansas; Eliza, wife of Eli C. Cavitt. Lake City, Iowa; and Matthew, of whom 
later. 

The paternal grandparents were Archibald and Judith (McWilliams) 
Osborn, he being a native of England and she of Protestant Irish stock, born 
in the north of Ireland. They were married in this country and later settled 
in North Huntingdon township, where they lived and died. Their homestead 
has passed out of the possession of the family. On the maternal side the 
grandparents were Joseph and Fannie (Patton) Cowan, both natives of New 
Jersey, born just across the line from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, their parents 
"having immigrated from Scotland. These grandparents came into Pennsyl- 
vania during the days of Indian possession, and settled in the vicinity of what 
is now known as Osceola Hill, Allegheny county, others coming with them, 
namely : George Cowan, a brother of Joseph Cowan, and veteran of the war 
of 1812; Rachael and Sarah, sisters in a family of the name of Hope; one 
William Ekin, whose farm is still in the possession of the Ekin family, now in 
the fourth generation. There was one other member of the party, John Cowan, 
who was captured by the Indians shortly after his arrival and taken bythem 
into the Lake Erie region, but two years later, on a trading expedition, he 
escaped and returned to his people. 

George Osborn. son of Archibald Osborn, was born on the same farm in 
North Huntingdon township where Matthew Osborn was born, in 1802. In 
his young manhood he learned the hatters' trade, which pursuit he followed 
during his short life. He died at the age of thirty-three on the old home farm 
where he was born. 



HISTORY OF U'ESTMOREL.-IXD COUXTV. 251 

?klatthe\v Osborn grew up in the place of his birth, attending the public 
schools until he had reached the age of sixteen, when he found employment 
as a messenger from the terminus of the Pennsylvania railroad station at 
- Beath' Station to the old Tavern stand of Samuel LUythe, a distance of two 
miles, receiving ten dollars per month, and board. He continueil at this for a 
few months, then accepted a position in a store in his home town, Jacksonville, 
where he worked for one year. For the next six or seven years he was in the 
coal mines at Coultersville, driving a mule. He went into the mines of the 
Yough Coal Company as a driver in 1853. Upon the breaking out of the Civil 
war he and his brother-in-law contracted with R. R. McOuiston and Com- 
pany to haul coal to the river and load the boats, which proved a money-mak- 
ing undertaking. In September, 1862, he took charge of a small coal property 
for Scott Andrews and Company, which was incorporated with the Y. C. H. C. 
Company, and ^Ir. Osborn remained in the position of manager of the prop- 
erty until 1880. In 1883 he built a hotel, in company with Mr. Joseph Hough, 
at Smithton, but some months later he sold his interest to his partner, and in 
1884 built the modern hotel building in Suterville of which he is pro])rietor. 
His hotel has the reputation of furnishing the best accommodations between 
McKeesport and Connellsville, and he is one of the best known men of West- 
moreland county. 

Mr. Osborn married, in 1857. Elizabeth Gregg, of Westmoreland county. 
She died in November, 1904, survived by nine children, James H., office clerk 
in the machine shops of the Pittsburg Coal Company; George E., director of 
the Suterville First National Bank : Oliver O., a Baltimore and Ohio railroad 
conductor : Jane C. and Anna G., twins ; Lawrence E., superintendent of the 
Douglass plant of the H. C. Frick Coke Company; Maud H., wife of C. M. 
Suter, of Suterville ; Edith L. and Eva A. With the exception of Maud H., 
the daughters all remain at home. Mr. Osborn is Democratic in politics, and is 
a member of the town council of Suterville. He is also a member of Franklin 
Lodge, No. 221, F. and A. M., of Pittsburg, Duquesne Chapter, No. 193, R. 
A. M., of Pittsburg, and Kedron Commandery, No. 18, K. T.. of Greensburg. 

EDWIN JONES, son of John and Mary (Lane) Jones, was born 
March 8, 1849, in Wales, one of six children, four of whom survive; John, 
McKeesport ; Elizabeth, wife of William Lape, Courtney, Allegheny county ; 
Henry J., Westmoreland county ; Edwin, of whom later. The father and mother 
were both born in \\'ales and emigrated to America in 1852. locating at Mc- 
Keesport, Pennsylvania. John Jones was a butcher by trade, but worked in the 
coal mines for some time after coming to this country. Later he engaged in 
the butcher business, and for many years was identified with that line of work 
in McKeesport. He also opened and conducted a hotel there for many years. 
After his retirement he removed to Scott Haven, where his death occurred in 
1902. His wife died in 1899. In politics he was identified with the Republican 
;">arty. but was never an office seeker. 

Edwin Jones attended the common schools, but at the earlv age of sixteen 
years left home and began to shift for himself, going to Irwin Station and 
finding employment in the coal mines as a mule driver. Later he went to 
Painter Town, where he worked as a coal digger, then went from there to 
Noblestown, Allegheny county, where he contracted to haul coal hv tlie hun- 
dred weight. While there he married Ellen Doming, of Pittsburtr. About 
1869 he returned to McKeesport and worked in the mines for a short time, 
then located at Moore's Station, now known as Scott Haven, where he was 



252 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

employed in the mines for a number of years. About 1888 he engaged in the 
butcher business, which he conducted for three years, then sold out and settled 
in Suterville. He opened a butcher shop and has conducted it since in a very 
successful manner. Mr. Jones is a director and stockholder in the First Na- 
tional Bank of Suterville, and is one of the leading business men and best- 
known figures of the borough. He is a member of Grace Lodge, No. 405, K. 
of P., of Markleton, Westmoreland county. 

ELI C. SUTER. The ancestors of the late Eli C. Suter, of Suter- 
ville, had their original home in Germany, whence they emigrated to this 
country. He was a son of Henry and Susan (Waltz) Sutcr, and was born 
July 14, 1819. at Ruffsdale. 

At a very early. age he left home and began to work his own way. The 
only education he had was acquired by attending school for a short time while 
he worked for a farmer for the princely salary of three dollars a month. Col- 
onel Israel Painter, of Westmoreland county, was attracted by the sturdy boy 
and gave him a chance to work on the old turnpike leading from Mount Pleas- 
ant to Mononaghela City. He took this work by contract, working at first 
with ]5ick and shovel. So straightened were his circumstances and so care- 
fully did he look after his financial affairs that he has often related how he 
wore his only pair of shoes to the scene of his daily labors, and when he ar- 
rived there took them ofif and worked barefooted in order to save the shoe 
leather. By his digging he earned enough to buy a blind horse, and thus 
added to the remuneration he gained by his work on the turnpike ditches. In 
this position he gradually accumulated enough to procure help, and his work 
was enlarged by taking contracts to repair the road. In this way he became 
possessed of sixteen hundred dollars which his friend. Colonel Painter, kept 
for him, and then turned his attention to milling, in the different departments 
of which he engaged during the remainder of his life. He first bought a flour 
mill known locally as "Waltz's grist-mill," and after operating it for several 
years sold it and moved to Millvale, where he purchased another flour mill. 
The product of this he hauled to the Youghiogheny river and floated down to 
Cincinnati, bringing back with him a cargo of merchandise. The business 
proved lucrative, and he was enabled to acquire one hundred and sixtv acres 
of timber land. He also entered into the lumber business, erecting a saw mill 
which he operated by water power. The situation not being equal to the re- 
quirements of his trade he sold it. and in 1849 nioved to the neighborhood of 
what is now Suterville, on the Youghiogheny river, where he spent the greater 
part of his life. He there operated a saw and a planing mill, managed a ferrv 
and cultivated a farm. At one time he built coal boat bottoms and a steamboat. 
By all these means, aided by his industry and good management, he graduallv 
built up a business which has become noted throughout western Pennsylvania. 
In the same manner, buying piece by piece, he became the owner of extensive 
lands. He surrounded himself with a body of competent men whom he at- 
tached to him by ties of personal friendship. R. D. Brown, now seventy-two 
}ears old, worked and lived with "the Colonel," as he was familiarly known 
among his friends, no fewer than fifty-five years, and was w^ith him in his last 
hours. 

Mr. Suter was one of the foremost men in the slack water river naviga- 
tion movement, and a strenuous advocate of navigation on the Youghioghenv 
river. He was largely interested in getting an appropriation of five thousand 
dollars from the legislature for this purpose. He laid out the town of Suter- 



HISTORY OF ll'ESTMORELAND COUNTV 



253 



ville, sold the entire plan of lots, cut the tiniher and built houses, yet never op- 
pressed any of his purchasers when in financial straits, and was never known 
to press a man beyond his ability to pay, or to use to the injury of another the 
power conferred on him by his position. In religion he was a Lutheran, gave 
free sites to all the churches of that denomination in his neighborhood, and 
was a liberal contributor to all church and charitable work. Mr. Suter was 
thrice married, one of his wives being" Mary A. Cowan, by whom he was the 
father of four children, two of whom survive: Charles, who, lives at home; 
and C. M.. who is engaged in the lumber business in Suterville. Mr. Sutcr's 
rugged constitution and well-knit frame enabled him to endure all kinds of 
hardship, and he retained his strength until near the time of his death. He 
was a ttriking example of what may be accomplished bv pluck and ambition 
and by a determination to conquer adversity. His genial disposition won 
friends for him in every calling in life, and he maintained always his habit of 
self-reliance and liis independent spirit. 

JAMES L. FREEBLE, one of the best known anil most extensive 
real estate dealers in Westmoreland county, was born Februarv 24, 1877, in 
Mount Pleasant, the son of Thomas D. and Mary B. (McKean) Freeble. His 
father, Thomas D. Freeble, was born June 25, 1843, in Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, and married Mary B. McKean, born July 6, 1844, daughter of 
Thomas H. McKean. Thomas H. ^IcKean's grandfather, the great-great- 
grandfather of James L. Freeble, emigrated to this country from Ireland in 
a very early day, and was one of the signers of the Declaration of Indcjicn- 
dence. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Freeble were: Thomas 
M.. married lona Johnson; A. G., married Carrie Mvers, daughter of John 
Myers; James L. : Emma I\I. married John W. Dodds, son of J. W. Dodds, of 
Youngstown, Pennsylvania; Iva M., and Benjamin F., who married Elizabeth 
Moffat, of Latrobe, Pennsylvania. 

James L. Freeble, third son of Thomas D. and Mary B. (McKean) 
Freeble, received his early intellectual training in the common schools of his 
native place, and later attended Normal school for three years. Leaving school 
at the age of twenty he decided to enter into a business career, and in 1898 en- 
gaged in the real estate business in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, where he has done 
and still continues to do a very extensive business. He entered into his business 
life with no capital but poverty and energy, and the latter with his perseverance 
and good business methods have raised him to a high degree of success in his 
chosen line of work. He now ranks among the highest tax jiayers and ]irop- 
erty owners in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, and it is a known fact that he does the 
most extensive real estate business in \\'estmorcland coimtv. In 1903 he 
erected a three-story flat house known as the Freeble building, which is situ- 
ated on Ligonier street, between Spring and Weldon streets, and Mr. Freeble 
conducts his business in a suite of offices in this building on the first floor, 
front. Mr. Freeble is not married. 

FRAXK BUMER. Through both his parents Frank Bumer, of 
Monessen, is the descendant of derman ancestors. George I'.umer emigrated 
in October, 1879, from Rhine-Bavaria to the United States and .settled at Mill- 
vale. .Allegheny county. Pennsylvania, where he engaged in farming. His wife 
was Mary Ann Sherrer, and among their children was a son Frank, men- 
tioned hereafter. Mr. Bumer died in 1882, at Millvale. 

Frank Bumer, son of George and Mary Ann (Sherrer) I'.umer, was 



254 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

born March 23, 1861, in Rhine-Bavaria, aud was educated in the schools of his 
native land, completing his course of study at the seminary in Alsace-Lor- 
raine. He was nineteen years old when the family came to this country, and 
for a time remained on the farm, assisting in his father's labors. He also acted 
as clerk in stores, was connected with the management of hotels, and engaged in 
various other occupations, all in Allegheny county. He there learned the jew- 
elry or watchmaking trade, having had an ambition from early childhood to 
acquire this branch of industry, and being endowed by nature with mechani- 
cal ability. For two years he conducted a jewelry establishment on Beaver 
avenue, Allegheny, doing his own repair work. In 1898 he moved to M ones- 
sen and there erected the Hotel Monessen, the second hotel built in the borough. 
This he opened to the public in April, 1899, and conductd it until September 
of the same year, when he relinquished the proprietorship in order to engage in 
the real estate and insurance business, handling all kinds of insurance and in 
his real estate operations confining himself to Monessen. In 1903, in connec- 
tion with William Bertelmann, he laid out a plan of lots at the head of First 
street, the plan being called the "B. & B. plan," and consisting of twenty-eight 
lots. He has been continuously in the real estate business longer than any other 
man in Monessen, and has probably handled more property in this borough 
than has any one else. In one day his sales reached as high as twenty-five 
thousand dollars. In addition to the hotel above mentioned he has built his 
own house and also three other properties. He is one of the stockholders in the 
trust company and also in the opera house, of which he was one of the pioneer 
movers, and with which he is further connected by holding the office of secre- 
tary to the board. In 1899 he organized the German Beneficent Union, of 
which he is secretary, being also a stockholder in their hall. He is secretary of 
the Daily Independent, of Monessen, and is now serving his second year as a 
member of the board of education. He belongs to the Royal Arcanum and is 
trustee of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, No. 773. In politics he 
affiliates with the Republicans. He was the organizer of the German Lutheran 
church, of Monessen, and it is through his efforts that the congregation now 
worship in a substantial and commodious edifice. He holds the office of sec- 
retary of the church. 

Mr. Burner married. February 12, 1888, Mary Auer, and they have five 
children : Minnie, Clara, Elsie, Frank L., and Marie. Mr. Bumer's house com- 
bines a residence and place of business, and here in 1904 he opened a grocery 
store which is conducted by Mrs. Bumer. It is worthy of note that the twelfth 
day of February appears to be a date of some significance to Mr. Bumer. On 
that day, in 1888, his marriage took place, as mentioned above. On the same 
day in 1901 he was appointed notary public, and on February 12, 1905, his 
appointment was renewed. 

PETER AM.A.NN. An American by virtue of citizenship, Peter 
Amann, of ]\Ionessen, is bv birth and parentage a German. Jacolj .\mann. a 
native of Germany, was a stonecutter and contractor, and about 1888 emigrated 
to the LTnited States. He settled at Irwin, in this county, and there engaged in 
business, and built himself a house in Penn township. He attended the Roman 
Catholic church. His wife, Charlotte (Von Blane) Amann, bore him the fol- 
lowing children: Katie, deceased ; Jacob W., lives in Penn township, on the old 
homestead: Peter, mentioned hereafter: John, a resident of Penn Station: and 
Ada. Mr. .\mann died at his home in Penn township.Octobcr 22. 1904, aged 
sixty-six years. 



HISTORY OF IVESTMORELAXD COUXTY. 255 

f'eter Amann, son of Jacob anil Charlotte (\ on Blane) Aniann, was uurn 
August II, 1875, on the banks of the Rhine, and received his education in the 
.schools of his native land. He was about eleven when the family came to this 
country, and in his new home sought the advantages to be derived from at- 
tendance at night schools. His first employment was on a farm, where he 
worked for two years, after which he spent one year in a glass factory in Jean- 
nette. He was then employed for a time in a brickyard and for three years 
operated a machine in a coal mine. His next venture was as a clerk, and for 
six years he was employed in this capacity in Jeaimette. In .March, 1899, he 
established himself in the grocery and provision business at Alonessen, begin- 
ning in a modest way, and achieving' success by giving his exclusive attention 
to the building up of his business. He carries a complete stock of staple and 
fancy groceries, his goods being all of the selected varieties. His business is 
now one of the finest of the kind in the borough and also the oldest of those 
conducted under one name. He belongs to the C. M. B. A., the I. O. H., the 
F. O. E., the B. P. O. E., and the Knights of Columbus. Mr. Amann mar- 
ried, October, 1899. Laura, daughter of Michael Doney, and they are the 
parents of one child, Agnes Amann. Airs. Amann is a native of Wheeling, 
West A'irginia. Air. and Mrs. Amann are members of the Roman Catholic 
church. 

H. X. ODBERT. borough treasurer of Monessen, and one of the 
prominent and influential factors in the financial and industrial enterprises of 
the borough, is a native of Belleville, Washington countv, Pennsvlvania, born 
September 17, 1866, son of Arthur and Caroline (Xewkirk) Odbert, both de- 
ceased, who were natives of Washington county, Pennsylvania. Arthur Odbert 
was a sucessful merchant, a man who took a deep interest in educational and 
leligious aflfairs, serving as a member of the school board for twenty-seven 
years, and active in the interests of the Alethodist Episcopal church. 

H. N. Odbert was reared in Belleville, educated in the common schools, 
learned the trades of carpentering and photography, and is now engaged in the 
real estate business. In 1900 he removed to Alonessen. having purchased two 
>ears previously a lot on Banner avenue, between Fourth and Fifth streets, for 
which he paid S532.50, this property at the present time (1905) being valued 
at anywhere between six to ten thousand dollars, which clearly demonstrates 
the wonderful increase in the value of real estate in that borough during the 
last few years. Upon this lot Mr. Odbert erected, in 1899, a three-story "brick 
building for business purposes, which was at that time the most pretentious 
building in the borough, he occupying the upper part or third story for a 
photograph gallery, which business he conducted for some years. He then 
disposed of the same, and since then has devoted the greater part of his time 
and attention to the real estate business. He has been active in real state oper- 
ations, having erected five or six houses for private residences. January i, 1906, 
he purchased the hardware store on the corner of Fifth and Donner avenues. 
known as the Shell Hardware Company, and known at the present writing as 
the Alonessen Hardware Company. He was one of the organizers and original 
stockholders in the Peoples' National Bank of Alonessen, and was one of t'le 
original board of directors, serving in that capacity at the present time. He 
has taken a keen interest in the conduct of the aflfairs of the borough, and is 
row serving his second term as city treasurer, having been elected on the Re- 
publican ticket. He is one of the live, broad-minded men of this part of West- 
moreland county, and stands for all that is just and upright, fullv deserving 



256 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

the success which has attended his well-directed efforts. He holds membership 
in the Methodist Episcopal church of Monessen, in which he serves as trustee 
and steward, and to the support of which he contributes most liberally. Mr. 
Odbert married, April 27, 1890, Emma J. Walker, of .Mount Pleasant, Ohio, 
daughter of Elias and Frances H. Walker. Two children have been the issue 
of this marriage : Frances and Ivan Odbert. 

EDWARD UARNES, M. D. The ancestors of Dr. Edward iiarnes, 
of Monessen, were Scotch-Irish. His parents were James and Eliza (Patter- 
son) Barnes, the former a farmer of Mercer county. Both are now deceased. 
Dr. Barnes was born November 30, 1849, in Mercer county, where he was 
reared on a farm and received his primary education in the public schools, later 
attending the Edinboro State Normal school. He began the study of medicine 
with Dr. Boyd, also enjoying the instructions of Drs. Gibson and Berlin. He 
entered the Eclectic Medical College, Indianapolis, Indiana, graduating in 1882 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. The greater part of Dr. Barnes' pro- 
fessional life has been passed in Mercer county with some periods in Venango 
and Lawrence counties. Since April i, 1903, he has been engaged in active 
practice in Monessen. While in New Castle, where he spent some time, his 
.specialty was gynaecologv, but he now makes a specialty of chronic diseases. 
In 1904 he was a delegate to the National Eclectic Medical convention held in 
St. Louis. He is a member of the National and State Eclectic Medical Socie- 
ties, a director of the State Eclectic Medical Association, and belongs to the 
ord-r of Ben Hur. Dr. Barnes married, in 1873, Laura Anson, and they were 
the parents of four sons: John G., Mant McGovern, an engineer on the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad; James N., a moulder; and Byron Brun, a student. Mrs. 
Barnes died in 1882. and Dr. EJarnes married, in 1901, Nettie Dean. Dr. and 
Mrs. Barnes are members of the Presbyterian church. 

HARRY E. RINEHART, of Monessen. to which borough he re- 
moved on June 2, 1898, it being then but a small hamlet of a few houses, is a 
native of \Vaynesburg, (ireene county, Pennsylvania, born June 27, 1864, son 
of Morgan and Elizabeth ( Pettet ) R'inehart, iDoth deceased. Morgan Rinehart 
(father) was born, reared and spent his life in Greene county, where he fol- 
lowed his trade of shoemaker. He served four years in the Civil war, being 
a member of the Eighty-fifth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and 
was wounded by a piece of shell at the battle of the Wilderness. He was a 
son of Simon and Lettie Rinehart. 

Harrv E. Rinehart was reared in W^aynesburg, educated in the public 
schools thereof, and at the age of sixteen years removed to Pittsburg and there 
learned the trade of painting. From thence he removed to the coke regions, 
where he spent several years, after which he engaged in base ball playing, 
starting with Scottdale and then going to Easton. Pennsylvania, where he en- 
tered tire Interstate League, and this profession he followed up to the year 1890. 
He t'.ien located in Charleroi, Westmoreland county, and engaged at contract- 
ing, painting.operating a large force of men,and continuing the same up to 1892. 
He thjn moved to Gloiister, New Jersey, where he resided for a period of almost 
two vears, at the expiration of which time he removed to McKeesport, Pennsyl- 
vania, and June 2, 1898, took up his residence in IMonessen. He came to this 
borough for the purpose of operating a cigar factory, which business he suc- 
cessfully conducted for three years, at which time or during which time he was 
largelv interested in real estate transactions. In T901 a company was formed 



UISTORV OF IVESTMORELAXD COUNTY 



-D/ 



to manufacture brick, the same being composed of ilarrx- E. Rinehart. L. .M. 
Faust, Adolph Bees and John INIenefee, but during the same year JMessrs. 
Faust and Boes disposed of their interest to the two other members of the 
firm, who conducted the business under the name of the Monessen Brick 
\\'orks. The plant was located at East Charleroi, is equipped with the most 
modern machinery for the purpose, and its daily output of fifteen thousand 
brick is largely disposed of in Monessen and adjacent vilhiges. The conduct of 
this plant is under the personal supervision of ^Ir. Rinehart, who is a most 
thorough and capable man in every respect, and well qualified for the active 
management of men and affairs. He is one of the most progressive men of 
the borough, and by good judgment and business sagacity has accumulated a 
comfortable competence. He erected four buildings for business purposes in 
Monessen, also an elegant and modern residence for himself and family in 
1904, whilst Mrs. Rhinehart has erected three buildings for residential pur- 
poses. Mr. Rinehart was a member of the first borough council of Monessen, 
and in 1900 was elected burgess of the borough, and while an incumbent of this 
office also filled that of tax collector, serving for three years. He was a mem- 
ber of the county Republican committee for several years, and one of the prom- 
inent factors in the ranks of the party, wielding a wider and more powerful 
influence than any other man in this section of the county, and being fully alive 
to all things which tend to promote the interests and welfare of the candidates 
and measures advocated by the party of his choice. He is a member of the 
K. P., being the prime mover in the organization of Monessen Lodge, No. 185, 
in which he has filled the chairs of chancellor and commander two terms. He 
is a member of the B. P. O. E. affiliating with Lodge Xo. yjT,. 

Mr. Rinehart married. November 6, 1890, Mary McGrew, daughter of 
Zerah and Adaline ( Phillips) McGrew, and granddaughter of Nathan and 
Catharine (Hayden) McGrew. Zerah McGrew, who died in 1882, was born 
and reared in Rostraver township, was a farmer by occupation, and after his 
marriage fo Adaline Phillips, who is living at the present time (1905), removed 
to McKees[)ort. where he was one of the influential citizens and a member of the 
borough council, and where his death occurred. He was well and favorably 
known throughout the community, was a devout Christian, and a charter mem- 
ber of the Christian church of McKeesport, in which he took an active part. 
He was also a member of the F. and A. }iL. L O. O. F., and N. of M. C. in 
which he took an active and prominent part. Mr. and Airs. Rinehart are the 
parents of two children : Harry F. and Virginia Lucretia Rinehart. The fam- 
ily are members of the Christian church. 

JACOB D. SHANER. a druggist and postmaster of Suterville, was 
born at Robbins, Westmoreland county, November 6. 1856. His grandfather, 
Jonathan Shaner. was the first American ancestor of the family, having emi- 
grated from Germany and settled in what is now known as Shaner's Station, 
the place being named for him. He entered government land and built a log 
house, where he lived during the active years of his life. Tn his latter vears 
he retired and resided with his children. 

Daniel Shaner, a son of Jonathan Shaner, was born at Shaner's Station. 
in 1834, and there he was reared, educated and learned his trades, those of car- 
penter and machinist. While there he married Susanna Dewalt. by whom he 
had ten children, si.x of whom are still living: Romeo, a resident of Moberlv, 
Missouri : Jacob D., of whom later ; Jonathan W., a resident of IMonongahcla 
City; Frank S. : Mollie, wife of F. A. Hamilton, of Monongahela Citv ; Mar- 



258 HISTORY OF WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 

garet, wife of a ]\Ir. Teeple, also of Monongahela City. Some years after his 
marriage he removed to Riverton, Allegheny eounty, where he worked for 
several years at carpentering and building, then went to Boston, Allegheny 
county, and engaged in the sawmill and lumber business. He then located at 
Buena Vista and took charge of the engines and machinery for the Armstrong 
coal mines. He continued there for about four years, then went to Monon- 
gahela City, where he was employed in the planing mills of Neal Blythe and 
Company as foreman. He died there in 1902. Politically he was a staunch 
Republican. He was a veteran of the Civil war, serving in the artillery ser- 
vice during the entire period of hostilities : he was a member of the G. A. R. 
In earlv life he was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, but later 
joined the Presbyterian church. 

Jacob D. Shaner was reared in his native place and attended the common 
.'^chools until about his tenth year, when he began to work, firing the engines 
at the coal mines in Boston. He gradually rose to the position of engineer, 
and continued at that place until he had reached the age of twenty-one. He 
then removed to Buena Vista and was employed at the mines for about two 
years, then returned to Boston, and was given charge of the company stores at 
that place. After a short time he went to Monongahela City and engaged in 
teaming and transfer bus work, but in 1880 he came to Suterville and found 
employment in the drug store of his cousin, A. L. Marsh, under whom he be- 
gan the study of the druggist profession. After seven years he went into the 
drug business for himself, and on April I, 1904, removed to his present modern 
quarters in the First National Bank building. He is a member of the junior 
O. U. A. M. Politically he is a Re[)ublican, and received his appointment of 
postmaster during the AIcKinley administration and is now serving a second 
term. Mr. Shaner married, in September, 1892, Ann Pyle, of Suterville. One 
child has been born to them, Thelma Shaner. 

HENRY W. NULL, an enterprising and prosperous business man 
of West Newton, proprietor of a shoe store which is located in one of the best 
business blocks of that thriving town, is a native of South Huntingdon town- 
ship, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, born January 5, 1854. 

Captain Philip Null, great-grandfather of Henry W. Null, was born in 
Wrightsville, Pennsylvania, and was there reared and educated. He was an 
officer in the Revolutionary war, serving under Generals Marion and Sump- 
ter. and upon the cessation of hostilities located and resided for some years 
in Lincolnton, North Carolina. He then returned north and for a time was 
a resident of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, liv